The Forgiven PDF/EPUB Þ Hardcover

The Forgiven PDF/EPUB Þ Hardcover

The Forgiven [Reading] ➸ The Forgiven By Lawrence Osborne – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk In this stylish, haunting novel, journalist and novelist Lawrence Osborne explores the reverberations of a random accident on the lives of Moroccan Muslims and Western visitors who converge on a luxur In this stylish, haunting novel, journalist and novelist Lawrence Osborne explores the reverberations of a random accident on the lives of Moroccan Muslims and Western visitors who converge on a luxurious desert villa for a decadent weekend long party David and Jo Henniger, a doctor and children s book author, in search of an escape from their less than happy lives in London, accept the invitation of their old friends Richard and Dally to attend their annual bacchanal at their home deep in the Moroccan desert a ksar they have acquired and renovated into a luxurious retreat On the way, the Hennigers stop for lunch, and the bad tempered David can t resist consuming most of a bottle of wine Back on the road, darkness has descended, David is groggy, and the directions to the ksar are vague Suddenly, two young men spring from the roadside, apparently attempting to interest passing drivers in the fossils they have for sale Panicked, David swerves toward the two, leaving one dead on the road and the other running into the hills At the ksar, the festivities have begun Richard and Dally s international friends sit down to a lavish dinner prepared and served by a large staff of Moroccans As the night progresses and the debauchery escalates, the Moroccans increasingly view the revelers as the godless infidels they are When David and Jo show up late with the dead body of the young man in their car, word spreads among the locals that David has committed an unforgivable act Thus the stage is set for a weekend during which David and Jo must come to terms with David s misdeed, Jo s longings, and their own deteriorating relationship, and the flamboyant Richard and Dally must attempt to keep their revelers entertained despite growing tension from their staff and the Moroccan Berber father who comes to claim his son s body With spare, evocative prose, searing eroticism, and a gift for the unexpected, Osborne memorably portrays the privileged guests wrestling with their secrets amidst the remoteness and beauty of the desert landscape He also gradually reveals the jolting back story of the young man who was killed and leaves David s fate in the balance as the novel builds to a shattering conclusion.


10 thoughts on “The Forgiven

  1. Agnieszka Agnieszka says:

    life is but a sport and a pastime, as the Koran carefully reminds us, and because it is a game and nothing , one forgets that the point of life is death .David and Jo, a bit bored with life and themselves marriage, accept an invitation to attend an annual fiesta in the middle of Moroccan desert Their hosts are well to do gay couple Richard and Dally and party in their residence reminds rather insatiable orgy than tea on the Sahara On their way to desert estate married couple is quarrelilife is but a sport and a pastime, as the Koran carefully reminds us, and because it is a game and nothing , one forgets that the point of life is death .David and Jo, a bit bored with life and themselves marriage, accept an invitation to attend an annual fiesta in the middle of Moroccan desert Their hosts are well to do gay couple Richard and Dally and party in their residence reminds rather insatiable orgy than tea on the Sahara On their way to desert estate married couple is quarreling and David drinks too much, besides it s getting dark and so we have cut and dried recipe for a disaster David hits young man ostensibly selling fossils on the roadside and not knowing what to do brings the body with himself to the party And the whole further story revolves around issue of guilt and redemption, responsibility and forgiveness Though problem of blame and innocence is not that obvious.This novel is dark and disturbing I can sense here influence of Paul Bowles and Graham Greene, both in writing style and the subject The same carefree belief that nothing can happen to us, the same false sense of security and the same arrogance and patronizing attitude in relation to the natives ThoughThe Forgivenis to the core contemporary novel nevertheless its background reflects concerns of colonialism era While Moroccan servants, like a Greek chorus in ancient tragedy, are silently watching the corrupt Westerners, the latter behave and act as if they owned that place and werethere at home than poor Berber tribes They drink and take drugs with abandon, indulge themselves in lechery ignoring necessity to demonstrate though a bit respect to local customs and tradition.This novel deals on many levels On the macro scale it s showing clash between West and East, rich and poor, Christians and Muslims It dispels the myth of cultural coexistence and shows disparaging attitude of people of the West towards the Arab world At the micro level is an analysis of human ties but also decline of relationship David and Jo marriage is failing and it would be foolish to expect that a few days of debauchery and drunkenness could bridge the gap between them and bring back the bygone closeness It s like to believe that a bit of air freshener is able to offset the smell of mold and rot in musty room Or like the trip to some exotic place could bring back lost intimacy and cement anew broken relationship Now and then it succeeds butThe Forgivenmercilessly shows that the net result may be evendevastating


