Shoal of Time: A History of the Hawaiian Islands PDF/EPUB

Shoal of Time: A History of the Hawaiian Islands PDF/EPUB

Shoal of Time: A History of the Hawaiian Islands [BOOKS] ✭ Shoal of Time: A History of the Hawaiian Islands By Gavan Daws – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Gavan Daws remarkable achievement is to free Hawaiian history from the dust of antiquity Based on years of work in the documentary sources, Shoal of Time emerges as the most readable of all Hawaiian h Gavan Daws Time: A eBook ✓ remarkable achievement is to free Hawaiian history from the dust of antiquity Based on years of work in the documentary sources, Shoal of Time emerges as the most readable of all Hawaiian histories.


10 thoughts on “Shoal of Time: A History of the Hawaiian Islands

  1. Scot Scot says:

    This book is widely considered to be the definitive text when it comes to the modern history of Hawai i Certainly, no other text attempts to take on such a broad swathe of history in such detail If you re interested in the history of Hawai i and or the imperialist history of the U.S in the Pacific, Shoal of Time is a must read However, beware, I found that the book has some pretty big flaws.First of all, every historical account can only be told from the perspective of the historian who tell This book is widely considered to be the definitive text when it comes to the modern history of Hawai i Certainly, no other text attempts to take on such a broad swathe of history in such detail If you re interested in the history of Hawai i and or the imperialist history of the U.S in the Pacific, Shoal of Time is a must read However, beware, I found that the book has some pretty big flaws.First of all, every historical account can only be told from the perspective of the historian who tells it, and this historian is definitely one who has an all s well that ends well point of view about the colonization of Hawai i and all that was lost in the process In addition there are some historical inaccuracies and exclusions that make a real difference to one s understanding of just what, exactly, happened here.On the second point, Daws gives short shrift to what many refer to as the Great Dying, the historical sweep of 80 or so years during whichthan 95% of the Hawaiian people died, due largely to contracting diseases brought to Hawai i by it s colonizers and to which Hawaiians had no immunity This catastrophe could not but have shaped the worldview of the Hawaiian people, including our relationship to our religion and religious leaders, opening the doors to many significant changes that are presented as though they were easily chosen by Hawaiians For instance, when everyone around you is dying, you might think your gods were failing you, making the notion of trying on a new god or two kind of appealing, especially when the missionaries bringing you the word of said god are taking advantage of the situation and suggesting that you are all dying of sin.Also on this point, Daws at one juncture suggests that plantation life in Hawai i was similar to that of the antebellum southeastern U.S but for, though not in so many words, the slavery and threats to white women by black men causing unrest and acts of retaliation like lynchings I accept that slavery is different than peonage, which isalong the lines of what immigrant workers experienced in Hawai i, but the notion that lynchings in the south were acts of retaliation is just b.s The whole notion of the sexually depraved black man is a myth created by white men in the south in order to justify acts of violence that were really committed in order to intimidate slaves and prevent them from rebelling not to mention subsequent generations of African Americans in order to quell challenges to white supremacy I d call that a pretty big gaff, and one that reveals a lot about the Daws point of view on issues of race That point of view comes across now and then throughout, though I believe unintentionally But, again, all in all, no other book goes as far, nor into as much detail, at least where English language resources are concerned, as this one For a history of Hawai i that delves into Hawaiian language resources which tell a very different story, check out Aloha Betrayed by Noenoe Silva in my books


  2. Dan Dan says:

    4.5 star review.If you want to gain insight into the extraordinary human diversity of Hawaii, this is a fantastic read This one volume history, now 40 years old, covers Hawaii from Captain Cook s arrival to Barack Obama s birth I found the book to be highly informative and very well written Because it covers so much, the stories are at best vignettes but there are so many nationalities represented in Hawaii s history that it is absorbing The middle to latter portions of the book are well doc 4.5 star review.If you want to gain insight into the extraordinary human diversity of Hawaii, this is a fantastic read This one volume history, now 40 years old, covers Hawaii from Captain Cook s arrival to Barack Obama s birth I found the book to be highly informative and very well written Because it covers so much, the stories are at best vignettes but there are so many nationalities represented in Hawaii s history that it is absorbing The middle to latter portions of the book are well documented, the earlier portions are thinly referenced but that is to be expected If you want to understand the role that the missionaries played or if you want to know what a horrible person Sanford Dole was, this book tells some relatable stories While the book is not written from a native Hawaiian perspective it harbors a good deal of disdain for the white American imperialists, justifiably I might add Otherwise 5 stars, but a little dated


