Hardcover ï Höll minninganna Epub Þ

Hardcover ï Höll minninganna Epub Þ


Höll minninganna [KINDLE] ❥ Höll minninganna ➛ Olaf Olafsson – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk From the acclaimed author of The Journey Home a new novel of tremendous power and beauty about a man’s hidden past and about the immutability of love and lossFor twenty years Christian Benediktsson From the acclaimed author of The Journey Home a new novel of tremendous power and beauty about a man’s hidden past and about the immutability of love and lossFor twenty years Christian Benediktsson has led a uiet life as William Randolph Hearst’s butler His days are filled with the rituals of Hearst’s life and the demands of running a grand house But in his most private thoughts and memories he relives another life his abandonment of his wife and children in Iceland for an actress in New York a reckless affair and a tragic death financial downfall and the profound retreat from life that led him to Hearst’s San Simeon No one else knows the secret of the man he once was—husband father businessman lover—and ultimately even he will choose to forget that this person ever existed Walking into the Night is a stunning portrait of a man wrestling with guilt and secret passions Olaf Olafsson surpasses anything he has accomplished thus far in this wise and beautiful novel.


10 thoughts on “Höll minninganna

  1. Bettie Bettie says:

    view spoiler Bettie's Books hide spoiler


  2. Jenny (Reading Envy) Jenny (Reading Envy) says:

    I read this book in my attempt to read Icelandic authors but the majority of the novel is set on William Randolph Hearst's property in California The main character works for Hearst as a butler Half of the book is his letters to his wife who he abandoned in Iceland with the children taking their money The story is told in a somewhat circular way between the letters and the present day drama that I felt disconnected from both and in the end you are merely where you started somehow


  3. Proustitute Proustitute says:

    Olaf Olafsson's Walking into the Night will draw inevitable comparisons to Kazuo Ishiguro's The Remains of the Day both of which have butlers as their protagonists While both deal with conflicted manservants' inner anxieties and failures in the midst of a changing global crisis—Ishiguro's novel focuses on the build up to the Second World War in Britain whereas Olafsson's focuses on the years just prior to this in America emphasizing the Depression's impact on celebrities—they are very different in their treatment of their protagonists' inner livesStevens in The Remains of the Day has reflections about his childhood but his anxieties and stalemates are located uncannily in his place of work By contrast Kristjan's reflections are of a lost world that is no longer available to him geographically or emotionally except in dreams and memories I could say about the two novels' similarities and differences but I suppose that would then see me repeated the critical move of joining the two so simply and irrevocably I think that any novel that has a male butler as its protagonist especially given the brilliant portrayal of Stevens's conflict by Ishiguro will always be compared to The Remains of the Day Ishiguro has in essence created a subgenre all his own thenTo return to OlafssonKristjan is unfailing at his duties as Chief Hearst's butler but his nagging conscience the mistakes that he has made in the past his regrets and his isolation not least of which is underscored by his choice to move from Iceland to California from a job of power to a job of service soon interfere with his typically by rote existence at the San Simeon castleIn stark spare and unrelentingly gutting prose Olafsson shifts the point of view here in a way that gives the reader increasing glimpses into the interior life of his main character and then by turns to Elisabet the woman whom he has left behind and to whom he writes letters he will never send The idea of confession is very intriguing here how the person to whom Kristjan feels he must confess is the one person he will never see againBleak but beautifully imagined Walking into the Night is a meditation on love loss and the myriad regrets we make as we go on about our lives Olafsson is a master at rendering place especially outdoor scenes and also in insisting on how tiny gestures the closing of a door the gathering of blossoms a finger tracing a lover's spine can convey the emotional and psychological states of people succinctly and accurately than words can