  2. Brian Brian says:

    Beautifully written, shattering prose that makes Western in sensibilities crumble in the harsh desert sun of northern Africa I want to pen so muchabout why this novel is superlatively fantabulous, but I ll unwittingly spoil things without Spoiler tags The only future worth entertaining is the one we can t imagine at all. Forgive me, please, and read this wondrous novel about how we all go about un Forgiven.


  3. Trish Trish says:

    Tension squeezes the heart from the moment the book opens A man and a woman, married, arrive in Tangier from Europe on a ferry They are tired, and it is hot The couple is meant to be driving deep into the desert to participate in an annual feast put on by another European couple The wife had thought she might want to stay until the next day, but the husband insists on going that night The city is dirty, hot, disorienting They rent a car and begin the drive but they are tired, and the crank Tension squeezes the heart from the moment the book opens A man and a woman, married, arrive in Tangier from Europe on a ferry They are tired, and it is hot The couple is meant to be driving deep into the desert to participate in an annual feast put on by another European couple The wife had thought she might want to stay until the next day, but the husband insists on going that night The city is dirty, hot, disorienting They rent a car and begin the drive but they are tired, and the crankiness they exhibit with one another has muchto do with their life in England than the temporary discomfort and stress of their vacation.We are told by the cover copy that there is a shattering conclusion to this novel, and my stomach was roiling from the first pages I found myself avoiding the reading of this story Everything said, described, or implied made me anxious When I got to the part where the couple, driving later than they d planned and after dark, hit an Arab man with their car, I was ready to give up The couple completed the journey to the party in the desert at the house of their friend with a dead Arab in their car Then I did give up I am not giving anything away This all happens at the beginning of the novel and is the set up, basically My nerves couldn t take it If someone showed up at a party with a dead person in their car, I think I might not enjoy that event any further Call me a wimp Those who get to the end, who can take a fiction as fiction, I give them all kinds of credit for nerves of steel


  4. Jeanette (Again) Jeanette (Again) says:

    What drew me to this book was the setting It takes place in an unglamorous part of Morocco that many tourists would never see Lawrence Osbourne has lived the expat life in Morocco, and he seems to grasp the mindset of the Moroccan Berber people and how they view the ridiculous excesses of wealthy foreigners who come to their country Osbourne also shows an understanding of the economic dilemma facing the poorest Moroccans who must rely on tourists for their livelihood Many of them go to Franc What drew me to this book was the setting It takes place in an unglamorous part of Morocco that many tourists would never see Lawrence Osbourne has lived the expat life in Morocco, and he seems to grasp the mindset of the Moroccan Berber people and how they view the ridiculous excesses of wealthy foreigners who come to their country Osbourne also shows an understanding of the economic dilemma facing the poorest Moroccans who must rely on tourists for their livelihood Many of them go to France hoping for a better life, but it s difficult to find jobs without skills, and the cost of living sends them packing back home to Morocco.The pivotal event in the story is an accident that kills a Berber boy selling fossils by the side of the road The driver who hits him, David Heniger, is an English doctor who is impossible to like He sconcerned with covering his tracks and not being inconvenienced than he is with atoning for the death he has caused while driving under the influence of alcohol.What I foundinteresting than David s ordeal was the three day bacchanal taking place at the home of David s friends, Richard and Dally Here is where we see the contrast in cultures The guests are all wealthy Europeans and Americans, there to indulge in an almost orgiastic fashion The native people who are hired to serve and clean up after the visitors must be subservient, because they desperately need the money But, as devout Muslims, they are offended and puzzled by the behaviors they witness The otherness as perceived from both sides makes it clear why East and West are always at odds 3.5 stars