  3. Bruce Bruce says:

    Shoal of Time is an ok introduction to Hawaiian history, thorough in some areas, but glaringly thin and or dated in others Only recommended for background reading as part of a broader palette of histories, texts and cultural texts offering differing viewpoints.Other books and historical texts that I recommend for acomplete cultural and historical view include The Voices of Eden All Volumes of The Hawaiian Journal of History Hawaiian Historical Society For Whom the Stars Must We Shoal of Time is an ok introduction to Hawaiian history, thorough in some areas, but glaringly thin and or dated in others Only recommended for background reading as part of a broader palette of histories, texts and cultural texts offering differing viewpoints.Other books and historical texts that I recommend for acomplete cultural and historical view include The Voices of Eden All Volumes of The Hawaiian Journal of History Hawaiian Historical Society For Whom the Stars Must We Wait in Dispair Anything written by Mary Kawena Pukui but particularly including The Hawaiian Dictionary The Polynesian Family System in Ka u Place Names of Hawaii Handy, Handy and Pukui s Native Planters in Old Hawaii The Fornander collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folklore , Volumes IV, V and VIAnything written by Samual Kamakau but particularly Ruling Chiefs of Hawai i Anything written by Patrick Vinton Kirch but particularly On the Road of the Winds A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawai i The Evolution of Polynesian Chiefdoms Unwritten Literature of Hawaii Hawaii s Forgotten History Voyage of Rediscovery An Ocean in Mind We the Navigators N Inoa H k Presstime in Hawaii Bishop Museum BulletinsI m missing a ton of other titles and authors that should be on this list including several covering the plantation era, post world war II and Hawaiian renaissance but the above is not a bad start


  4. Jeffrey Jeffrey says:

    Hands down the best one volume political history of modern Hawaii ever written It s difficult to write a history of the islands since Captain Cook s arrival through US annexation and statehood without taking sides in the struggle between the natives and haoles and the book s point of view definitely does have its clear heroes and villains but Daws makes an honest effort to provide context for all the warring factions in the book and avoids turning it into a one sided screed as it could ha Hands down the best one volume political history of modern Hawaii ever written It s difficult to write a history of the islands since Captain Cook s arrival through US annexation and statehood without taking sides in the struggle between the natives and haoles and the book s point of view definitely does have its clear heroes and villains but Daws makes an honest effort to provide context for all the warring factions in the book and avoids turning it into a one sided screed as it could have been Two warnings to prospective readers One this is a political history, not a cultural one, so don t read it to learn about native customs and traditions Second the paperback edition has no pictures, maps or illustrations and this is a book that would deeply benefit from having them.These caveats aside, the book is highly recommended to anyone with an interest in the history of Hawaii from 1778 to statehood in 1959


  5. James James says:

    After living in Hawaii for 4 years, I got sick of not being able to answer questions from friends and family about the history of the islands I was looking for a readable book that would take me from Captain Cook to statehood, which is exactly what Daws has written.When I was looking for books, a found a few reviews of this volume that said it was biased against Native Hawaiians, so I was cautious when I started reading After getting through a few chapters, I realized that the problem is not t After living in Hawaii for 4 years, I got sick of not being able to answer questions from friends and family about the history of the islands I was looking for a readable book that would take me from Captain Cook to statehood, which is exactly what Daws has written.When I was looking for books, a found a few reviews of this volume that said it was biased against Native Hawaiians, so I was cautious when I started reading After getting through a few chapters, I realized that the problem is not that Daws is unfair to Native Hawaiians, but that he is brutally honest about all parties involved in Hawaii s complex history For every time he points out a poor political decision made by the Hawaiian monarchy, he also makes sure to note that many of the white business men were racist, self interested, and narrow minded Rather than take sides, Daws seems interested in helping the reader understand that the annexation and Americanization of Hawaii was not as black and white as people today like to think He does a good job exploring the complex and long lasting relationship between Hawaiians and Europeans and explaining how the intersection of multiple political motivations resulted in statehood Regardless of how you feel about Hawaii s history, this book is a good read Daws paints the picture of a thriving, impressive culture that is perhaps prematurely thrust on to the Western political stage and forced to adapt Both good and bad come of it, and I think any student interested in Hawaiian history should read this book if only to understand that the path to take was not always obvious, and that the characters involved were not inherently good or inherently bad


  6. Terry Brooks Terry Brooks says:

    Shoal is the history of the Kings of Hawaii from Kamehameha 1 to the end of the monarchy in the late 1900s The story is true, but the events are incredible and compelling How the Hawaiian Islands were discovered and eventually subverted by the US and the European powers makes for great storytelling.


