Young Man with a Horn Kindle Ñ with a Epub Ú

Young Man with a Horn Kindle Ñ with a Epub Ú



10 thoughts on “Young Man with a Horn

  1. Josh Josh says:

    There s nothing in the world so beautiful and so astonishing as the spectacle of a really disordered mind As an amateur jazz musician that s even pushing it in my earlier years, this statement reminds me of what personifies jazz.I say this because to me jazz itself is somewhat of an oxymoron As with all other music, there can be an order, a balance to it, but there can also be disorder There aren t many other styles of music, in my opinion, that can be so disorderly and so beautiful at the same time The mind of a jazz musician is oftentimes eccentric, sad, full of anger or madness at least in the early days and it shows in the music The emotion with a few notes or too many notes is almost unsurpassed.In Baker s Young Man with a Horn , the characters speak the language, drink the poison and live the hell It s main character, Rick Martin, traverses the pages with first optimism and then despair When I think of the 1920 s 1930 s music scene, this book describes it well She draws out Martin s character so well you know what to expect, but you don t know how it s going to get there If I had been born into a different kind of world, at another place, in another time, everything changed, the name Martin might have lasted along with the names of the other devout ones, the ones who cared for music and put it down so that it s still good and always will be But what chance has a jig man got He plays his little tune, and then it s over, and he alone can know what went into it This is sad but so is everything, and in the end there is another thing to say about it The good thing, finally, is to lead a devoted life, even if it swings around and strikes you in the face


  2. Sara Sara says:

    I picked this up because a Dorothy Baker and b there were some interesting stories attached to the film adaptation namely, the Jean Spangler disappearance, and Lauren Bacall s oft talked about role as a mad lesbian femme fatale.What a marvelous book and so startlingly different from Cassandra at the Wedding Take that, writing workshop art police Even proof that you can write about gays and jazz and alcoholism and shockingly not be gay or an alcoholic or a jazz musician, although maybe Baker had a few aliases It s oddly structured in that most of the conflict and drama come in the last fifty pages Unfortunately, the movie stretches those fifty pages into a ninety minute combo of whitewashing and schmaltzy moralizing with a side of good music Bacall gets in a few zingers though, far too few In fact, read the book and watch this clip and you can skip the movie altogether.


  3. J.M. Hushour J.M. Hushour says:

    Rick was a marked man a lifelong sucker for syncopation If you re not a fan of jazz, you will probably like this a lot less than if you were Horn follows precocious white boy Rick Martin through his shitty childhood in lower class L.A in the 1910s and his rise as an astonishing trumpeter during the Roaring Twenties Interestingly, the book is as much a dense psychological study of the artist s travails as it is a story of a poor white kid mixing it big in jazz troupes that were largely African American That actually doesn t matter at all, since the color of his skin doesn t mean shit to his teachers and peers he just simply respect him for his talent and friendship So, it s much about the music, the people Martin meets, and the troubled medical student he eventually falls in love with It s a fine and dandy book with some nice narrative hooks by Baker and a language all its own.


  4. rosamund rosamund says:

    Dorothy Baker s first novel follows the short life of Rick Martin, a virtuoso jazz musician at a time when jazz was not taken seriously Rick Martin is white, but most of his friend and fellow musicians are black Martin intuitively understand that black musicians play the best and most innovative jazz, and this allows him to move beyond the prejudices and racism of the 1920s The novel is narrated by an unnamed man, a friend and admirer of Rick, although the focus is exclusively on Rick s life Baker s main interest is in music in the development of a musician and the single minded obsession of someone who is a passionate and talented artist The story itself does not feel new we are all familiar with stories about talented people who drink themselves to death but Baker s writing is fresh and insightful We care about Rick, and the people in his life, particularly his best and oldest friend, Smoke Jordan, a black jazz musician who introduced Rick to jazz clubs Although the narratives suffers from 1930s racist language and attitudes, Young Man with a Horn is full of measured and nuanced portrayals of black characters, which allows the novel to feel modern and gives the jazz world depth and insight Although it is not a novel about racism, an examination of racist attitudes is constantly in the background of the text For the most part, though, this is a novel about the transformative power of music and is a celebration of jazz I did not find it is revolutionary or full of emotion as Baker s last novel, Cassandra at the Wedding which was written twenty years after Young Man with a Horn, but in both she creates an authentic and compelling narrative voice, and both feel unique She is an astonishingly talented writer.