  5. Nic Penrake Nic Penrake says:

    In a word, outstanding Best novel I ve read in a long time The prose is utterly seductive Within a few pages I was straight back in Morocco, which I only know from one visit, but there I was, seeing and smelling it all so vividly I love the blend of impartiability and compassion, the despair and dogged hope, the quiet English irony of the travelled writer Although he s English, he osborne hasin common for me with American writers like McInerney very sensuous, never fidgety the way s In a word, outstanding Best novel I ve read in a long time The prose is utterly seductive Within a few pages I was straight back in Morocco, which I only know from one visit, but there I was, seeing and smelling it all so vividly I love the blend of impartiability and compassion, the despair and dogged hope, the quiet English irony of the travelled writer Although he s English, he osborne hasin common for me with American writers like McInerney very sensuous, never fidgety the way so many English writers are I can t recommend it highly enough In fact I ve embarked on the rest of his writing Just finished Bangkok Days, easily the ebst travel book I ve ever read and am now on another non fiction book of his, The Accidental Connoiseur


  6. Lisa B. Lisa B. says:

    My ThoughtsThis was very good Not fast paced, but a slow simmering suspense I m going to share one extra tidbit to make this evenenticing The father of the young man that David struck and killed shows up at the ksar He wants David, and ONLY David to come back to their village to attend his son s burial and as such, atone for what he did.Oh really A bereaved Muslim father wants an unbeliever, an infidel, to come alone to their distant village What happens to David And in David s abse My ThoughtsThis was very good Not fast paced, but a slow simmering suspense I m going to share one extra tidbit to make this evenenticing The father of the young man that David struck and killed shows up at the ksar He wants David, and ONLY David to come back to their village to attend his son s burial and as such, atone for what he did.Oh really A bereaved Muslim father wants an unbeliever, an infidel, to come alone to their distant village What happens to David And in David s absence, what s his wife up to The Muslim servants at the party find out very early about the accident This, along with the hedonistic activities that are taking place, also creates an undercurrent of tension Does anyone come out of this unscathed Well written Heart Pounding Descriptive Sizzling.Bravo Mr Osborne.Thank you Crown Publishing and Netgalley for allowing me to read this in exchange for an unbiased review.Publish date September 25, 2012


  7. Cheryl Cheryl says:

    one forgets that the point of life is death The story seemingly describes a culture clash, between traditional Moroccan Muslims trying to scratch out a living and affluent Westerners who have too much of a living But it could equally have been set in a vast country estate of the wealthy in 19th century Britain, pitting the lords against the peasants.Or in the crowded streets of New York.I just realized what this story has in common with The Bonfire of the Vanities a car driven by a rich p one forgets that the point of life is death The story seemingly describes a culture clash, between traditional Moroccan Muslims trying to scratch out a living and affluent Westerners who have too much of a living But it could equally have been set in a vast country estate of the wealthy in 19th century Britain, pitting the lords against the peasants.Or in the crowded streets of New York.I just realized what this story has in common with The Bonfire of the Vanities a car driven by a rich person hits a poor person of a different race in a different country the Bronx was like a different country to Sherman McCoy The plot lines diverge, but we are provoked in to considering the moralities at play.Who is to be forgiven In this case, most obviously forgive the driver that killed the man But by the end of the book I am asking who, or who else Should it be the boy whose perceived criminal intent put into motion the series of events that culminated in his own death And because of this, he deprives his own father of his only son Should it be view spoiler the father who harbors uncertain murderous intent Should it be the young man who ultimately carries out the intention of his dead friend hide spoiler Should it be everyone, because everyone has done, will do, wrong that is what it is to be human But maybe it is referring to the sense of entitlement of the perpetual colonialists, the expats, who seem to feel as if nothing is their fault, as if everything they ve done wrong should be forgiven because they wouldn t have done it if events or actions by others had not impelled them The adult manifestation of the child s plaintive cry, But he made me do it It s not fair I wouldn t have done this if he hadn t done that Their relative wealth confers great power over the natives The powerful are forgiven the subjugated are punished What is the distance between revenge and forgiveness


