Flying to Nowhere a Tale PDF/EPUB ß Nowhere a PDF

Flying to Nowhere a Tale PDF/EPUB ß Nowhere a PDF

Flying to Nowhere a Tale [Ebook] ➠ Flying to Nowhere a Tale By John Fuller – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk John Fuller's first novel opens with the arrival of church agent Vane on a remote Welsh island where he is to investigate the disappearance of pilgrims visiting its sacred well While Vane looks for cl John Fuller's first novel opens with Nowhere a PDF Ç the arrival of church agent Vane on a Flying to Epub / remote Welsh island where he is to investigate the disappearance of pilgrims visiting its sacred to Nowhere a Epub ´ well While Vane looks for clues and corpses the local Abbot seaches for the location of the soul Magical and poetic Flying to Nowhere awakens our secret hopes and fears and our need to believe in miracles.


About the Author: John Fuller

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10 thoughts on “Flying to Nowhere a Tale

  1. Richard Derus Richard Derus says:

    Rating 45 of fiveThe Publisher Says Flying to Nowhere is a modern Gothic novel with spiritual overtones that open out a set of classic novelistic uests Set on a remote Welsh island during the Middle Ages the tale is woven around two main charactersemdash;Vane an emissary sent by the Bishop to investigate the disappearance of a number of pilgrims to the island's miraculous well; and the abbot who dissects cadavers in a desperate attempt to find the human soul In language that oscillates between graphic and lyrical extremes John Fuller relates the intricate thematic parallels of their uests which remain unresolved even at the end Flying to Nowhere in which the existence of absolute truth is openly challenged asks unanswerable uestions and encourages provocative speculationMy Review Fuller's modern Gothic novella it's so short is an incantation to Kalliope a hymn to gods hanging on to existence and power just barely because of hymn singers like this doing their blessed workI loved the idea of a book that juxtaposes ancient and modern journeys sea and dissection I felt as each part of the book wavered into focus the little shiver of anticipatory longingA beautiful word bath A pleasure to read A toe curling literary satisfaction


  2. Paul Bryant Paul Bryant says:

    The sky is ablaze with chilly sunshine and the leaves swirl down today is just like P B Bear's windy day and it puts you in the mood for rereading a few novels from a long long time ago which I never do The first was Wise Blood still crazy after all these years and the second was Flying to Nowhere all of 88 pages long is it really a novel? Is there such a thing as the world's tallest dwarf or are there some uestions best left unanswered? This reread was just as baffling and just as stuffed full of barmey religious people as Flannery O'Connor but John Fuller being one of those poets decorates every sentence as madly as they decorate all the cakes on the Great British Bake Off He tells a tale of a crazed abbott conducting vivisection on hapless pilgrims on a remote is there any other type Welsh island so the Bishop sends his top guy to investigate but he falls down a drain Pretty weird Onward to the third reread Morality Play which is yet religious stuff I am seeing a pattern here


  3. jacq jacq says:

    This is one of the worst books I’ve read in recent memory The language was poetic to the point of feeling forced and the jumbled plot and characters made it extremely hard to read At least it was a short one