  7. Tarah Tarah says:

    well it s thorough The main issue here and other good readers have raised this is that the author is extremely and unmistakably on the side of empire Like, almost comically so It s like if you watched Star Wars but it was told from the perspective of Darth Vader explaining how the Empire is just trying to bring order to things, really, and sure it doesn t go well for the locals all the times, but in the end it really was for ordered good, and their local customs religion traditions we well it s thorough The main issue here and other good readers have raised this is that the author is extremely and unmistakably on the side of empire Like, almost comically so It s like if you watched Star Wars but it was told from the perspective of Darth Vader explaining how the Empire is just trying to bring order to things, really, and sure it doesn t go well for the locals all the times, but in the end it really was for ordered good, and their local customs religion traditions were backwards before we got there and sorted it out, etc I mean, I d watch that movie, but it sure does have a certain angle.Take his description of what is widely and commonly called by historians, Hawaiians, laypeople like everyone the Bayonet Constitution because King Kalakaua was forced to sign it basically under gunpoint Not only does he not mention the bayonet constitution and really underplay the forced nature of the event, but the entire episode is under the chapter entitled bulwarks of Liberty referencing the white folks who sought and forced the new constitution soooo that gives you a sense of who s side we re on there In describing one of the many takeover s of the Native government essentially by white pineapple and sugar barons, he says So good government triumphed and calls them the well intentioned revolutionaries I actually snorted out loud.The chapters on the union activity on the plantation read like union busting brochures And in describing the anti communist, McCarthy era anti American commission activities in Hawaii during which loads of people were arrested and imprisoned for being suspected communists with little to no evidence , it reads a bit like well, you know, communism was scary, so there you have it Additionally, phrasing like the Orientals can be extremely jarring though maybe when it was originally published that was seen as acceptable language but, like, errrrr was it All in all it is thorough, but the author has a very obvious bias, so is it thorough What info has been excluded Whose stories are not being told Whose voices aren t represented I have a guess


  8. Cora Cora says:

    it took me ages to finish this, but at least i didn t take a whole year yikes I am truly amazed this book even exists to be honest and I m sure the copies of it are rare, so it s evenincredible I had the chance to read it at all The writing is deeply moving for me, a perfect blend of humor and striking truth that exposes the beauty and brutality of Hawaiian history in a way I would never have expected.It s a shame it was published in 1974, since I d love to knowcontemporary hist it took me ages to finish this, but at least i didn t take a whole year yikes I am truly amazed this book even exists to be honest and I m sure the copies of it are rare, so it s evenincredible I had the chance to read it at all The writing is deeply moving for me, a perfect blend of humor and striking truth that exposes the beauty and brutality of Hawaiian history in a way I would never have expected.It s a shame it was published in 1974, since I d love to knowcontemporary history as well. but the amount of research for the time span is phenomenal so much detail is put into this history that at any moment you feel completely at home in the narrative, as if it was just a carefully crafted plot instead of real events.also reading it in hawaii was eveninteresting since it made me so muchaware of the impact of Hawaiian history on the land today ex the names of places like Dillingham Airfield or seeing the impact of big industries


  9. Kara Kara says:

    This might be the original comprehensive history of Hawaii, but boy is it a dull and tedious read I did appreciate how much ground Daws tries to cover, as many other Hawaiian histories focus on the short lived monarchy and the period of annexation, whereas he covers the pre Captain Cook era through the granting of statehood post WWII However, his monotonous litany of facts, unbroken by nary an interesting anecdote, made it difficult to absorb the information or concentrate on the text for lo This might be the original comprehensive history of Hawaii, but boy is it a dull and tedious read I did appreciate how much ground Daws tries to cover, as many other Hawaiian histories focus on the short lived monarchy and the period of annexation, whereas he covers the pre Captain Cook era through the granting of statehood post WWII However, his monotonous litany of facts, unbroken by nary an interesting anecdote, made it difficult to absorb the information or concentrate on the text for long periods of time I also found Daws skimming of certain historical periods a strange decision Liliuokalani is only given a bit part, for example Perhaps his treatment of Liliuokalani is symptomatic of his necessarily limited perspective as a white male writer indeed, I found Daws treatment of non white and or female historical figures problematic, as many of them are presented as caricatures, or in the case of the women hardly acknowledged at all If you re trying to see how scholars have documented Hawaiian history differently through the ages, your sort of have to read this book But if you re just a regular reader looking to knowabout the history of Hawaii, I m sure you can find a less biased andentertaining modern read