  8. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    I chose to read this book based on the books synopsis on Goodreads It sounded alluring What I found this book to be was the Great Gatsby set in Morrocco Full of superficial wealthy characters who spend there days worrying about what they will eat next and what parties they will go smoke weed at or get drunk at next I also felt the author gave way too much detail on insigniciant parts of the story I cant say that he doesn t pay attention to detail, it was overkill though Political commentar I chose to read this book based on the books synopsis on Goodreads It sounded alluring What I found this book to be was the Great Gatsby set in Morrocco Full of superficial wealthy characters who spend there days worrying about what they will eat next and what parties they will go smoke weed at or get drunk at next I also felt the author gave way too much detail on insigniciant parts of the story I cant say that he doesn t pay attention to detail, it was overkill though Political commentary on Muslims, Americans, Iraq, etc I think he had to make to storyline fit the title and it wasn t really smooth I am sure glad this was a free download from my library


  9. Jason Pettus Jason Pettus says:

    Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography cclapcenter.com I am the original author of this review, as well as the owner of CCLaP it is not being reprinted illegally Now that I m finished with it, I find myself having a hard time deciding what exactly to think of critical darling and professional nomad Lawrence Osborne s latest novel, the engaging but also meandering The Forgiven Because on the one hand, its Graham Greene meets the Tea Party setting is going to be Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography cclapcenter.com I am the original author of this review, as well as the owner of CCLaP it is not being reprinted illegally Now that I m finished with it, I find myself having a hard time deciding what exactly to think of critical darling and professional nomad Lawrence Osborne s latest novel, the engaging but also meandering The Forgiven Because on the one hand, its Graham Greene meets the Tea Party setting is going to be fascinating to most sheltered Westerners like myself almost the entire story takes place within a former Moroccan village that an upper class gay British couple have bought in its entirety and turned into a private sybaritic estate, where the former family hovels have been turned into WiFi equipped guest bungalows, and once a year a week long orgy of drugs and group sex is thrown for the spoiled globetrotters who fly in specifically for it, so notorious that it regularly makes the society pages back in the UK and US publications where most of the guests are from And the plot that this veteran journalist and academic favorite places within this setting is fascinating as well two of the guests, a bickering middle aged British couple, decide to drive to the compound from the airport themselves, accidentally hitting and killing a local African teen in the middle of the night while the driver is slightly sauced, which serves as the catalyst for both a blow up and deconstruction of their crumbling marriage, the husband s growing alcoholism, the wife s infidelity, the hosts tongue in cheek imperialist lifestyle, and even such local issues as scared bravado masked as fiery political rhetoric, and pride versus familial duties But on the other hand, it takes an awfully big suspension of disbelief to buy into the main plot turn that fuels the entire second half of the book that the drunken spoiled vehicular manslaughterer in question would voluntarily ride into the desert with the father of the slain teen and his knife wielding buddies, for a weekend of penance and possible extortion to atone for the accident with the entire book sort of falling apart if you don t buy into this unlikely turn of events plus there s the fact that, while Osborne provides satisfyingly complex looks at his white characters, he often falls back on lazy cliches for the local Moroccans, and of course the age old argument among academic character heavy novels that not a whole lot actually happens once this wonderfully complex milieu is established, although by definition this will bother some people a lot less than others So when all is said and done, in general I recommend the book but with some caveats, that you need to be ready for a slower paced story whose main joy is merely in lazily lounging among the characters in question, and not in finding out what happens next If you re able to do this, you ll find in The Forgiven a beautifully written, thought provoking examination of 21st century imperialism, and the debate over whether this attitude is simply baked into all Westerners from childhood by default or if it s a specific result of the same sociopathic urge that drives the One Percenters to become those people in the first place.Out of 10 8.8