  4. Bev Bev says:

    The New York Times Book Review called John Fuller's Flying to Nowhere As rich and exciting as The Name of the Rose but deeper and disturbing I call it one weird little book The blurb on the back makes it sound like a mystery Set at an isolated monastery on an island off the coast of Wales it follows Vane an emissary from the bishop who has been sent to investigate the disappearance of over twenty pilgrims who never returned from a visit to the island's miraculous well The Abbot seems remarkably unconcerned that pilgrims have vanished And in fact seems rather vague about whether any pilgrims ever arrived at all He doesn't really bother himself with that you know He's too busy dissecting any cadavers that happen to come his way in an all out search for the body's seat of the human soul Has the Abbot been knocking off pilgrims in his uest for knowledge?You got meCan't say we really get an answer to that Or to much of anything Let's just say that William of Baskerville from Name of the Rose the emissary Vane ain't His method of investigation is hard to follow and his interviews with various members of the monastery are thoroughly unsatisfactory Everyone from the Abbot to the novices either refuse to answer or give answers that make very little sense and he doesn't really follow up on that As detective fiction of any sort the book is a dismal failure and not even close to being in Eco's league Fuller seems much interested in the mystery of the human soul and investigating the boundaries between body and soul and between life and death than telling us what really happened to those pilgrims Oh we do get an answer of sorts but not one that tells us who or what was responsible The book is much mystical than mysterious But the uestions it poses aren't asked in a satisfactory or compelling manner There are no interesting or sympathetic characters to root for the most sympathetic character is Vane's horse and he doesn't last past the first few pages That's not a spoilertrust meOver all a disappointing book and definitely not what I expected when I read the words a vastly entertaining murder mystery on the back ★ maybeFirst posted on my blog My Reader's Block Please reuest permission before reposting Thanks


  5. Angela Angela says:

    Incredibly fucking frustrating A Gothic horror novella woefully marketed as a medieval murder mystery There's no suspense There's no investigation no clues no crime just a succession of surreal grotesue vignettes John Fuller masterfully creates this viscerate landscape where warm damp things grow in the dark mysterious rank liuids leak from the walls arterial staircases wind endlessly from room to infernal room rotten flesh bobs and bloats and writhes in bottomless wells and on wave tossed cliffs all of which is no substitute for character development or a plot A real plot Is that so hard?


  6. Sarah Sarah says:

    Very odd; very peculiar So dense with lyrical language it takes real effort to make it through the fairly simple plot and while I appreciate the book's ruminations on life death and the separation of flesh and spirit I have trouble with any written work that sacrifices story for experimentation in how that story is told


  7. Daphne Daphne says:

    I can't even begin to say I understood everything in this book I'm not even sure one is supposed to It was a beautiful and interesting story though I highly recommend it and if you do pick it up don't look up much about it before you spend a couple hours curled up with it and a warm mug of tea


  8. Thomas Thomas says:

    I have a sentimental attachment to this book and have read it many times usually in the middle of the night when I'm sick or can't sleep It is a dark and broody tale a poetic meditation on the soul in the form of a gothic mystery There is a little of the conventional mystery here but not much Its main concern is with the soul both as spirit and as life principle and with the transformation of life which is to say death Every detail matters here Sip it slowly