  10. David Bjelland David Bjelland says:

    Considering that I was born there, my mom s side of the family has lived there for multiple generations, and I have a Hawaiian middle name, I can t help but feel shamefully overdue in finally seeking out a substantial history of the place, and this book happened to present itself the last time I was back at my parent s house and browsing around for something to read it was a gift to my Mom from her librarian at Punahou, when the book was still fairly new It s one thing not to be curious for s Considering that I was born there, my mom s side of the family has lived there for multiple generations, and I have a Hawaiian middle name, I can t help but feel shamefully overdue in finally seeking out a substantial history of the place, and this book happened to present itself the last time I was back at my parent s house and browsing around for something to read it was a gift to my Mom from her librarian at Punahou, when the book was still fairly new It s one thing not to be curious for so long about a place whose history is inseparable from that of your own family, but thenagging motivation for eventually hunting something like this down might honestly be plain old white guilt the knowledge that my recent ancestors were complicit in the gradual, mundane domination of the native Hawaiians, sitting uneasily in the back of my mind since the onset of Political Awareness Puberty It seems appropriate and necessary that at some point I should figure out what that process really looked like, but alas, Shoal of Time is no People s History of Hawaii, for better or worse Daws possesses what s normally considered an admirable sense of personal removal from his topic, and while I wouldn t necessarily call him an apologist for imperialism in the Hawaiian Islands, he does treat some of the graver injustices with an analytical, fatalistic tone that s hard to distinguish from tacit approval On the plus side gee whiz does this guy know how to hunt down documents If it seems like he has no personal opinions on certain characters or events, it s because he doesn t have to to fill up a dense, 400 pg book, relying instead on a stupifying body of diaries, letters, diplomatic cables, court proceedings, pamphlets, etc Or maybe that s where the bar for most historians is, and I just don t read enough of the broad, thorough, non pop stuff Will have to work on that Nonetheless, a unique and perceptive critical voice still sneaks in between the cracks of all the citations one that s content to poke at human folly without getting its feathers ruffled over it


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10 thoughts on “Shoal of Time: A History of the Hawaiian Islands

  1. Scot Scot says:

    This book is widely considered to be the definitive text when it comes to the modern history of Hawai i Certainly, no other text attempts to take on such a broad swathe of history in such detail If you re interested in the history of Hawai i and or the imperialist history of the U.S in the Pacific, Shoal of Time is a must read However, beware, I found that the book has some pretty big flaws.First of all, every historical account can only be told from the perspective of the historian who tell This book is widely considered to be the definitive text when it comes to the modern history of Hawai i Certainly, no other text attempts to take on such a broad swathe of history in such detail If you re interested in the history of Hawai i and or the imperialist history of the U.S in the Pacific, Shoal of Time is a must read However, beware, I found that the book has some pretty big flaws.First of all, every historical account can only be told from the perspective of the historian who tells it, and this historian is definitely one who has an all s well that ends well point of view about the colonization of Hawai i and all that was lost in the process In addition there are some historical inaccuracies and exclusions that make a real difference to one s understanding of just what, exactly, happened here.On the second point, Daws gives short shrift to what many refer to as the Great Dying, the historical sweep of 80 or so years during whichthan 95% of the Hawaiian people died, due largely to contracting diseases brought to Hawai i by it s colonizers and to which Hawaiians had no immunity This catastrophe could not but have shaped the worldview of the Hawaiian people, including our relationship to our religion and religious leaders, opening the doors to many significant changes that are presented as though they were easily chosen by Hawaiians For instance, when everyone around you is dying, you might think your gods were failing you, making the notion of trying on a new god or two kind of appealing, especially when the missionaries bringing you the word of said god are taking advantage of the situation and suggesting that you are all dying of sin.Also on this point, Daws at one juncture suggests that plantation life in Hawai i was similar to that of the antebellum southeastern U.S but for, though not in so many words, the slavery and threats to white women by black men causing unrest and acts of retaliation like lynchings I accept that slavery is different than peonage, which isalong the lines of what immigrant workers experienced in Hawai i, but the notion that lynchings in the south were acts of retaliation is just b.s The whole notion of the sexually depraved black man is a myth created by white men in the south in order to justify acts of violence that were really committed in order to intimidate slaves and prevent them from rebelling not to mention subsequent generations of African Americans in order to quell challenges to white supremacy I d call that a pretty big gaff, and one that reveals a lot about the Daws point of view on issues of race That point of view comes across now and then throughout, though I believe unintentionally But, again, all in all, no other book goes as far, nor into as much detail, at least where English language resources are concerned, as this one For a history of Hawai i that delves into Hawaiian language resources which tell a very different story, check out Aloha Betrayed by Noenoe Silva in my books

