Paperback è Everett Ruess PDF Þ

Paperback è Everett Ruess PDF Þ


Everett Ruess ➿ [Download] ➽ Everett Ruess By W.L. Rusho ➵ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Everett Ruess the young poet and artist who disappeared into the desert canyonlands of Utah in 1934 has become widely known posthumously as the spokesman for the spirit of the high desert Many have be Everett Ruess the young poet and artist who disappeared into the desert canyonlands of Utah in has become widely known posthumously as the spokesman for the spirit of the high desert Many have been inspired by his intense search for adventure leaving behind the amenities of a comfortable life His search for ultimate beauty and oneness with nature is chronicled in this remarkable collection of letters to family and friends.

  • Paperback
  • 228 pages
  • Everett Ruess
  • W.L. Rusho
  • English
  • 10 May 2014
  • 9780879052102

10 thoughts on “Everett Ruess

  1. fourtriplezed fourtriplezed says:

    If forced to use one word on this book fascinating comes to mind The book itself consists of letters by Everett Reuss from the age of 16 to his disappearance as a 20 year old in the Utah desert in 1934 This is not spoiling the book as the author explains his disappearance in both the preface and first chapter of the book The author writes in the preface that Everett “was a highly complex young man” and that is shown by the letters that he wrote to friends and family Everett Ruess began his wanderings at a young age He was 16 At that age the vast majority of boys and girls have on their minds than the determination to be an outsider free spirit Study their peer group and the opposite sex is the norm Everett was different He knew that At one point he writes “My tragedy is that I don’t fit in with any type of people” He writes along the same theme periodically His parents especially his mother knew this and that may have been why they never hindered him in his uest to travel With each letter it became apparent that he was an artist with an eye to see Beauty The author makes this clear from the first chapter; a chapter he aptly calls The Beauty and the Tragedy of Everett Ruess Everett himself wrote often on his need for Beauty and his art His Blockprints to my untrained eye show a depth of sharp imagination Everett was also an avid reader He makes mention of many books he reads in the letters he writes Those that have an interest in book reading could not be anything but impressed with the scope of literature that he devoured He read some books that must surely be interesting to the modern bibliophile Some are as noted as Don uixote Some are very obscure; The Fantastic Traveller by Maude Meagher is but one example of that The Fantastic Traveller does not even have a Goodreads entry but was seemingly popular in the early 1930’s from what I can ascertainIn a letter to his father he makes mention of a book called A Short Introduction to the History of Human Stupidity by Walter B Pitkin The then nineteen year old Everett says he is mentally stimulated by it He writes a few uotes from it that he thinks will interest his father When he make mention of works such as this I find it impossible not to look up on Goodreads and other sources Just as an example I found this link about Pitkins book for anyone that may be interested Vonnegut I was told mentioned this book in The Last Interview In the end though the need for the beauty of the wilderness runs deep in his letters and this may have led to his mysterious disappearance Even those that come into contact with him sensed his needs Archaeologist Clay Locket made mention of Everett nearly killing himself trying to find vantage points on steep and wet cliffs just to paint a watercolour He “loved everything” said Lockett who also called him a “strange kid” For those of us in a comfortable suburban life being that “strange kid” maybe what the attraction of this book is all about My good friend Gordon Wilson has a keen eye for books such as this and wrote Ruess was a wandering soul that “we can all relate to at some level” Well said Highly recommended for those that like travel