  4. Maggie Maggie says:

    This is a beautifully written historical novel is set in the 1930s Most of the story takes place at San Simeon California but the memories of the protagonist Kristjan take the reader back to Iceland and on journeys to New York as well The vast majority of the book is written from Kristjan's point of view mostly in the form of letters written by Kristjan to his wife Elisabet and they slowly and circuitously give the reader the information on Kristjan's life before coming to San Simeon For me that part of the book was most effective and affecting I was in the moment with Kristjan even though as the pages increased I grew less and less sympathetic to him There were a couple of instances in the book where the view suddenly changes to Elisabet's life and I found that part of the book much less interesting though she had my sympathy It felt as if the editor had imposed that on the author in order for the reader to get the story of life back home I didn't need that story knowing that the Roaring Twenties had lead to the Great Depression with worldwide ramifications I could figure out how things would have gone Further the same information could have been easily included in the letter from Hans Thorstensen which occurs at the end of the book That having been said I thoroughly enjoyed this book because it reminded me of the two trips I've made to San Simeon and as Kristjan walks around the house and grounds I was right there with him The complexities of lives of Kristjan Elisabet and Klara and of William Randolph Heart and Marion Davies were many varied and felt true to life Recommended


  5. Karolina Karolina says:

    In the last pages of this book where it finishes it starts again This is a real sad story mostly because it is very real I can feel this man's guilt and ignorance and at the same be horribly angry with all the things he's done The most shocking bit is reading those last pages and realizing this is what we do and this is what I do again and again like this man will Deal with a problem indirectly being too afraid to face it and continue running from ourselves The devotion and forgiveness of his wife is amazing too and I realized I'd be stuck in the same blindly hopeful cycle with someone I love This is a book hard to rate


  6. Lucinda Lucinda says:

    Review to come I am still digesting some thoughts on this fantastic book


  7. Kristi Kristi says:

    On the last page of the story of Christian Kristjan Benediktsson William Randolph Hearst says We all have to believe that we're decent No matter what we have to believe that For there are no innocents; life is full of mysteries and mistakes First of all this is am amazing statement attributed to an extremely ruthless and controlling man He calls Christian a good man Hearst is however unaware of Christian's history of deserting his wife and four children and depriving them of a considerable amount of money I believe the theme of the book is the personal struggle to live with his duality Two ways in which the author demonstrates this endeavor appears in the actual changes in two elements of the writing The first is the protagonist's name which switches from Christian and Kristjan sometimes dependent on setting Iceland vs New York or speaker The other changeable feature of the writing is the change from first person to third person narration Sometimes Chistian speaks as I; at other times an unknown third party speaks of he or him I did not notice the latter change in viewpoint until about half way through the book I tried to see when the omniscient third party took over versus Christian speaking as I but I could not detect a clear difference in the story line of the chapters Usually when the main character is not decent it is difficult to like In addition to being indecent Kristjan is also too much of a coward to allow anyone to know his secrets acknowledge his failures and apologize for his betrayals Yet Christian is not simply a villain In many ways he is decent helpful and loyal in his hiding place at San Simeon It is a compliment to the skill of author that he creates a character who is sufficiently complex that the reader cannot decide from chapter to chapter whether to admire or despise Kristjan This is an eminently readable book Christian and his life are full of mysteries and mistakes Kristi Abby Tabby


  8. Carol Carol says:

    I started reading this as part of a push to read as much about Iceland as possible before a trip And then had to set it aside because of the trip But once I was home again I couldn’t put it down I had read The Long Journey Home first and really wasn’t a fan of the protagonist The main character in this story was every bit as complicated and lacking in insight to his own behavior and yet I found myself hoping he would find peace The bulk of this book takes place at Hearst’s residence at San Simeon where Kristjan serves as a butler That added a little to it for me because I remember visiting that place as a child what an absurd display of opulence But it was a different timeI see that most people are less enthusiastic about this book but I recommend it You do have to go into it understanding that people are who they are and even deeply flawed people have a good side


  9. Lavonne Lavonne says:

    This is the first book by this author that I have read and I couldn't put it down even though it was emotionally dark during this dark time in America the world The story was delivered primarily from one person's point of view through letters or memoriesevents The story of ChristianKristjan's life drew me in and captured my interest through the highs and lows of his experiences and emotions As with everyone singular decisions have the ability to totally change the direction of a person's life and by default those within their circles Birds are intertwined throughout I need to continue to think about their significance One of my favorite sentences is from page 241 There is a corner of the soul where the shadows dwell Looking forward to of his novels Would welcome suggestions