  5. Nicholas During Nicholas During says:

    Young Man with a Horn takes a long hard look at the individual whose life is controlled around art, and then of course must suffer for it, in a very American way What makes it good, is it acknowledges this, and even admits that writing is not necessarily the best form of art that creates a national culture In this case, and Baker I think is saying in America s case, it is jazz Which is pretty cool for a reader who isn t really that in to jazz In fact, I hadn t heard of Bix Beiderbecke before but I m definitely a fan now And whether jazz is the epitome of American culture or not though I think there s a strong argument to say it is music, in all its C20th forms it also gives Baker some serious advantages when writing this book One is she can tackle race in a new way for a white person writing in 1938, that jazz is great and American and new and creative and improvisational and from the heart and can be felt and while jazz is definitely black originally and maybe at its heart, it also crosses the racial divide, both for audience and artist And secondly jazz provides a new language, not just musically, but linguistically Mostly through African Americans but also a new America language sprouting out of early jazz And since this book is about young jazz musicians, she s aloud to let it rip.The other theme, of artist controlled by his art and unable to fit into the real world and therefore must suffer and die, is not new at all, think of Vincent van Gough and Caravaggio, etc But I think Baker does a good job with it here since it is an original American artist, partially because of his art Russell Martin has talent, he doesn t study music, doesn t have to go to college, doesn t need to know the history of classical music or politics of the day He can just pick up the chorus and verses, and then when its his turn turn them into something new every night of the week He doesn t need to explain it, the audience recognizes the standards he s playing, but they also know that he is going to make it his own And even he doesn t know how yet This is a pretty good point on inspiration I think And its hard to see the contemporary set of young authors writing fiction about young authors trying to become young authors has much to say about their inspiration Perhaps I m being too harsh But Martin doesn t have an answer either, he just is and the music flows through him and changes as it does I recently went to hear Tom McCarthy talk about his idea of literature and this is pretty similar to what he thinks Artists aren t coming up with new ideas, they are picking up on universal themes and changing them in their own expression and form Russell Martin, Bix Beiderbecke, and Dorothy Baker all do that as well.


  6. Matt Matt says:

    Underrated, arguably the first Jazz novel in America ever Subtle, tough minded, racially wise, and stylistically concise to the point of terse, which is kind of the problem for me I d have appreciated it if Baker had cut loose to describe Rick Martin and the band s cutting loose I appreciate the power of understatement, but if you re writing about early 30 s jazz, why not go all out Make it sing on the page Oh, write that thing Here s a couplea clips from the tragic, brilliant Bix Beiderbecke, the inspiration though NOT the basis for Baker s protagonist So if you re going to write about the guy who made this glorious music none other than Satchmo himself said, re Bix, those pretty notes just went right through me you may as well swing in a mid tempo kinda way, even if it s only on the page.


  7. AC AC says:

    Disappointing I didn t quite buy into the tone, and a bit hollywoodish It could be it was just me, though.


  8. Daniel Polansky Daniel Polansky says:

    Hoo Excellent Wait, this is the same Baker who wrote the likewise excellent but otherwise in tone, structure, character and story entirely dissimilar Cassandra at the Wedding Weird Weird world You haven t even written one stellar novel, and she wrote two WHAT ARE YOU DOING WITH YOUR LIFE Right, well, basically every jazz clich was, so I gather, created in this book, so much so that later generations this came out in 38 of Jazz aficionados were prone to look back on it with some contempt Which is too bad, because it s the rare sort of book which inspired a lot of imitators but still holds its original power Baker understands jazz as an art form, writes about it intelligently, but than that she understands what it is to be driven by the act of creation beyond the capacity of the human organism, to focus the entirety of your existence on the single, pointless activity of art, art for its own sake, art for its creators sake, art irrelevant to the audience I ll admit I m just pretentious enough to feel like it had some relevance to my own life and trade Also, that s a hell of a last line Damn, but this woman could write.


  9. Alex Alex says:

    Anyone who knows anything about jazz knows that most of the musicians lived extremely hard lives, often died very young, and dealt with heavy substance abuse.This semi biographical novel lays it all out in under 200 pages I would have appreciated a bit insight into the music itself but as a personal story, it works well.


  10. Jacob Jacob says:

    A beautifully written love letter to jazz music.