  10. Tuck Tuck says:

    if you know osbonrne s writings The Accidental Connoisseur An Irreverent Journey Through the Wine World you ll know, and expect, full on sensuality and food wine porn of the most yummy sort, and this novel brings you all that, plus too, evocation of place that is both factual seeming and seductive, even when it is 120 degrees in the shade and flies are biting so, Morocco, 21st century, a 1%er s posh re vamped and air conditioned hill top fort, fossil sellers out the ass, local boys as the if you know osbonrne s writings The Accidental Connoisseur An Irreverent Journey Through the Wine World you ll know, and expect, full on sensuality and food wine porn of the most yummy sort, and this novel brings you all that, plus too, evocation of place that is both factual seeming and seductive, even when it is 120 degrees in the shade and flies are biting so, Morocco, 21st century, a 1%er s posh re vamped and air conditioned hill top fort, fossil sellers out the ass, local boys as the servants, even a damn sir or lord or whatever helicoptering in from uk then of course the piggy euros accidentally kill a hard working, innocent young hard working muslim hillbilly out in the middle of the desert in the middle of the night on a lonely empty highway, in a dust storm, of course tongue out of cheek now and now we havethan just a clash of west v east modern v tradish muslim v chistian v hedon but also death, sadness, unfairness, face, restitution, justice, imperialism, etc etc. so on that thin as sand plot and some harsh juxtapositions the reader is plunged into the bowles family back scene with lots of garcia lorca imaging and d h lawrence clean clean dirtiness so read it for the beauty of date palms swishing, and russian women swimming and sandwiches in the hamper all cool and crisp in the hot hot sun, and forget the thin thin sand and five villages of some damn hamada that is tibesti well, could be tibesti anyway, might as well be where one village is lousier than the other four yeah forget that part of the plot the trilobites are just there for atmosphere, that is if they are not the most important part of this lovely novel


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10 thoughts on “The Forgiven

  1. Agnieszka Agnieszka says:

    life is but a sport and a pastime, as the Koran carefully reminds us, and because it is a game and nothing , one forgets that the point of life is death .David and Jo, a bit bored with life and themselves marriage, accept an invitation to attend an annual fiesta in the middle of Moroccan desert Their hosts are well to do gay couple Richard and Dally and party in their residence reminds rather insatiable orgy than tea on the Sahara On their way to desert estate married couple is quarrelilife is but a sport and a pastime, as the Koran carefully reminds us, and because it is a game and nothing , one forgets that the point of life is death .David and Jo, a bit bored with life and themselves marriage, accept an invitation to attend an annual fiesta in the middle of Moroccan desert Their hosts are well to do gay couple Richard and Dally and party in their residence reminds rather insatiable orgy than tea on the Sahara On their way to desert estate married couple is quarreling and David drinks too much, besides it s getting dark and so we have cut and dried recipe for a disaster David hits young man ostensibly selling fossils on the roadside and not knowing what to do brings the body with himself to the party And the whole further story revolves around issue of guilt and redemption, responsibility and forgiveness Though problem of blame and innocence is not that obvious.This novel is dark and disturbing I can sense here influence of Paul Bowles and Graham Greene, both in writing style and the subject The same carefree belief that nothing can happen to us, the same false sense of security and the same arrogance and patronizing attitude in relation to the natives ThoughThe Forgivenis to the core contemporary novel nevertheless its background reflects concerns of colonialism era While Moroccan servants, like a Greek chorus in ancient tragedy, are silently watching the corrupt Westerners, the latter behave and act as if they owned that place and werethere at home than poor Berber tribes They drink and take drugs with abandon, indulge themselves in lechery ignoring necessity to demonstrate though a bit respect to local customs and tradition.This novel deals on many levels On the macro scale it s showing clash between West and East, rich and poor, Christians and Muslims It dispels the myth of cultural coexistence and shows disparaging attitude of people of the West towards the Arab world At the micro level is an analysis of human ties but also decline of relationship David and Jo marriage is failing and it would be foolish to expect that a few days of debauchery and drunkenness could bridge the gap between them and bring back the bygone closeness It s like to believe that a bit of air freshener is able to offset the smell of mold and rot in musty room Or like the trip to some exotic place could bring back lost intimacy and cement anew broken relationship Now and then it succeeds butThe Forgivenmercilessly shows that the net result may be evendevastating

  2. Brian Brian says:

    Beautifully written, shattering prose that makes Western in sensibilities crumble in the harsh desert sun of northern Africa I want to pen so muchabout why this novel is superlatively fantabulous, but I ll unwittingly spoil things without Spoiler tags The only future worth entertaining is the one we can t imagine at all. Forgive me, please, and read this wondrous novel about how we all go about un Forgiven.