  2. Ron Ron says:

    This is a hard book to sum up in a few words Fascinating and compelling yes; heartbreaking often; hair raising sometimes; exasperating occasionally Mostly it is a vivid reminder of what it is to be still very young naive and adventuresome It's also a book that's very hard to put downThe reader of course knows from the start that Everett Ruess disappears at the age of 21 while on a walkabout somewhere near the Colorado River in the remote 1930s wilderness of southern Utah Gifted bright and almost painfully sensitive he writes letters home that are sweetly poignant thoughtful opinionated and rapturously descriptive of the natural environment he loves Starting at the age of 16 while still a high school student in Hollywood California he journeys to Carmel Arizona and the Sierras Leaving UCLA after one unhappy semester he returns to the Four Corners region of Arizona and drifts northward into Utah where he follows the Escalante down to the Colorado and then vanishesA lover of classical music a reader of books poet writer water colorist and block print maker he considers himself very much a misfit in a world of conformity where people live lives of uiet desperation pursuing material goals that make them unhappy and unfulfilled Torn between his desire for companionship and his love of wilderness solitude he appreciates warm and welcoming company wherever he happens upon it and seeks it out when he can sometimes introducing himself to established artists such as photographers Edward Weston and Ansel Adams During visits to the home of painter Maynard Dixon in San Francisco he is befriended and photographed by Dixon's wife Dorothea Lange One of these photographs eventually appears in a missing persons report in a publication of the Los Angeles Police DepartmentIt's easy to go on and on about this book The letters provide such a rich psychological portrait of this young man full of interesting contradictions and curious prophecies of his eventual fate Meanwhile there is the mystery of his disappearance and the various theories and speculation about what may have happened to him which are also included by the book's authorI am happy to recommend this book to anyone interested in the West stories about coming of age and self reliance rhapsodic descriptions of nature personal adventures the desert Native Americans and unsolved mysteries As companion volumes I'd also suggest Edward Abbey's Desert Solitaire and Eliot Porter's excellent collection of photographs The Place No One Knew Glen Canyon on the Colorado

  3. Ogross Ogross says:

    Read years ago and something made it come to mind today A wonderful and heartbreaking collection of letters written by a young artist wandering the Southwest Merged reviewAs I was reading Into the Wild I kept thinking how much Chris McCandless' story reminded me of this biography about Everett Ruess No surprise when Into the Wild had a whole chapter about that very same comparison I loved this story especially reading all the letters Everett wrote during his time traveling around the Southwest in the 1930's Both books truly touched some part of me that yearns to leave all the trappings of our consumerist society behind I thought anyone who read this would understand how I felt but I distinctly remember Rick surprising me with his non interest in the book He doesn't even remember reading it now

  4. Owen Curtsinger Owen Curtsinger says:

    Reading Everett's letters puts you right back in the restless uestioning that we often face around age 20 where am I going? What kind of people do I enjoy being around? How do I want to spend my time and energy and what are the forces that inspire me most to do so? His musings put me right back in that era of life showcasing the naivety of youth the struggle to find a place and people that make one feel at home and the harsh uestioning of the forces that shape a life As such reading the letters is an experience that ranges from exasperating to nostalgic to thought provoking In Everett's case however this is tempered by that fact his letters are written far elouently than I ever could have hoped to write at that age and the backdrop of his wanderings are far wilder and awe inspiring than the suburban environment of my late teenage years Reading his letters are like walking and chatting with him on a long desert walkAn eually important component of this book is the essays that explore Everett's disappearance and the search to find him; the fact that he vanished in one of the most rugged and remote parts of the country and was never uncovered seems mysterious and unnerving in our comfortable age of GPS and forensics technology If reading Everett's letters are like walking with him then these concluding essays are like a window into an wilder and sparsely populated period of the American West

  5. Chad Chad says:

    Unbeknownst to you the teenager you pass on the street may be an artist a writer and the main character in a great adventure And there are others who feel the Utah's red rock desert is so beautiful that it almost kills a sensitive person who immerses himself in it

  6. Jan Lynch Jan Lynch says:

    Beauty is an ultimate fulfillment as is Goodness as is Truth These are ends in themselves and are for the sake of life Many things are worthwhile that are not enduring Eternity is just made of todays Glorify the hour Advice from Everett Ruess's father 123Live gaily live deeply and wrest from life some of its infinite possibilities Everett Ruess 155For anyone who enjoyed Into the Wild this book referenced by Jon Krakauer is a must read Like McCandless Ruess abandons society in favor of becoming a wanderer but that is where similarity between the two ends Where McCandless's journey seems as much about running away from things as toward something Ruess's journey is different He is seeking beauty not running away from unhappiness Artistic and intelligent Ruess was born 1914 and raised by his painter mother and poetminister father Extraordinarily sensitive Ruess seeks fulfillment in tramping through the unexplored vastness of the West and while many parents would discourage this Ruess's parents support him A Vagabond for Beauty details Ruess's story in his own words through excerpts from letters and journals with Rusho providing only such information as is needed to tie all together The work sings when Ruess does the talking; after his disappearance the life goes out of the book I missed his voice which points to a bigger loss What might Ruess have become had he lived? I'm sorry we will never know