  10. John John says:

    A sad story about a man Christian Benediktsson who without notice leaves his wife and four children in Iceland by 'walking into the night' to begin a new life in AmericaWe all understand that the decisions we make in our lives have conseuences For Christian the conseuence of his decision to leave his family is an unfulfilled life that is burdened with guiltReaders who like novels that have happy endings and answers to unresolved uestions may be disappointed with this book; however the beautiful prose of Olaf Olafsson provided this reader with a rich experience and I look forward to reading of his works


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10 thoughts on “Höll minninganna

  1. Bettie Bettie says:

    view spoiler Bettie's Books hide spoiler

  2. Jenny (Reading Envy) Jenny (Reading Envy) says:

    I read this book in my attempt to read Icelandic authors but the majority of the novel is set on William Randolph Hearst's property in California The main character works for Hearst as a butler Half of the book is his letters to his wife who he abandoned in Iceland with the children taking their money The story is told in a somewhat circular way between the letters and the present day drama that I felt disconnected from both and in the end you are merely where you started somehow

  3. Proustitute Proustitute says:

    Olaf Olafsson's Walking into the Night will draw inevitable comparisons to Kazuo Ishiguro's The Remains of the Day both of which have butlers as their protagonists While both deal with conflicted manservants' inner anxieties and failures in the midst of a changing global crisis—Ishiguro's novel focuses on the build up to the Second World War in Britain whereas Olafsson's focuses on the years just prior to this in America emphasizing the Depression's impact on celebrities—they are very different in their treatment of their protagonists' inner livesStevens in The Remains of the Day has reflections about his childhood but his anxieties and stalemates are located uncannily in his place of work By contrast Kristjan's reflections are of a lost world that is no longer available to him geographically or emotionally except in dreams and memories I could say about the two novels' similarities and differences but I suppose that would then see me repeated the critical move of joining the two so simply and irrevocably I think that any novel that has a male butler as its protagonist especially given the brilliant portrayal of Stevens's conflict by Ishiguro will always be compared to The Remains of the Day Ishiguro has in essence created a subgenre all his own thenTo return to OlafssonKristjan is unfailing at his duties as Chief Hearst's butler but his nagging conscience the mistakes that he has made in the past his regrets and his isolation not least of which is underscored by his choice to move from Iceland to California from a job of power to a job of service soon interfere with his typically by rote existence at the San Simeon castleIn stark spare and unrelentingly gutting prose Olafsson shifts the point of view here in a way that gives the reader increasing glimpses into the interior life of his main character and then by turns to Elisabet the woman whom he has left behind and to whom he writes letters he will never send The idea of confession is very intriguing here how the person to whom Kristjan feels he must confess is the one person he will never see againBleak but beautifully imagined Walking into the Night is a meditation on love loss and the myriad regrets we make as we go on about our lives Olafsson is a master at rendering place especially outdoor scenes and also in insisting on how tiny gestures the closing of a door the gathering of blossoms a finger tracing a lover's spine can convey the emotional and psychological states of people succinctly and accurately than words can

  4. Maggie Maggie says:

    This is a beautifully written historical novel is set in the 1930s Most of the story takes place at San Simeon California but the memories of the protagonist Kristjan take the reader back to Iceland and on journeys to New York as well The vast majority of the book is written from Kristjan's point of view mostly in the form of letters written by Kristjan to his wife Elisabet and they slowly and circuitously give the reader the information on Kristjan's life before coming to San Simeon For me that part of the book was most effective and affecting I was in the moment with Kristjan even though as the pages increased I grew less and less sympathetic to him There were a couple of instances in the book where the view suddenly changes to Elisabet's life and I found that part of the book much less interesting though she had my sympathy It felt as if the editor had imposed that on the author in order for the reader to get the story of life back home I didn't need that story knowing that the Roaring Twenties had lead to the Great Depression with worldwide ramifications I could figure out how things would have gone Further the same information could have been easily included in the letter from Hans Thorstensen which occurs at the end of the book That having been said I thoroughly enjoyed this book because it reminded me of the two trips I've made to San Simeon and as Kristjan walks around the house and grounds I was right there with him The complexities of lives of Kristjan Elisabet and Klara and of William Randolph Heart and Marion Davies were many varied and felt true to life Recommended