  3. Trish Trish says:

    Tension squeezes the heart from the moment the book opens A man and a woman, married, arrive in Tangier from Europe on a ferry They are tired, and it is hot The couple is meant to be driving deep into the desert to participate in an annual feast put on by another European couple The wife had thought she might want to stay until the next day, but the husband insists on going that night The city is dirty, hot, disorienting They rent a car and begin the drive but they are tired, and the crank Tension squeezes the heart from the moment the book opens A man and a woman, married, arrive in Tangier from Europe on a ferry They are tired, and it is hot The couple is meant to be driving deep into the desert to participate in an annual feast put on by another European couple The wife had thought she might want to stay until the next day, but the husband insists on going that night The city is dirty, hot, disorienting They rent a car and begin the drive but they are tired, and the crankiness they exhibit with one another has muchto do with their life in England than the temporary discomfort and stress of their vacation.We are told by the cover copy that there is a shattering conclusion to this novel, and my stomach was roiling from the first pages I found myself avoiding the reading of this story Everything said, described, or implied made me anxious When I got to the part where the couple, driving later than they d planned and after dark, hit an Arab man with their car, I was ready to give up The couple completed the journey to the party in the desert at the house of their friend with a dead Arab in their car Then I did give up I am not giving anything away This all happens at the beginning of the novel and is the set up, basically My nerves couldn t take it If someone showed up at a party with a dead person in their car, I think I might not enjoy that event any further Call me a wimp Those who get to the end, who can take a fiction as fiction, I give them all kinds of credit for nerves of steel

  4. Jeanette (Again) Jeanette (Again) says:

    What drew me to this book was the setting It takes place in an unglamorous part of Morocco that many tourists would never see Lawrence Osbourne has lived the expat life in Morocco, and he seems to grasp the mindset of the Moroccan Berber people and how they view the ridiculous excesses of wealthy foreigners who come to their country Osbourne also shows an understanding of the economic dilemma facing the poorest Moroccans who must rely on tourists for their livelihood Many of them go to Franc What drew me to this book was the setting It takes place in an unglamorous part of Morocco that many tourists would never see Lawrence Osbourne has lived the expat life in Morocco, and he seems to grasp the mindset of the Moroccan Berber people and how they view the ridiculous excesses of wealthy foreigners who come to their country Osbourne also shows an understanding of the economic dilemma facing the poorest Moroccans who must rely on tourists for their livelihood Many of them go to France hoping for a better life, but it s difficult to find jobs without skills, and the cost of living sends them packing back home to Morocco.The pivotal event in the story is an accident that kills a Berber boy selling fossils by the side of the road The driver who hits him, David Heniger, is an English doctor who is impossible to like He sconcerned with covering his tracks and not being inconvenienced than he is with atoning for the death he has caused while driving under the influence of alcohol.What I foundinteresting than David s ordeal was the three day bacchanal taking place at the home of David s friends, Richard and Dally Here is where we see the contrast in cultures The guests are all wealthy Europeans and Americans, there to indulge in an almost orgiastic fashion The native people who are hired to serve and clean up after the visitors must be subservient, because they desperately need the money But, as devout Muslims, they are offended and puzzled by the behaviors they witness The otherness as perceived from both sides makes it clear why East and West are always at odds 3.5 stars

  5. Nic Penrake Nic Penrake says:

    In a word, outstanding Best novel I ve read in a long time The prose is utterly seductive Within a few pages I was straight back in Morocco, which I only know from one visit, but there I was, seeing and smelling it all so vividly I love the blend of impartiability and compassion, the despair and dogged hope, the quiet English irony of the travelled writer Although he s English, he osborne hasin common for me with American writers like McInerney very sensuous, never fidgety the way s In a word, outstanding Best novel I ve read in a long time The prose is utterly seductive Within a few pages I was straight back in Morocco, which I only know from one visit, but there I was, seeing and smelling it all so vividly I love the blend of impartiability and compassion, the despair and dogged hope, the quiet English irony of the travelled writer Although he s English, he osborne hasin common for me with American writers like McInerney very sensuous, never fidgety the way so many English writers are I can t recommend it highly enough In fact I ve embarked on the rest of his writing Just finished Bangkok Days, easily the ebst travel book I ve ever read and am now on another non fiction book of his, The Accidental Connoiseur