  7. Vicky Vicky says:

    I reread W L Rusho's Everett Ruess Vagabond for Beauty the letters of Ruess and the story of the various searches for him after he disappeared in 1934 This book is one of my favorites and even prompted many years ago a hike down into Davis Gulch to follow Ruess' last trail as it turns out he was miles away on the other side of the Colorado when he was murdered His writings about and passion for the canyon country remain a testament to the strong feelings this country evokes

  8. WhizKid WhizKid says:

    The letter between Everett Christopher Ruess Everett asks uestions and his father reply back in a letter1 Is service the true end of life? No but rather happiness through service Only as we play our part as a part of the whole aware of the interrelationedness do we really and fully live You and I are like the right hand or the right eye or the big toe we are grotesue when living apart2 Can a strong mind maintain independence and strength if it is not rooted in material independence?Yes as many great souls prove They were not independent Dependence and independence are alike harmful to the best life No dependent or independent man can play a high part in life but only the interdependent man Great souls today have issued a Declaration of Human Interdependence3 Do all things follow the attainment of Truth? No not unless you create a new definition of the truth It takes all three ideas of the reason to define the whole of culture or to define God He whose life is exclusively devoted to Truth or to Goodness or to Beauty is a very fractional man This age is in trouble because it has exaggerated truth it is lopsided There is no ultimate conflict when all three are stressed and as Aristotle says we see life sanely and see it whole4 Is bodily love empty or to be forgotten? No it is a part of life It is not all of life I don't see that it should ever be outgrown but it changes form; it begins animal and always remains healthily animal but it's refined and sublimated5 Can one ask too much of life? Yes many do We should have faith in life in cause and effect in action and reaction We owe much to the past than any one of us can give to the present or to the future It is not for us to play highway robber and hold up life The great souls probably never ask such a uestion But the greatest givers have got most from life whether Jesus or Edison6 Does life have infinite potentialities? Yes so far as we can conceive infinity Certainly incalculable immeasurable is the contribution and joy open to you or to me As Tagore says Life is immense7 Must pain spring from pleasure? Not always Not eual pain from eual pleasure Psychologically we seem to know pleasure largely by contrast and contrast seems necessary for our minds to make distinctions No black no white No high no low8 Are pain and pleasure eually desirable and necessary? They are both good for us if we have the will to extract the sweet from the bitter NO one need seek pain he will get plenty without searching He need not seek pleasure he will get if he gets it indirectly He needs rather to go his way regardless of both pain and pleasure Pleasure is perhaps the wrong word joy or ecstacy may be better Ecstacy is the highest of this family of words IT means such happiness that we literally seem to stand outside of ourselves in exaltation9 Is pleasure right for all but selfish for one? There is no sin or wrong in pleasure except it be at the cost of another soul or life to aggrandize ourselves by the degradation of another Selfishness is not evil it is good but it must be the larger and not the narrower selfishness A man's real self includes his parents his wife and children his friends and neighbors his countrymen all his fellowmen He should be selfish both at the center and at the circumference selfish for all I doubt that there is a real conflict but there is a harmony It is not beautiful for a man to sacrifice himself for his child and thus spoil his child Parents who do not practice give and take fairness in this relation make pigs and tyrants out of their children These children are not being brought up to face reality are they?10Can one be happy while others are miserable? Yes a callous man can have a callous happiness But a noble man cannot be nobly happy while others are miserable In that sense a man like Jesus never except for moments of rest and retreat can be happy for he had compassion upon the multitude Great lovers have a happiness higher than our ordinary happiness There is a happiness in identification of oneself with others in bearing their burdens even their sins Great souls are not worried much about happiness Wist ye not that I must be about my Father's business? Jesus and Socrates and Lincoln were not constantly concerned about heir pleasure or their happiness11 Can one be fine without great sacrifice? Not the finest For such a one has been spared great experience Such a one has not really lived He has just played at life Yet he need not be maimed by sacrifice to know reality Sacrifice is in uality as well as uantity Sacrifice may be so great as to amputate life and may be silly or futile There is sacrifice and sacrifice One need not be sadist or masochist; neither are sound persons12 Can one make great sacrifices without submerging oneself? yes wives of many great men mothers of great sons teachers of leaders have found their lives by losing their lives He that loseth his life for my sake shall find it says Jesus You would now begin to find great things for your opening soul in a good modern version of the Gospels Get one and read it slowly like any other book and receptively A seed fulfills itself by losing itself in the ground So did the men at Thermopylae13 Should one submerge oneself in sacrifice? That depends Not for the sake of sacrifice that would be masochism He that loseth his life for my sake said Jesus shall find it So says the Great Idea or the Grand Old Cause at any time A man should follow the gleam He should be wise not a fool but a mam must sometimes be a fool for the glory of God There are no better words in which to express the thought14Does not one serve most by doing what one does best? Yes if the world needs that or can use that service On the other hand it may be selfish where it is done to please oneself solely without regard to the needs of one's time or one's fellows As to art beauty the world always needs that but it flourishes best when one is part of a world that has found itself and is going somewhere when art is the expression of the time15 Is it possible to be truly unselfish? No because even Jesus fed his ego a man who dies for a cause does express himselfachieve his goal perhaps God does not ask unselfishness in an absurd sense Asceticism and self mortification and all that sort of thing are abnormal attitudes A man must be first a healthy animal Then he must be than an animal too He must be a human16 Is there any fulfillment that endures as such besides death? I doubt if death fulfills It seems to end but I doubt that it ends much Not one's influence or the influence of one's work Perhaps even the echoes of your voice may go on forever Some instrument might pick them up years or ages hence beauty is an ultimate fulfillment as is Goodness as is Truth These are ends in themselves and are for the sake of life Many things are worthwhile that are not enduring Eternity is just made of todays Glorify the hour17 Is there anything perpetual besides change? Yes the tendency to change to unroll or evolve and possibly the direction of change The fact is so that things hold together make sense is perpetual Why should we object to change? Maybe it is the essence of life18 Is passage from the sensual to the intellectual to the spiritual a correct progression of growth and if so should that growth be hastened? Why not live in all three at the same time? Why such sharp demarcations? A house has a foundation a first story and a second story Why not all three at the same time? Nor flesh helps spirit now than spirit flesh or the like is a saying of Browning's The Greeks separated flesh and spirit We moderns tend not to do so but to respect all parts of creation each in its place ow you tell me where did you get all these mind twisters anyway? Love Father Dec 1933