  2. Dan Dan says:

    4.5 star review.If you want to gain insight into the extraordinary human diversity of Hawaii, this is a fantastic read This one volume history, now 40 years old, covers Hawaii from Captain Cook s arrival to Barack Obama s birth I found the book to be highly informative and very well written Because it covers so much, the stories are at best vignettes but there are so many nationalities represented in Hawaii s history that it is absorbing The middle to latter portions of the book are well doc 4.5 star review.If you want to gain insight into the extraordinary human diversity of Hawaii, this is a fantastic read This one volume history, now 40 years old, covers Hawaii from Captain Cook s arrival to Barack Obama s birth I found the book to be highly informative and very well written Because it covers so much, the stories are at best vignettes but there are so many nationalities represented in Hawaii s history that it is absorbing The middle to latter portions of the book are well documented, the earlier portions are thinly referenced but that is to be expected If you want to understand the role that the missionaries played or if you want to know what a horrible person Sanford Dole was, this book tells some relatable stories While the book is not written from a native Hawaiian perspective it harbors a good deal of disdain for the white American imperialists, justifiably I might add Otherwise 5 stars, but a little dated

  3. Bruce Bruce says:

    Shoal of Time is an ok introduction to Hawaiian history, thorough in some areas, but glaringly thin and or dated in others Only recommended for background reading as part of a broader palette of histories, texts and cultural texts offering differing viewpoints.Other books and historical texts that I recommend for acomplete cultural and historical view include The Voices of Eden All Volumes of The Hawaiian Journal of History Hawaiian Historical Society For Whom the Stars Must We Shoal of Time is an ok introduction to Hawaiian history, thorough in some areas, but glaringly thin and or dated in others Only recommended for background reading as part of a broader palette of histories, texts and cultural texts offering differing viewpoints.Other books and historical texts that I recommend for acomplete cultural and historical view include The Voices of Eden All Volumes of The Hawaiian Journal of History Hawaiian Historical Society For Whom the Stars Must We Wait in Dispair Anything written by Mary Kawena Pukui but particularly including The Hawaiian Dictionary The Polynesian Family System in Ka u Place Names of Hawaii Handy, Handy and Pukui s Native Planters in Old Hawaii The Fornander collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folklore , Volumes IV, V and VIAnything written by Samual Kamakau but particularly Ruling Chiefs of Hawai i Anything written by Patrick Vinton Kirch but particularly On the Road of the Winds A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawai i The Evolution of Polynesian Chiefdoms Unwritten Literature of Hawaii Hawaii s Forgotten History Voyage of Rediscovery An Ocean in Mind We the Navigators N Inoa H k Presstime in Hawaii Bishop Museum BulletinsI m missing a ton of other titles and authors that should be on this list including several covering the plantation era, post world war II and Hawaiian renaissance but the above is not a bad start

  4. Jeffrey Jeffrey says:

    Hands down the best one volume political history of modern Hawaii ever written It s difficult to write a history of the islands since Captain Cook s arrival through US annexation and statehood without taking sides in the struggle between the natives and haoles and the book s point of view definitely does have its clear heroes and villains but Daws makes an honest effort to provide context for all the warring factions in the book and avoids turning it into a one sided screed as it could ha Hands down the best one volume political history of modern Hawaii ever written It s difficult to write a history of the islands since Captain Cook s arrival through US annexation and statehood without taking sides in the struggle between the natives and haoles and the book s point of view definitely does have its clear heroes and villains but Daws makes an honest effort to provide context for all the warring factions in the book and avoids turning it into a one sided screed as it could have been Two warnings to prospective readers One this is a political history, not a cultural one, so don t read it to learn about native customs and traditions Second the paperback edition has no pictures, maps or illustrations and this is a book that would deeply benefit from having them.These caveats aside, the book is highly recommended to anyone with an interest in the history of Hawaii from 1778 to statehood in 1959