  6. Lisa B. Lisa B. says:

    My ThoughtsThis was very good Not fast paced, but a slow simmering suspense I m going to share one extra tidbit to make this evenenticing The father of the young man that David struck and killed shows up at the ksar He wants David, and ONLY David to come back to their village to attend his son s burial and as such, atone for what he did.Oh really A bereaved Muslim father wants an unbeliever, an infidel, to come alone to their distant village What happens to David And in David s abse My ThoughtsThis was very good Not fast paced, but a slow simmering suspense I m going to share one extra tidbit to make this evenenticing The father of the young man that David struck and killed shows up at the ksar He wants David, and ONLY David to come back to their village to attend his son s burial and as such, atone for what he did.Oh really A bereaved Muslim father wants an unbeliever, an infidel, to come alone to their distant village What happens to David And in David s absence, what s his wife up to The Muslim servants at the party find out very early about the accident This, along with the hedonistic activities that are taking place, also creates an undercurrent of tension Does anyone come out of this unscathed Well written Heart Pounding Descriptive Sizzling.Bravo Mr Osborne.Thank you Crown Publishing and Netgalley for allowing me to read this in exchange for an unbiased review.Publish date September 25, 2012

  7. Cheryl Cheryl says:

    one forgets that the point of life is death The story seemingly describes a culture clash, between traditional Moroccan Muslims trying to scratch out a living and affluent Westerners who have too much of a living But it could equally have been set in a vast country estate of the wealthy in 19th century Britain, pitting the lords against the peasants.Or in the crowded streets of New York.I just realized what this story has in common with The Bonfire of the Vanities a car driven by a rich p one forgets that the point of life is death The story seemingly describes a culture clash, between traditional Moroccan Muslims trying to scratch out a living and affluent Westerners who have too much of a living But it could equally have been set in a vast country estate of the wealthy in 19th century Britain, pitting the lords against the peasants.Or in the crowded streets of New York.I just realized what this story has in common with The Bonfire of the Vanities a car driven by a rich person hits a poor person of a different race in a different country the Bronx was like a different country to Sherman McCoy The plot lines diverge, but we are provoked in to considering the moralities at play.Who is to be forgiven In this case, most obviously forgive the driver that killed the man But by the end of the book I am asking who, or who else Should it be the boy whose perceived criminal intent put into motion the series of events that culminated in his own death And because of this, he deprives his own father of his only son Should it be view spoiler the father who harbors uncertain murderous intent Should it be the young man who ultimately carries out the intention of his dead friend hide spoiler Should it be everyone, because everyone has done, will do, wrong that is what it is to be human But maybe it is referring to the sense of entitlement of the perpetual colonialists, the expats, who seem to feel as if nothing is their fault, as if everything they ve done wrong should be forgiven because they wouldn t have done it if events or actions by others had not impelled them The adult manifestation of the child s plaintive cry, But he made me do it It s not fair I wouldn t have done this if he hadn t done that Their relative wealth confers great power over the natives The powerful are forgiven the subjugated are punished What is the distance between revenge and forgiveness

  8. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    I chose to read this book based on the books synopsis on Goodreads It sounded alluring What I found this book to be was the Great Gatsby set in Morrocco Full of superficial wealthy characters who spend there days worrying about what they will eat next and what parties they will go smoke weed at or get drunk at next I also felt the author gave way too much detail on insigniciant parts of the story I cant say that he doesn t pay attention to detail, it was overkill though Political commentar I chose to read this book based on the books synopsis on Goodreads It sounded alluring What I found this book to be was the Great Gatsby set in Morrocco Full of superficial wealthy characters who spend there days worrying about what they will eat next and what parties they will go smoke weed at or get drunk at next I also felt the author gave way too much detail on insigniciant parts of the story I cant say that he doesn t pay attention to detail, it was overkill though Political commentary on Muslims, Americans, Iraq, etc I think he had to make to storyline fit the title and it wasn t really smooth I am sure glad this was a free download from my library