  9. Molly Vaughan Molly Vaughan says:

    Second time reading this book The first time I thought I was just too young to appreciate it I'm still missing something I'm afraid

  10. Bakunin Bakunin says:

    My face is set I got to make my destiny May many another youth be by me inspired to leave the snug safety of his rut and follow fortune to other landsAs I have a tendency to become overworked by irrelevant albeit it work related tasks it is nice to every now and then try to get a fresh perspective on things Evert Ruess was a young man who decided to determine his own destiny by traveling through the wilderness of Arizona and Utah This book is a collection of letters he wrote to the people that he was close to mostly his brother Waldo Ruess has ambitions of becoming a painter and his letters show a certain literary aptitude as well Although he is mostly accompanied by his burro on his adventures he also ends up meeting Indians as well as fellow travelers It would seem however that Ruess often preferred solitude over the company of others He ask his parents to send him great works of literature such as the Magic mountain Mann Don uixote etc and always tries in his letters to explain the beauty of existence While this often ends up either being pretentious or banal he sometimes hits spot onBeauty and peace have been with me wherever I have gone At night I have watched pale granite towers in the dim starlight aspiring to the powdered sky tremulous and dreamlike fantastical in the melting darkness These living dreams I wish to share with you and I want you to know that I have not forgotten p 103 Or this oneVilhjalmur Stefansson the Arctic explorer says that adventures are a sign of unpreparedness and incompetence I think he is largely right nevertheless I like adventure and enjoy taking chances when skill and fortitude play a part If we never had any adventures we would never know what stuff was in us p 140While it never really reaches the level of high artistic expression I was hoping for something along the lines of Dag Hammarskjölds Markings these expressions have an authentic feel to them which inspires me I think that too seldom one is given time to really reflect over ones life There is also something uite Zen like about Ruess and his insistence of appreciating the beauty of life