  9. Nic Nic says:

    Review originally posted at Eve's Alexandria in 2013 John Fuller's Booker shortlisted Flying To Nowhere 1983 is such an odd charming little novel or perhaps accurately novella since it's 105 pages long and uite large of print that it almost seems a shame to say too much about it It centres on a remote Welsh island home to a community of monks a bunch of women farmers and a sacred well that attracts pilgrims on account of its supposed healing properties When the healing miracles mysteriously dry up to the extent that pilgrims increasingly seem not to be returning from the island at all let alone going home cured an ecclesiastical agent from the mainland named Vane is sent to investigate He arrives standing with one foot on the prow like a clerk who supposes he is reuired to be a hero and that's about the last time anything makes much senseFuller is a poet I gather and that comes through in his novel's vivid imagery and gnomic dialogue; in many ways Flying to Nowhere is less a story than a series of striking tableaux with captions When the horse accompanying Vane on his boat panics during the landing and ends up fatally injured on the treacherous coast the episode is described through the almost inhumanly detached point of view of a young rather pretentious and over serious novice The hooves struggled to keep the body upright but one leg was already broken from the jump and as the horse heaved sank and scrambled among the slippery rocks other bones failed him For a moment it seemed as if the glistening torso might try to move by itself in a series of wriggles and lunges dragging with it the bunched and useless withers and fetlocks One rear leg was flattened at an unusual angle from the knee; the other seemed caught between two rocksThe passage seems set on dismembering the horse before it is even dead; while horse as a whole creature gets three verbs attached to it in uick fire succession most of the struggles and the suffering here are anatomised as the provinces of individual body parts all carefully specified hooves torso legs bones withers fetlocks The detachment of unusual angle and seemed is so lacking in apparent empathy that it borders on callousThis is not a young man unaware of the physical A few pages earlier we are told of the novices' struggles with their monastic clothing The garments of meditation are not designed for the pace of prologue; they walked swiftly though without urgency At each step their garments were caught between their legs tugging and chafing their calves and of our novice in particular reflecting on what he sees around him from within the stifling privacy of his cowl How stifling the enforced privacy of the monastery proves to be is one of the things the book explores; our novice is not unaware of the physical but he is terrified of it and utterly determined to ignore it at all costsRanged against the self denying idealistic novices are the women of the island who are practical and earthy to a rather cliched it must be said fault When we first meet them they are engaged in hard physical labour in the fields the novices are walking through; their sweat is lovingly described Later one young woman is described as in the semi seclusion of her bed in a communal women's dormitory holding the flowers of her breasts and filling them in her mind like filling cupped hands with the heaviness of spring water trickling cool through the fingersThe imagery is arresting; I like the water's unexpected heaviness though not so much the flower boobs not least because how exactly do you fill a flower in a way that makes any enlightening metaphorical sense when applied to breasts? But it does feed in a wider rather trying dichotomy of Earth Mother women set in contrast to airy intellectual men The women we're told enjoy cheerful shared activity on account of the female response to the seasons and to what fittingly belonged to them It was an absolute virtue of the sex tested and proved in the full round of life because women are so natural and earthy and in naturally in touch with naturey earthy things while the men think Really Deep Thoughts Pedestalling half of humanity isn't much of an improvement over pillorying them since the end effect is still a dehumanising denial of individuality and while it might be argued that all this is an extension of the novel's themes about life body and spirit and that it therefore is a deliberate expression of the male characters' rather aetiolated emotional development the narrative tends to reinforce the view rather than challenge itBut this is one area where the novel's brevity and its opacity work to its advantage; I was absorbed enough over the short page count to keep the eye rolling to a minimum and be puzzled at what exactly Fuller is getting at A couple of female characters have some wonderfully elliptical things to say as in this dormitory conversation Are you crumbling away too Gweno?No no It's leaving me pure and new and now I've died and got wings and I'm flying away Can't you see?Her fingers moved in the moonlight and their shadows moved in the raftersYes came several voices We can see you flying away Where are you flying to?I'm flying to nowhere I'm just becoming myselfThis exchange seems to suggest a combination of bodily and extra bodily experience something echoed elsewhere in one character's distinctly un monastic musing that sex can be transcendant Remember that spending with women is a struggle from roots an attempt to fly and in the central debate between Vane and the Abbot about miracles and the well To call it a 'debate' is to overstate the case somewhat; the two men fence warily at intervals and mostly manage to talk past rather than to each other This is about as direct as it gets I cannot arrange cures Cures are not for saleAre you saying that there are no cures? asked VanePerhaps there have been cures but I do not know in every case what has caused themDry and energetic Vane wants straight answers and obedience and the well back online; the distracted doubting Abbot unconvinced as seen just above by the well's miraculous properties is busy secretly dissecting corpses to see if he can find the private chamber of the spirit and imagining the books on whose knowledge he has based so much of his identity dissolving back into their constitutent parts Could leather be cured of its curing? He would lose first those books bound in vellum for the bindings would turn back to stomachs and digest the contents Or the shelves would grow into a hedge and keep out the hand that reached for knowledgeMore earthiness Amid an increasingly glowering atmosphere as the investigation seems to hint and at foul play Vane finds himself starting at shadows and wondering who he can trust Having demanded a meal of meat his doubts soon make him rue what he asked for a plate of meat produced in sly triumph It was dark sweet meat three slices of it in a wooden dish and Vane had wolfed it down as if he had not eaten for a fortnight Now it lay uneasily on his stomach like an animal twitching in a nightmareFun pretty and full of dark hints I liked