  5. James James says:

    After living in Hawaii for 4 years, I got sick of not being able to answer questions from friends and family about the history of the islands I was looking for a readable book that would take me from Captain Cook to statehood, which is exactly what Daws has written.When I was looking for books, a found a few reviews of this volume that said it was biased against Native Hawaiians, so I was cautious when I started reading After getting through a few chapters, I realized that the problem is not t After living in Hawaii for 4 years, I got sick of not being able to answer questions from friends and family about the history of the islands I was looking for a readable book that would take me from Captain Cook to statehood, which is exactly what Daws has written.When I was looking for books, a found a few reviews of this volume that said it was biased against Native Hawaiians, so I was cautious when I started reading After getting through a few chapters, I realized that the problem is not that Daws is unfair to Native Hawaiians, but that he is brutally honest about all parties involved in Hawaii s complex history For every time he points out a poor political decision made by the Hawaiian monarchy, he also makes sure to note that many of the white business men were racist, self interested, and narrow minded Rather than take sides, Daws seems interested in helping the reader understand that the annexation and Americanization of Hawaii was not as black and white as people today like to think He does a good job exploring the complex and long lasting relationship between Hawaiians and Europeans and explaining how the intersection of multiple political motivations resulted in statehood Regardless of how you feel about Hawaii s history, this book is a good read Daws paints the picture of a thriving, impressive culture that is perhaps prematurely thrust on to the Western political stage and forced to adapt Both good and bad come of it, and I think any student interested in Hawaiian history should read this book if only to understand that the path to take was not always obvious, and that the characters involved were not inherently good or inherently bad

  6. Terry Brooks Terry Brooks says:

    Shoal is the history of the Kings of Hawaii from Kamehameha 1 to the end of the monarchy in the late 1900s The story is true, but the events are incredible and compelling How the Hawaiian Islands were discovered and eventually subverted by the US and the European powers makes for great storytelling.

  7. Tarah Tarah says:

    well it s thorough The main issue here and other good readers have raised this is that the author is extremely and unmistakably on the side of empire Like, almost comically so It s like if you watched Star Wars but it was told from the perspective of Darth Vader explaining how the Empire is just trying to bring order to things, really, and sure it doesn t go well for the locals all the times, but in the end it really was for ordered good, and their local customs religion traditions we well it s thorough The main issue here and other good readers have raised this is that the author is extremely and unmistakably on the side of empire Like, almost comically so It s like if you watched Star Wars but it was told from the perspective of Darth Vader explaining how the Empire is just trying to bring order to things, really, and sure it doesn t go well for the locals all the times, but in the end it really was for ordered good, and their local customs religion traditions were backwards before we got there and sorted it out, etc I mean, I d watch that movie, but it sure does have a certain angle.Take his description of what is widely and commonly called by historians, Hawaiians, laypeople like everyone the Bayonet Constitution because King Kalakaua was forced to sign it basically under gunpoint Not only does he not mention the bayonet constitution and really underplay the forced nature of the event, but the entire episode is under the chapter entitled bulwarks of Liberty referencing the white folks who sought and forced the new constitution soooo that gives you a sense of who s side we re on there In describing one of the many takeover s of the Native government essentially by white pineapple and sugar barons, he says So good government triumphed and calls them the well intentioned revolutionaries I actually snorted out loud.The chapters on the union activity on the plantation read like union busting brochures And in describing the anti communist, McCarthy era anti American commission activities in Hawaii during which loads of people were arrested and imprisoned for being suspected communists with little to no evidence , it reads a bit like well, you know, communism was scary, so there you have it Additionally, phrasing like the Orientals can be extremely jarring though maybe when it was originally published that was seen as acceptable language but, like, errrrr was it All in all it is thorough, but the author has a very obvious bias, so is it thorough What info has been excluded Whose stories are not being told Whose voices aren t represented I have a guess