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10 thoughts on “Everett Ruess

  1. fourtriplezed fourtriplezed says:

    If forced to use one word on this book fascinating comes to mind The book itself consists of letters by Everett Reuss from the age of 16 to his disappearance as a 20 year old in the Utah desert in 1934 This is not spoiling the book as the author explains his disappearance in both the preface and first chapter of the book The author writes in the preface that Everett “was a highly complex young man” and that is shown by the letters that he wrote to friends and family Everett Ruess began his wanderings at a young age He was 16 At that age the vast majority of boys and girls have on their minds than the determination to be an outsider free spirit Study their peer group and the opposite sex is the norm Everett was different He knew that At one point he writes “My tragedy is that I don’t fit in with any type of people” He writes along the same theme periodically His parents especially his mother knew this and that may have been why they never hindered him in his uest to travel With each letter it became apparent that he was an artist with an eye to see Beauty The author makes this clear from the first chapter; a chapter he aptly calls The Beauty and the Tragedy of Everett Ruess Everett himself wrote often on his need for Beauty and his art His Blockprints to my untrained eye show a depth of sharp imagination Everett was also an avid reader He makes mention of many books he reads in the letters he writes Those that have an interest in book reading could not be anything but impressed with the scope of literature that he devoured He read some books that must surely be interesting to the modern bibliophile Some are as noted as Don uixote Some are very obscure; The Fantastic Traveller by Maude Meagher is but one example of that The Fantastic Traveller does not even have a Goodreads entry but was seemingly popular in the early 1930’s from what I can ascertainIn a letter to his father he makes mention of a book called A Short Introduction to the History of Human Stupidity by Walter B Pitkin The then nineteen year old Everett says he is mentally stimulated by it He writes a few uotes from it that he thinks will interest his father When he make mention of works such as this I find it impossible not to look up on Goodreads and other sources Just as an example I found this link about Pitkins book for anyone that may be interested Vonnegut I was told mentioned this book in The Last Interview In the end though the need for the beauty of the wilderness runs deep in his letters and this may have led to his mysterious disappearance Even those that come into contact with him sensed his needs Archaeologist Clay Locket made mention of Everett nearly killing himself trying to find vantage points on steep and wet cliffs just to paint a watercolour He “loved everything” said Lockett who also called him a “strange kid” For those of us in a comfortable suburban life being that “strange kid” maybe what the attraction of this book is all about My good friend Gordon Wilson has a keen eye for books such as this and wrote Ruess was a wandering soul that “we can all relate to at some level” Well said Highly recommended for those that like travel

  2. Ron Ron says:

    This is a hard book to sum up in a few words Fascinating and compelling yes; heartbreaking often; hair raising sometimes; exasperating occasionally Mostly it is a vivid reminder of what it is to be still very young naive and adventuresome It's also a book that's very hard to put downThe reader of course knows from the start that Everett Ruess disappears at the age of 21 while on a walkabout somewhere near the Colorado River in the remote 1930s wilderness of southern Utah Gifted bright and almost painfully sensitive he writes letters home that are sweetly poignant thoughtful opinionated and rapturously descriptive of the natural environment he loves Starting at the age of 16 while still a high school student in Hollywood California he journeys to Carmel Arizona and the Sierras Leaving UCLA after one unhappy semester he returns to the Four Corners region of Arizona and drifts northward into Utah where he follows the Escalante down to the Colorado and then vanishesA lover of classical music a reader of books poet writer water colorist and block print maker he considers himself very much a misfit in a world of conformity where people live lives of uiet desperation pursuing material goals that make them unhappy and unfulfilled Torn between his desire for companionship and his love of wilderness solitude he appreciates warm and welcoming company wherever he happens upon it and seeks it out when he can sometimes introducing himself to established artists such as photographers Edward Weston and Ansel Adams During visits to the home of painter Maynard Dixon in San Francisco he is befriended and photographed by Dixon's wife Dorothea Lange One of these photographs eventually appears in a missing persons report in a publication of the Los Angeles Police DepartmentIt's easy to go on and on about this book The letters provide such a rich psychological portrait of this young man full of interesting contradictions and curious prophecies of his eventual fate Meanwhile there is the mystery of his disappearance and the various theories and speculation about what may have happened to him which are also included by the book's authorI am happy to recommend this book to anyone interested in the West stories about coming of age and self reliance rhapsodic descriptions of nature personal adventures the desert Native Americans and unsolved mysteries As companion volumes I'd also suggest Edward Abbey's Desert Solitaire and Eliot Porter's excellent collection of photographs The Place No One Knew Glen Canyon on the Colorado