  10. Nat Nat says:

    Hmmmno one seems to be reading John Fuller Now's your chance to change that This book is a series of dreamy impressionistic vignettes which depict facets of life for young girls in a convent Like many of the best authors Fuller is a poet and this book has an enchanted lyrical uality in its texture The writing is sensual and much better than most I value the surface texture in art an aspect which is much important than the conceptual nature of a piece So I wish novelists paid attention to the music of their writing This however is a beautiful book


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10 thoughts on “Flying to Nowhere a Tale

  1. Richard Derus Richard Derus says:

    Rating 45 of fiveThe Publisher Says Flying to Nowhere is a modern Gothic novel with spiritual overtones that open out a set of classic novelistic uests Set on a remote Welsh island during the Middle Ages the tale is woven around two main charactersemdash;Vane an emissary sent by the Bishop to investigate the disappearance of a number of pilgrims to the island's miraculous well; and the abbot who dissects cadavers in a desperate attempt to find the human soul In language that oscillates between graphic and lyrical extremes John Fuller relates the intricate thematic parallels of their uests which remain unresolved even at the end Flying to Nowhere in which the existence of absolute truth is openly challenged asks unanswerable uestions and encourages provocative speculationMy Review Fuller's modern Gothic novella it's so short is an incantation to Kalliope a hymn to gods hanging on to existence and power just barely because of hymn singers like this doing their blessed workI loved the idea of a book that juxtaposes ancient and modern journeys sea and dissection I felt as each part of the book wavered into focus the little shiver of anticipatory longingA beautiful word bath A pleasure to read A toe curling literary satisfaction

  2. Paul Bryant Paul Bryant says:

    The sky is ablaze with chilly sunshine and the leaves swirl down today is just like P B Bear's windy day and it puts you in the mood for rereading a few novels from a long long time ago which I never do The first was Wise Blood still crazy after all these years and the second was Flying to Nowhere all of 88 pages long is it really a novel? Is there such a thing as the world's tallest dwarf or are there some uestions best left unanswered? This reread was just as baffling and just as stuffed full of barmey religious people as Flannery O'Connor but John Fuller being one of those poets decorates every sentence as madly as they decorate all the cakes on the Great British Bake Off He tells a tale of a crazed abbott conducting vivisection on hapless pilgrims on a remote is there any other type Welsh island so the Bishop sends his top guy to investigate but he falls down a drain Pretty weird Onward to the third reread Morality Play which is yet religious stuff I am seeing a pattern here

  3. jacq jacq says:

    This is one of the worst books I’ve read in recent memory The language was poetic to the point of feeling forced and the jumbled plot and characters made it extremely hard to read At least it was a short one

  4. Bev Bev says:

    The New York Times Book Review called John Fuller's Flying to Nowhere As rich and exciting as The Name of the Rose but deeper and disturbing I call it one weird little book The blurb on the back makes it sound like a mystery Set at an isolated monastery on an island off the coast of Wales it follows Vane an emissary from the bishop who has been sent to investigate the disappearance of over twenty pilgrims who never returned from a visit to the island's miraculous well The Abbot seems remarkably unconcerned that pilgrims have vanished And in fact seems rather vague about whether any pilgrims ever arrived at all He doesn't really bother himself with that you know He's too busy dissecting any cadavers that happen to come his way in an all out search for the body's seat of the human soul Has the Abbot been knocking off pilgrims in his uest for knowledge?You got meCan't say we really get an answer to that Or to much of anything Let's just say that William of Baskerville from Name of the Rose the emissary Vane ain't His method of investigation is hard to follow and his interviews with various members of the monastery are thoroughly unsatisfactory Everyone from the Abbot to the novices either refuse to answer or give answers that make very little sense and he doesn't really follow up on that As detective fiction of any sort the book is a dismal failure and not even close to being in Eco's league Fuller seems much interested in the mystery of the human soul and investigating the boundaries between body and soul and between life and death than telling us what really happened to those pilgrims Oh we do get an answer of sorts but not one that tells us who or what was responsible The book is much mystical than mysterious But the uestions it poses aren't asked in a satisfactory or compelling manner There are no interesting or sympathetic characters to root for the most sympathetic character is Vane's horse and he doesn't last past the first few pages That's not a spoilertrust meOver all a disappointing book and definitely not what I expected when I read the words a vastly entertaining murder mystery on the back ★ maybeFirst posted on my blog My Reader's Block Please reuest permission before reposting Thanks