  9. Jason Pettus Jason Pettus says:

    Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography cclapcenter.com I am the original author of this review, as well as the owner of CCLaP it is not being reprinted illegally Now that I m finished with it, I find myself having a hard time deciding what exactly to think of critical darling and professional nomad Lawrence Osborne s latest novel, the engaging but also meandering The Forgiven Because on the one hand, its Graham Greene meets the Tea Party setting is going to be Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography cclapcenter.com I am the original author of this review, as well as the owner of CCLaP it is not being reprinted illegally Now that I m finished with it, I find myself having a hard time deciding what exactly to think of critical darling and professional nomad Lawrence Osborne s latest novel, the engaging but also meandering The Forgiven Because on the one hand, its Graham Greene meets the Tea Party setting is going to be fascinating to most sheltered Westerners like myself almost the entire story takes place within a former Moroccan village that an upper class gay British couple have bought in its entirety and turned into a private sybaritic estate, where the former family hovels have been turned into WiFi equipped guest bungalows, and once a year a week long orgy of drugs and group sex is thrown for the spoiled globetrotters who fly in specifically for it, so notorious that it regularly makes the society pages back in the UK and US publications where most of the guests are from And the plot that this veteran journalist and academic favorite places within this setting is fascinating as well two of the guests, a bickering middle aged British couple, decide to drive to the compound from the airport themselves, accidentally hitting and killing a local African teen in the middle of the night while the driver is slightly sauced, which serves as the catalyst for both a blow up and deconstruction of their crumbling marriage, the husband s growing alcoholism, the wife s infidelity, the hosts tongue in cheek imperialist lifestyle, and even such local issues as scared bravado masked as fiery political rhetoric, and pride versus familial duties But on the other hand, it takes an awfully big suspension of disbelief to buy into the main plot turn that fuels the entire second half of the book that the drunken spoiled vehicular manslaughterer in question would voluntarily ride into the desert with the father of the slain teen and his knife wielding buddies, for a weekend of penance and possible extortion to atone for the accident with the entire book sort of falling apart if you don t buy into this unlikely turn of events plus there s the fact that, while Osborne provides satisfyingly complex looks at his white characters, he often falls back on lazy cliches for the local Moroccans, and of course the age old argument among academic character heavy novels that not a whole lot actually happens once this wonderfully complex milieu is established, although by definition this will bother some people a lot less than others So when all is said and done, in general I recommend the book but with some caveats, that you need to be ready for a slower paced story whose main joy is merely in lazily lounging among the characters in question, and not in finding out what happens next If you re able to do this, you ll find in The Forgiven a beautifully written, thought provoking examination of 21st century imperialism, and the debate over whether this attitude is simply baked into all Westerners from childhood by default or if it s a specific result of the same sociopathic urge that drives the One Percenters to become those people in the first place.Out of 10 8.8

  10. Tuck Tuck says:

    if you know osbonrne s writings The Accidental Connoisseur An Irreverent Journey Through the Wine World you ll know, and expect, full on sensuality and food wine porn of the most yummy sort, and this novel brings you all that, plus too, evocation of place that is both factual seeming and seductive, even when it is 120 degrees in the shade and flies are biting so, Morocco, 21st century, a 1%er s posh re vamped and air conditioned hill top fort, fossil sellers out the ass, local boys as the if you know osbonrne s writings The Accidental Connoisseur An Irreverent Journey Through the Wine World you ll know, and expect, full on sensuality and food wine porn of the most yummy sort, and this novel brings you all that, plus too, evocation of place that is both factual seeming and seductive, even when it is 120 degrees in the shade and flies are biting so, Morocco, 21st century, a 1%er s posh re vamped and air conditioned hill top fort, fossil sellers out the ass, local boys as the servants, even a damn sir or lord or whatever helicoptering in from uk then of course the piggy euros accidentally kill a hard working, innocent young hard working muslim hillbilly out in the middle of the desert in the middle of the night on a lonely empty highway, in a dust storm, of course tongue out of cheek now and now we havethan just a clash of west v east modern v tradish muslim v chistian v hedon but also death, sadness, unfairness, face, restitution, justice, imperialism, etc etc. so on that thin as sand plot and some harsh juxtapositions the reader is plunged into the bowles family back scene with lots of garcia lorca imaging and d h lawrence clean clean dirtiness so read it for the beauty of date palms swishing, and russian women swimming and sandwiches in the hamper all cool and crisp in the hot hot sun, and forget the thin thin sand and five villages of some damn hamada that is tibesti well, could be tibesti anyway, might as well be where one village is lousier than the other four yeah forget that part of the plot the trilobites are just there for atmosphere, that is if they are not the most important part of this lovely novel

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