  3. Ogross Ogross says:

    Read years ago and something made it come to mind today A wonderful and heartbreaking collection of letters written by a young artist wandering the Southwest Merged reviewAs I was reading Into the Wild I kept thinking how much Chris McCandless' story reminded me of this biography about Everett Ruess No surprise when Into the Wild had a whole chapter about that very same comparison I loved this story especially reading all the letters Everett wrote during his time traveling around the Southwest in the 1930's Both books truly touched some part of me that yearns to leave all the trappings of our consumerist society behind I thought anyone who read this would understand how I felt but I distinctly remember Rick surprising me with his non interest in the book He doesn't even remember reading it now

  4. Owen Curtsinger Owen Curtsinger says:

    Reading Everett's letters puts you right back in the restless uestioning that we often face around age 20 where am I going? What kind of people do I enjoy being around? How do I want to spend my time and energy and what are the forces that inspire me most to do so? His musings put me right back in that era of life showcasing the naivety of youth the struggle to find a place and people that make one feel at home and the harsh uestioning of the forces that shape a life As such reading the letters is an experience that ranges from exasperating to nostalgic to thought provoking In Everett's case however this is tempered by that fact his letters are written far elouently than I ever could have hoped to write at that age and the backdrop of his wanderings are far wilder and awe inspiring than the suburban environment of my late teenage years Reading his letters are like walking and chatting with him on a long desert walkAn eually important component of this book is the essays that explore Everett's disappearance and the search to find him; the fact that he vanished in one of the most rugged and remote parts of the country and was never uncovered seems mysterious and unnerving in our comfortable age of GPS and forensics technology If reading Everett's letters are like walking with him then these concluding essays are like a window into an wilder and sparsely populated period of the American West

  5. Chad Chad says:

    Unbeknownst to you the teenager you pass on the street may be an artist a writer and the main character in a great adventure And there are others who feel the Utah's red rock desert is so beautiful that it almost kills a sensitive person who immerses himself in it

  6. Jan Lynch Jan Lynch says:

    Beauty is an ultimate fulfillment as is Goodness as is Truth These are ends in themselves and are for the sake of life Many things are worthwhile that are not enduring Eternity is just made of todays Glorify the hour Advice from Everett Ruess's father 123Live gaily live deeply and wrest from life some of its infinite possibilities Everett Ruess 155For anyone who enjoyed Into the Wild this book referenced by Jon Krakauer is a must read Like McCandless Ruess abandons society in favor of becoming a wanderer but that is where similarity between the two ends Where McCandless's journey seems as much about running away from things as toward something Ruess's journey is different He is seeking beauty not running away from unhappiness Artistic and intelligent Ruess was born 1914 and raised by his painter mother and poetminister father Extraordinarily sensitive Ruess seeks fulfillment in tramping through the unexplored vastness of the West and while many parents would discourage this Ruess's parents support him A Vagabond for Beauty details Ruess's story in his own words through excerpts from letters and journals with Rusho providing only such information as is needed to tie all together The work sings when Ruess does the talking; after his disappearance the life goes out of the book I missed his voice which points to a bigger loss What might Ruess have become had he lived? I'm sorry we will never know