  5. Karolina Karolina says:

    In the last pages of this book where it finishes it starts again This is a real sad story mostly because it is very real I can feel this man's guilt and ignorance and at the same be horribly angry with all the things he's done The most shocking bit is reading those last pages and realizing this is what we do and this is what I do again and again like this man will Deal with a problem indirectly being too afraid to face it and continue running from ourselves The devotion and forgiveness of his wife is amazing too and I realized I'd be stuck in the same blindly hopeful cycle with someone I love This is a book hard to rate

  6. Lucinda Lucinda says:

    Review to come I am still digesting some thoughts on this fantastic book

  7. Kristi Kristi says:

    On the last page of the story of Christian Kristjan Benediktsson William Randolph Hearst says We all have to believe that we're decent No matter what we have to believe that For there are no innocents; life is full of mysteries and mistakes First of all this is am amazing statement attributed to an extremely ruthless and controlling man He calls Christian a good man Hearst is however unaware of Christian's history of deserting his wife and four children and depriving them of a considerable amount of money I believe the theme of the book is the personal struggle to live with his duality Two ways in which the author demonstrates this endeavor appears in the actual changes in two elements of the writing The first is the protagonist's name which switches from Christian and Kristjan sometimes dependent on setting Iceland vs New York or speaker The other changeable feature of the writing is the change from first person to third person narration Sometimes Chistian speaks as I; at other times an unknown third party speaks of he or him I did not notice the latter change in viewpoint until about half way through the book I tried to see when the omniscient third party took over versus Christian speaking as I but I could not detect a clear difference in the story line of the chapters Usually when the main character is not decent it is difficult to like In addition to being indecent Kristjan is also too much of a coward to allow anyone to know his secrets acknowledge his failures and apologize for his betrayals Yet Christian is not simply a villain In many ways he is decent helpful and loyal in his hiding place at San Simeon It is a compliment to the skill of author that he creates a character who is sufficiently complex that the reader cannot decide from chapter to chapter whether to admire or despise Kristjan This is an eminently readable book Christian and his life are full of mysteries and mistakes Kristi Abby Tabby

  8. Carol Carol says:

    I started reading this as part of a push to read as much about Iceland as possible before a trip And then had to set it aside because of the trip But once I was home again I couldn’t put it down I had read The Long Journey Home first and really wasn’t a fan of the protagonist The main character in this story was every bit as complicated and lacking in insight to his own behavior and yet I found myself hoping he would find peace The bulk of this book takes place at Hearst’s residence at San Simeon where Kristjan serves as a butler That added a little to it for me because I remember visiting that place as a child what an absurd display of opulence But it was a different timeI see that most people are less enthusiastic about this book but I recommend it You do have to go into it understanding that people are who they are and even deeply flawed people have a good side

  9. Lavonne Lavonne says:

    This is the first book by this author that I have read and I couldn't put it down even though it was emotionally dark during this dark time in America the world The story was delivered primarily from one person's point of view through letters or memoriesevents The story of ChristianKristjan's life drew me in and captured my interest through the highs and lows of his experiences and emotions As with everyone singular decisions have the ability to totally change the direction of a person's life and by default those within their circles Birds are intertwined throughout I need to continue to think about their significance One of my favorite sentences is from page 241 There is a corner of the soul where the shadows dwell Looking forward to of his novels Would welcome suggestions

  10. John John says:

    A sad story about a man Christian Benediktsson who without notice leaves his wife and four children in Iceland by 'walking into the night' to begin a new life in AmericaWe all understand that the decisions we make in our lives have conseuences For Christian the conseuence of his decision to leave his family is an unfulfilled life that is burdened with guiltReaders who like novels that have happy endings and answers to unresolved uestions may be disappointed with this book; however the beautiful prose of Olaf Olafsson provided this reader with a rich experience and I look forward to reading of his works

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