  5. Angela Angela says:

    Incredibly fucking frustrating A Gothic horror novella woefully marketed as a medieval murder mystery There's no suspense There's no investigation no clues no crime just a succession of surreal grotesue vignettes John Fuller masterfully creates this viscerate landscape where warm damp things grow in the dark mysterious rank liuids leak from the walls arterial staircases wind endlessly from room to infernal room rotten flesh bobs and bloats and writhes in bottomless wells and on wave tossed cliffs all of which is no substitute for character development or a plot A real plot Is that so hard?

  6. Sarah Sarah says:

    Very odd; very peculiar So dense with lyrical language it takes real effort to make it through the fairly simple plot and while I appreciate the book's ruminations on life death and the separation of flesh and spirit I have trouble with any written work that sacrifices story for experimentation in how that story is told

  7. Daphne Daphne says:

    I can't even begin to say I understood everything in this book I'm not even sure one is supposed to It was a beautiful and interesting story though I highly recommend it and if you do pick it up don't look up much about it before you spend a couple hours curled up with it and a warm mug of tea

  8. Thomas Thomas says:

    I have a sentimental attachment to this book and have read it many times usually in the middle of the night when I'm sick or can't sleep It is a dark and broody tale a poetic meditation on the soul in the form of a gothic mystery There is a little of the conventional mystery here but not much Its main concern is with the soul both as spirit and as life principle and with the transformation of life which is to say death Every detail matters here Sip it slowly