  7. Vicky Vicky says:

    I reread W L Rusho's Everett Ruess Vagabond for Beauty the letters of Ruess and the story of the various searches for him after he disappeared in 1934 This book is one of my favorites and even prompted many years ago a hike down into Davis Gulch to follow Ruess' last trail as it turns out he was miles away on the other side of the Colorado when he was murdered His writings about and passion for the canyon country remain a testament to the strong feelings this country evokes

  8. WhizKid WhizKid says:

    The letter between Everett Christopher Ruess Everett asks uestions and his father reply back in a letter1 Is service the true end of life? No but rather happiness through service Only as we play our part as a part of the whole aware of the interrelationedness do we really and fully live You and I are like the right hand or the right eye or the big toe we are grotesue when living apart2 Can a strong mind maintain independence and strength if it is not rooted in material independence?Yes as many great souls prove They were not independent Dependence and independence are alike harmful to the best life No dependent or independent man can play a high part in life but only the interdependent man Great souls today have issued a Declaration of Human Interdependence3 Do all things follow the attainment of Truth? No not unless you create a new definition of the truth It takes all three ideas of the reason to define the whole of culture or to define God He whose life is exclusively devoted to Truth or to Goodness or to Beauty is a very fractional man This age is in trouble because it has exaggerated truth it is lopsided There is no ultimate conflict when all three are stressed and as Aristotle says we see life sanely and see it whole4 Is bodily love empty or to be forgotten? No it is a part of life It is not all of life I don't see that it should ever be outgrown but it changes form; it begins animal and always remains healthily animal but it's refined and sublimated5 Can one ask too much of life? Yes many do We should have faith in life in cause and effect in action and reaction We owe much to the past than any one of us can give to the present or to the future It is not for us to play highway robber and hold up life The great souls probably never ask such a uestion But the greatest givers have got most from life whether Jesus or Edison6 Does life have infinite potentialities? Yes so far as we can conceive infinity Certainly incalculable immeasurable is the contribution and joy open to you or to me As Tagore says Life is immense7 Must pain spring from pleasure? Not always Not eual pain from eual pleasure Psychologically we seem to know pleasure largely by contrast and contrast seems necessary for our minds to make distinctions No black no white No high no low8 Are pain and pleasure eually desirable and necessary? They are both good for us if we have the will to extract the sweet from the bitter NO one need seek pain he will get plenty without searching He need not seek pleasure he will get if he gets it indirectly He needs rather to go his way regardless of both pain and pleasure Pleasure is perhaps the wrong word joy or ecstacy may be better Ecstacy is the highest of this family of words IT means such happiness that we literally seem to stand outside of ourselves in exaltation9 Is pleasure right for all but selfish for one? There is no sin or wrong in pleasure except it be at the cost of another soul or life to aggrandize ourselves by the degradation of another Selfishness is not evil it is good but it must be the larger and not the narrower selfishness A man's real self includes his parents his wife and children his friends and neighbors his countrymen all his fellowmen He should be selfish both at the center and at the circumference selfish for all I doubt that there is a real conflict but there is a harmony It is not beautiful for a man to sacrifice himself for his child and thus spoil his child Parents who do not practice give and take fairness in this relation make pigs and tyrants out of their children These children are not being brought up to face reality are they?10Can one be happy while others are miserable? Yes a callous man can have a callous happiness But a noble man cannot be nobly happy while others are miserable In that sense a man like Jesus never except for moments of rest and retreat can be happy for he had compassion upon the multitude Great lovers have a happiness higher than our ordinary happiness There is a happiness in identification of oneself with others in bearing their burdens even their sins Great souls are not worried much about happiness Wist ye not that I must be about my Father's business? Jesus and Socrates and Lincoln were not constantly concerned about heir pleasure or their happiness11 Can one be fine without great sacrifice? Not the finest For such a one has been spared great experience Such a one has not really lived He has just played at life Yet he need not be maimed by sacrifice to know reality Sacrifice is in uality as well as uantity Sacrifice may be so great as to amputate life and may be silly or futile There is sacrifice and sacrifice One need not be sadist or masochist; neither are sound persons12 Can one make great sacrifices without submerging oneself? yes wives of many great men mothers of great sons teachers of leaders have found their lives by losing their lives He that loseth his life for my sake shall find it says Jesus You would now begin to find great things for your opening soul in a good modern version of the Gospels Get one and read it slowly like any other book and receptively A seed fulfills itself by losing itself in the ground So did the men at Thermopylae13 Should one submerge oneself in sacrifice? That depends Not for the sake of sacrifice that would be masochism He that loseth his life for my sake said Jesus shall find it So says the Great Idea or the Grand Old Cause at any time A man should follow the gleam He should be wise not a fool but a mam must sometimes be a fool for the glory of God There are no better words in which to express the thought14Does not one serve most by doing what one does best? Yes if the world needs that or can use that service On the other hand it may be selfish where it is done to please oneself solely without regard to the needs of one's time or one's fellows As to art beauty the world always needs that but it flourishes best when one is part of a world that has found itself and is going somewhere when art is the expression of the time15 Is it possible to be truly unselfish? No because even Jesus fed his ego a man who dies for a cause does express himselfachieve his goal perhaps God does not ask unselfishness in an absurd sense Asceticism and self mortification and all that sort of thing are abnormal attitudes A man must be first a healthy animal Then he must be than an animal too He must be a human16 Is there any fulfillment that endures as such besides death? I doubt if death fulfills It seems to end but I doubt that it ends much Not one's influence or the influence of one's work Perhaps even the echoes of your voice may go on forever Some instrument might pick them up years or ages hence beauty is an ultimate fulfillment as is Goodness as is Truth These are ends in themselves and are for the sake of life Many things are worthwhile that are not enduring Eternity is just made of todays Glorify the hour17 Is there anything perpetual besides change? Yes the tendency to change to unroll or evolve and possibly the direction of change The fact is so that things hold together make sense is perpetual Why should we object to change? Maybe it is the essence of life18 Is passage from the sensual to the intellectual to the spiritual a correct progression of growth and if so should that growth be hastened? Why not live in all three at the same time? Why such sharp demarcations? A house has a foundation a first story and a second story Why not all three at the same time? Nor flesh helps spirit now than spirit flesh or the like is a saying of Browning's The Greeks separated flesh and spirit We moderns tend not to do so but to respect all parts of creation each in its place ow you tell me where did you get all these mind twisters anyway? Love Father Dec 1933