  8. Cora Cora says:

    it took me ages to finish this, but at least i didn t take a whole year yikes I am truly amazed this book even exists to be honest and I m sure the copies of it are rare, so it s evenincredible I had the chance to read it at all The writing is deeply moving for me, a perfect blend of humor and striking truth that exposes the beauty and brutality of Hawaiian history in a way I would never have expected.It s a shame it was published in 1974, since I d love to knowcontemporary hist it took me ages to finish this, but at least i didn t take a whole year yikes I am truly amazed this book even exists to be honest and I m sure the copies of it are rare, so it s evenincredible I had the chance to read it at all The writing is deeply moving for me, a perfect blend of humor and striking truth that exposes the beauty and brutality of Hawaiian history in a way I would never have expected.It s a shame it was published in 1974, since I d love to knowcontemporary history as well. but the amount of research for the time span is phenomenal so much detail is put into this history that at any moment you feel completely at home in the narrative, as if it was just a carefully crafted plot instead of real events.also reading it in hawaii was eveninteresting since it made me so muchaware of the impact of Hawaiian history on the land today ex the names of places like Dillingham Airfield or seeing the impact of big industries

  9. Kara Kara says:

    This might be the original comprehensive history of Hawaii, but boy is it a dull and tedious read I did appreciate how much ground Daws tries to cover, as many other Hawaiian histories focus on the short lived monarchy and the period of annexation, whereas he covers the pre Captain Cook era through the granting of statehood post WWII However, his monotonous litany of facts, unbroken by nary an interesting anecdote, made it difficult to absorb the information or concentrate on the text for lo This might be the original comprehensive history of Hawaii, but boy is it a dull and tedious read I did appreciate how much ground Daws tries to cover, as many other Hawaiian histories focus on the short lived monarchy and the period of annexation, whereas he covers the pre Captain Cook era through the granting of statehood post WWII However, his monotonous litany of facts, unbroken by nary an interesting anecdote, made it difficult to absorb the information or concentrate on the text for long periods of time I also found Daws skimming of certain historical periods a strange decision Liliuokalani is only given a bit part, for example Perhaps his treatment of Liliuokalani is symptomatic of his necessarily limited perspective as a white male writer indeed, I found Daws treatment of non white and or female historical figures problematic, as many of them are presented as caricatures, or in the case of the women hardly acknowledged at all If you re trying to see how scholars have documented Hawaiian history differently through the ages, your sort of have to read this book But if you re just a regular reader looking to knowabout the history of Hawaii, I m sure you can find a less biased andentertaining modern read

  10. David Bjelland David Bjelland says:

    Considering that I was born there, my mom s side of the family has lived there for multiple generations, and I have a Hawaiian middle name, I can t help but feel shamefully overdue in finally seeking out a substantial history of the place, and this book happened to present itself the last time I was back at my parent s house and browsing around for something to read it was a gift to my Mom from her librarian at Punahou, when the book was still fairly new It s one thing not to be curious for s Considering that I was born there, my mom s side of the family has lived there for multiple generations, and I have a Hawaiian middle name, I can t help but feel shamefully overdue in finally seeking out a substantial history of the place, and this book happened to present itself the last time I was back at my parent s house and browsing around for something to read it was a gift to my Mom from her librarian at Punahou, when the book was still fairly new It s one thing not to be curious for so long about a place whose history is inseparable from that of your own family, but thenagging motivation for eventually hunting something like this down might honestly be plain old white guilt the knowledge that my recent ancestors were complicit in the gradual, mundane domination of the native Hawaiians, sitting uneasily in the back of my mind since the onset of Political Awareness Puberty It seems appropriate and necessary that at some point I should figure out what that process really looked like, but alas, Shoal of Time is no People s History of Hawaii, for better or worse Daws possesses what s normally considered an admirable sense of personal removal from his topic, and while I wouldn t necessarily call him an apologist for imperialism in the Hawaiian Islands, he does treat some of the graver injustices with an analytical, fatalistic tone that s hard to distinguish from tacit approval On the plus side gee whiz does this guy know how to hunt down documents If it seems like he has no personal opinions on certain characters or events, it s because he doesn t have to to fill up a dense, 400 pg book, relying instead on a stupifying body of diaries, letters, diplomatic cables, court proceedings, pamphlets, etc Or maybe that s where the bar for most historians is, and I just don t read enough of the broad, thorough, non pop stuff Will have to work on that Nonetheless, a unique and perceptive critical voice still sneaks in between the cracks of all the citations one that s content to poke at human folly without getting its feathers ruffled over it

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