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Young Man with a Horn [BOOKS] ✯ Young Man with a Horn By Dorothy Baker – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Rick Martin loved music and the music loved him He could pick up a tune so quickly that it didn t matter to the Cotton Club boss that he was underage, or to the guys in the band that he was just a whi Rick Martin loved music with a Epub Ú and the music loved him He could pick up a tune so quickly that it didn Young Man Kindle - t matter to the Cotton Club boss that he was underage, or to the guys in the band that he was Man with a MOBI · just a white kid He started out in the slums of LA with nothing, and he ended up on top of the game in the speakeasies and nightclubs of New York But while talent and drive are all you need to make it in music, they aren t enough to make it through a life Dorothy Baker s Young Man with a Horn is widely regarded as the first jazz novel, and it pulses with the music that defined an era Baker took her inspiration from the artistry though not the life of legendary horn player Bix Beiderbecke, and the novel went on to be adapted into a successful movie starring Kirk Douglas, Lauren Bacall, and Doris Day.

10 thoughts on “Young Man with a Horn

  1. Josh Josh says:

    There s nothing in the world so beautiful and so astonishing as the spectacle of a really disordered mind As an amateur jazz musician that s even pushing it in my earlier years, this statement reminds me of what personifies jazz.I say this because to me jazz itself is somewhat of an oxymoron As with all other music, there can be an order, a balance to it, but there can also be disorder There aren t many other styles of music, in my opinion, that can be so disorderly and so beautiful at the same time The mind of a jazz musician is oftentimes eccentric, sad, full of anger or madness at least in the early days and it shows in the music The emotion with a few notes or too many notes is almost unsurpassed.In Baker s Young Man with a Horn , the characters speak the language, drink the poison and live the hell It s main character, Rick Martin, traverses the pages with first optimism and then despair When I think of the 1920 s 1930 s music scene, this book describes it well She draws out Martin s character so well you know what to expect, but you don t know how it s going to get there If I had been born into a different kind of world, at another place, in another time, everything changed, the name Martin might have lasted along with the names of the other devout ones, the ones who cared for music and put it down so that it s still good and always will be But what chance has a jig man got He plays his little tune, and then it s over, and he alone can know what went into it This is sad but so is everything, and in the end there is another thing to say about it The good thing, finally, is to lead a devoted life, even if it swings around and strikes you in the face

  2. Sara Sara says:

    I picked this up because a Dorothy Baker and b there were some interesting stories attached to the film adaptation namely, the Jean Spangler disappearance, and Lauren Bacall s oft talked about role as a mad lesbian femme fatale.What a marvelous book and so startlingly different from Cassandra at the Wedding Take that, writing workshop art police Even proof that you can write about gays and jazz and alcoholism and shockingly not be gay or an alcoholic or a jazz musician, although maybe Baker had a few aliases It s oddly structured in that most of the conflict and drama come in the last fifty pages Unfortunately, the movie stretches those fifty pages into a ninety minute combo of whitewashing and schmaltzy moralizing with a side of good music Bacall gets in a few zingers though, far too few In fact, read the book and watch this clip and you can skip the movie altogether.

  3. J.M. Hushour J.M. Hushour says:

    Rick was a marked man a lifelong sucker for syncopation If you re not a fan of jazz, you will probably like this a lot less than if you were Horn follows precocious white boy Rick Martin through his shitty childhood in lower class L.A in the 1910s and his rise as an astonishing trumpeter during the Roaring Twenties Interestingly, the book is as much a dense psychological study of the artist s travails as it is a story of a poor white kid mixing it big in jazz troupes that were largely African American That actually doesn t matter at all, since the color of his skin doesn t mean shit to his teachers and peers he just simply respect him for his talent and friendship So, it s much about the music, the people Martin meets, and the troubled medical student he eventually falls in love with It s a fine and dandy book with some nice narrative hooks by Baker and a language all its own.

  4. rosamund rosamund says:

    Dorothy Baker s first novel follows the short life of Rick Martin, a virtuoso jazz musician at a time when jazz was not taken seriously Rick Martin is white, but most of his friend and fellow musicians are black Martin intuitively understand that black musicians play the best and most innovative jazz, and this allows him to move beyond the prejudices and racism of the 1920s The novel is narrated by an unnamed man, a friend and admirer of Rick, although the focus is exclusively on Rick s life Baker s main interest is in music in the development of a musician and the single minded obsession of someone who is a passionate and talented artist The story itself does not feel new we are all familiar with stories about talented people who drink themselves to death but Baker s writing is fresh and insightful We care about Rick, and the people in his life, particularly his best and oldest friend, Smoke Jordan, a black jazz musician who introduced Rick to jazz clubs Although the narratives suffers from 1930s racist language and attitudes, Young Man with a Horn is full of measured and nuanced portrayals of black characters, which allows the novel to feel modern and gives the jazz world depth and insight Although it is not a novel about racism, an examination of racist attitudes is constantly in the background of the text For the most part, though, this is a novel about the transformative power of music and is a celebration of jazz I did not find it is revolutionary or full of emotion as Baker s last novel, Cassandra at the Wedding which was written twenty years after Young Man with a Horn, but in both she creates an authentic and compelling narrative voice, and both feel unique She is an astonishingly talented writer.