  9. Molly Vaughan Molly Vaughan says:

    Second time reading this book The first time I thought I was just too young to appreciate it I'm still missing something I'm afraid

  10. Bakunin Bakunin says:

    My face is set I got to make my destiny May many another youth be by me inspired to leave the snug safety of his rut and follow fortune to other landsAs I have a tendency to become overworked by irrelevant albeit it work related tasks it is nice to every now and then try to get a fresh perspective on things Evert Ruess was a young man who decided to determine his own destiny by traveling through the wilderness of Arizona and Utah This book is a collection of letters he wrote to the people that he was close to mostly his brother Waldo Ruess has ambitions of becoming a painter and his letters show a certain literary aptitude as well Although he is mostly accompanied by his burro on his adventures he also ends up meeting Indians as well as fellow travelers It would seem however that Ruess often preferred solitude over the company of others He ask his parents to send him great works of literature such as the Magic mountain Mann Don uixote etc and always tries in his letters to explain the beauty of existence While this often ends up either being pretentious or banal he sometimes hits spot onBeauty and peace have been with me wherever I have gone At night I have watched pale granite towers in the dim starlight aspiring to the powdered sky tremulous and dreamlike fantastical in the melting darkness These living dreams I wish to share with you and I want you to know that I have not forgotten p 103 Or this oneVilhjalmur Stefansson the Arctic explorer says that adventures are a sign of unpreparedness and incompetence I think he is largely right nevertheless I like adventure and enjoy taking chances when skill and fortitude play a part If we never had any adventures we would never know what stuff was in us p 140While it never really reaches the level of high artistic expression I was hoping for something along the lines of Dag Hammarskjölds Markings these expressions have an authentic feel to them which inspires me I think that too seldom one is given time to really reflect over ones life There is also something uite Zen like about Ruess and his insistence of appreciating the beauty of life

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