  9. Nic Nic says:

    Review originally posted at Eve's Alexandria in 2013 John Fuller's Booker shortlisted Flying To Nowhere 1983 is such an odd charming little novel or perhaps accurately novella since it's 105 pages long and uite large of print that it almost seems a shame to say too much about it It centres on a remote Welsh island home to a community of monks a bunch of women farmers and a sacred well that attracts pilgrims on account of its supposed healing properties When the healing miracles mysteriously dry up to the extent that pilgrims increasingly seem not to be returning from the island at all let alone going home cured an ecclesiastical agent from the mainland named Vane is sent to investigate He arrives standing with one foot on the prow like a clerk who supposes he is reuired to be a hero and that's about the last time anything makes much senseFuller is a poet I gather and that comes through in his novel's vivid imagery and gnomic dialogue; in many ways Flying to Nowhere is less a story than a series of striking tableaux with captions When the horse accompanying Vane on his boat panics during the landing and ends up fatally injured on the treacherous coast the episode is described through the almost inhumanly detached point of view of a young rather pretentious and over serious novice The hooves struggled to keep the body upright but one leg was already broken from the jump and as the horse heaved sank and scrambled among the slippery rocks other bones failed him For a moment it seemed as if the glistening torso might try to move by itself in a series of wriggles and lunges dragging with it the bunched and useless withers and fetlocks One rear leg was flattened at an unusual angle from the knee; the other seemed caught between two rocksThe passage seems set on dismembering the horse before it is even dead; while horse as a whole creature gets three verbs attached to it in uick fire succession most of the struggles and the suffering here are anatomised as the provinces of individual body parts all carefully specified hooves torso legs bones withers fetlocks The detachment of unusual angle and seemed is so lacking in apparent empathy that it borders on callousThis is not a young man unaware of the physical A few pages earlier we are told of the novices' struggles with their monastic clothing The garments of meditation are not designed for the pace of prologue; they walked swiftly though without urgency At each step their garments were caught between their legs tugging and chafing their calves and of our novice in particular reflecting on what he sees around him from within the stifling privacy of his cowl How stifling the enforced privacy of the monastery proves to be is one of the things the book explores; our novice is not unaware of the physical but he is terrified of it and utterly determined to ignore it at all costsRanged against the self denying idealistic novices are the women of the island who are practical and earthy to a rather cliched it must be said fault When we first meet them they are engaged in hard physical labour in the fields the novices are walking through; their sweat is lovingly described Later one young woman is described as in the semi seclusion of her bed in a communal women's dormitory holding the flowers of her breasts and filling them in her mind like filling cupped hands with the heaviness of spring water trickling cool through the fingersThe imagery is arresting; I like the water's unexpected heaviness though not so much the flower boobs not least because how exactly do you fill a flower in a way that makes any enlightening metaphorical sense when applied to breasts? But it does feed in a wider rather trying dichotomy of Earth Mother women set in contrast to airy intellectual men The women we're told enjoy cheerful shared activity on account of the female response to the seasons and to what fittingly belonged to them It was an absolute virtue of the sex tested and proved in the full round of life because women are so natural and earthy and in naturally in touch with naturey earthy things while the men think Really Deep Thoughts Pedestalling half of humanity isn't much of an improvement over pillorying them since the end effect is still a dehumanising denial of individuality and while it might be argued that all this is an extension of the novel's themes about life body and spirit and that it therefore is a deliberate expression of the male characters' rather aetiolated emotional development the narrative tends to reinforce the view rather than challenge itBut this is one area where the novel's brevity and its opacity work to its advantage; I was absorbed enough over the short page count to keep the eye rolling to a minimum and be puzzled at what exactly Fuller is getting at A couple of female characters have some wonderfully elliptical things to say as in this dormitory conversation Are you crumbling away too Gweno?No no It's leaving me pure and new and now I've died and got wings and I'm flying away Can't you see?Her fingers moved in the moonlight and their shadows moved in the raftersYes came several voices We can see you flying away Where are you flying to?I'm flying to nowhere I'm just becoming myselfThis exchange seems to suggest a combination of bodily and extra bodily experience something echoed elsewhere in one character's distinctly un monastic musing that sex can be transcendant Remember that spending with women is a struggle from roots an attempt to fly and in the central debate between Vane and the Abbot about miracles and the well To call it a 'debate' is to overstate the case somewhat; the two men fence warily at intervals and mostly manage to talk past rather than to each other This is about as direct as it gets I cannot arrange cures Cures are not for saleAre you saying that there are no cures? asked VanePerhaps there have been cures but I do not know in every case what has caused themDry and energetic Vane wants straight answers and obedience and the well back online; the distracted doubting Abbot unconvinced as seen just above by the well's miraculous properties is busy secretly dissecting corpses to see if he can find the private chamber of the spirit and imagining the books on whose knowledge he has based so much of his identity dissolving back into their constitutent parts Could leather be cured of its curing? He would lose first those books bound in vellum for the bindings would turn back to stomachs and digest the contents Or the shelves would grow into a hedge and keep out the hand that reached for knowledgeMore earthiness Amid an increasingly glowering atmosphere as the investigation seems to hint and at foul play Vane finds himself starting at shadows and wondering who he can trust Having demanded a meal of meat his doubts soon make him rue what he asked for a plate of meat produced in sly triumph It was dark sweet meat three slices of it in a wooden dish and Vane had wolfed it down as if he had not eaten for a fortnight Now it lay uneasily on his stomach like an animal twitching in a nightmareFun pretty and full of dark hints I liked

  10. Nat Nat says:

    Hmmmno one seems to be reading John Fuller Now's your chance to change that This book is a series of dreamy impressionistic vignettes which depict facets of life for young girls in a convent Like many of the best authors Fuller is a poet and this book has an enchanted lyrical uality in its texture The writing is sensual and much better than most I value the surface texture in art an aspect which is much important than the conceptual nature of a piece So I wish novelists paid attention to the music of their writing This however is a beautiful book

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