  5. Nicholas During Nicholas During says:

    Young Man with a Horn takes a long hard look at the individual whose life is controlled around art, and then of course must suffer for it, in a very American way What makes it good, is it acknowledges this, and even admits that writing is not necessarily the best form of art that creates a national culture In this case, and Baker I think is saying in America s case, it is jazz Which is pretty cool for a reader who isn t really that in to jazz In fact, I hadn t heard of Bix Beiderbecke before but I m definitely a fan now And whether jazz is the epitome of American culture or not though I think there s a strong argument to say it is music, in all its C20th forms it also gives Baker some serious advantages when writing this book One is she can tackle race in a new way for a white person writing in 1938, that jazz is great and American and new and creative and improvisational and from the heart and can be felt and while jazz is definitely black originally and maybe at its heart, it also crosses the racial divide, both for audience and artist And secondly jazz provides a new language, not just musically, but linguistically Mostly through African Americans but also a new America language sprouting out of early jazz And since this book is about young jazz musicians, she s aloud to let it rip.The other theme, of artist controlled by his art and unable to fit into the real world and therefore must suffer and die, is not new at all, think of Vincent van Gough and Caravaggio, etc But I think Baker does a good job with it here since it is an original American artist, partially because of his art Russell Martin has talent, he doesn t study music, doesn t have to go to college, doesn t need to know the history of classical music or politics of the day He can just pick up the chorus and verses, and then when its his turn turn them into something new every night of the week He doesn t need to explain it, the audience recognizes the standards he s playing, but they also know that he is going to make it his own And even he doesn t know how yet This is a pretty good point on inspiration I think And its hard to see the contemporary set of young authors writing fiction about young authors trying to become young authors has much to say about their inspiration Perhaps I m being too harsh But Martin doesn t have an answer either, he just is and the music flows through him and changes as it does I recently went to hear Tom McCarthy talk about his idea of literature and this is pretty similar to what he thinks Artists aren t coming up with new ideas, they are picking up on universal themes and changing them in their own expression and form Russell Martin, Bix Beiderbecke, and Dorothy Baker all do that as well.

  6. Matt Matt says:

    Underrated, arguably the first Jazz novel in America ever Subtle, tough minded, racially wise, and stylistically concise to the point of terse, which is kind of the problem for me I d have appreciated it if Baker had cut loose to describe Rick Martin and the band s cutting loose I appreciate the power of understatement, but if you re writing about early 30 s jazz, why not go all out Make it sing on the page Oh, write that thing Here s a couplea clips from the tragic, brilliant Bix Beiderbecke, the inspiration though NOT the basis for Baker s protagonist So if you re going to write about the guy who made this glorious music none other than Satchmo himself said, re Bix, those pretty notes just went right through me you may as well swing in a mid tempo kinda way, even if it s only on the page.

  7. AC AC says:

    Disappointing I didn t quite buy into the tone, and a bit hollywoodish It could be it was just me, though.

  8. Daniel Polansky Daniel Polansky says:

    Hoo Excellent Wait, this is the same Baker who wrote the likewise excellent but otherwise in tone, structure, character and story entirely dissimilar Cassandra at the Wedding Weird Weird world You haven t even written one stellar novel, and she wrote two WHAT ARE YOU DOING WITH YOUR LIFE Right, well, basically every jazz clich was, so I gather, created in this book, so much so that later generations this came out in 38 of Jazz aficionados were prone to look back on it with some contempt Which is too bad, because it s the rare sort of book which inspired a lot of imitators but still holds its original power Baker understands jazz as an art form, writes about it intelligently, but than that she understands what it is to be driven by the act of creation beyond the capacity of the human organism, to focus the entirety of your existence on the single, pointless activity of art, art for its own sake, art for its creators sake, art irrelevant to the audience I ll admit I m just pretentious enough to feel like it had some relevance to my own life and trade Also, that s a hell of a last line Damn, but this woman could write.

  9. Alex Alex says:

    Anyone who knows anything about jazz knows that most of the musicians lived extremely hard lives, often died very young, and dealt with heavy substance abuse.This semi biographical novel lays it all out in under 200 pages I would have appreciated a bit insight into the music itself but as a personal story, it works well.

  10. Jacob Jacob says:

    A beautifully written love letter to jazz music.

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