Paperback ↠ De Datameesters PDF Þ

Paperback ↠ De Datameesters PDF Þ



10 thoughts on “De Datameesters

  1. David David says:

    I was expecting a book about the people who are exploiting big data I expected to hear about the people who analyze the huge data sets that are proliferating through our society There is a little bit of that, but mostly I read about the technology itself, and the myriad of ways in which it is being used in all facets of life Very interesting, but the title is misleading.The problem is that the author is a journalist, and he writes the book like a memoir of some of his interviews He mention I was expecting a book about the people who are exploiting big data I expected to hear about the people who analyze the huge data sets that are proliferating through our society There is a little bit of that, but mostly I read about the technology itself, and the myriad of ways in which it is being used in all facets of life Very interesting, but the title is misleading.The problem is that the author is a journalist, and he writes the book like a memoir of some of his interviews He mentions some of the buzz words like neural networks, support vector machine, Bayesian inference, but he does not show any understanding of these concepts The author could have gotten some help from a real technologist, to co author the book and explain these concepts There is a lot of discussion about the applications for big data, but very little about the how the algorithms work I guess my problem is that I am prejudiced against journalists writing books on subjects for which they are not experts I much prefer to read books by experts in the field, who are also good communicators.On the other hand, the book casts a wide net over many applications for big data The chapter on medical information was fascinating Sensors in our homes, and perhaps even in our bodies may allow doctors to remotely monitor our health The trick is to filter the immense amount of information, and summarize it in an easy to digest format Send out an alert when something isn t right, but make sure that false alarms don t prevail.Big data is being used by politicians, by companies large and small, by retailers, intelligence agencies, and online dating sites The author describes an interesting experiment he conducted with his wife They both enrolled on an online dating site, to see if the algorithms would find that they are a good match for one another


  2. Brian Brian says:

    well i thought this would be the next malcolm gladwell, steven levitt masterpiece, but instead it s a book that has a catchy title cover and even a great premise, but the author Stephen Baker fails to deliver much new information about how the world is watching our every move could ve condensed the entire book to a magazine article.


  3. Alger Alger says:

    This is a book that has not aged well, which is not surprising since the purpose was to be timely, but there are points in these pages that reveal just how shallow Baker s understanding of this topic is This lack of depth is especially regretted since the particular moment he was writing in was a remarkable period The 2000 s were a decade of radical changes in approaches to data mining and modeling, largely coming out of incredible leaps in processing speed and capability Inventive algorithms This is a book that has not aged well, which is not surprising since the purpose was to be timely, but there are points in these pages that reveal just how shallow Baker s understanding of this topic is This lack of depth is especially regretted since the particular moment he was writing in was a remarkable period The 2000 s were a decade of radical changes in approaches to data mining and modeling, largely coming out of incredible leaps in processing speed and capability Inventive algorithms and cheap data storage essentially put data mining at the center of everyone s business plan Since 2010 the Big Data project has pretty much ossified into a set of standard approaches that are proven to be robust and has almost entirely rebutted all of Baker s key ideas, and the kind of pie or eye in the sky hyperbole that Baker indulges in here is nothing but nonsense pushed forward by a minority and already viewed as unuseful and overreaching in 2008 If Snowden s act of petty treason did anything, it revealed that in the half a decade after Baker s book went to press, the brightest lights in data mining and modeling with all the money in the world and unfettered access to all of our data were still as bad at organizing the data of individuals along meaningful axes as they were before the patriot act and 9 11, let alone making enough sense from the data to model anyone s behavior well enough to predict who would become the next Osama bin Laden The only significant change in personal metrics and big data in the past decade is the ability to storeand move through it faster Truly the problem is that the modelers are awash in so much data that were the types of data collection issues that are the only parts of the book that Baker has a handle on the bottleneck on the road to a modeled future of the kind he predicts, then we would have passed some critical threshold some years ago Instead, none of his predictions hold up, and I don t think Baker understands why or really cares.A math illiterate journalist s approach to a technical topic written to formula borrowed from writers like Thomas Friedman daily example, specific angle derived from the daily example, meet the excited expert who is given to exciting statements about exciting changes , possible problems, brush aside problems with a light laugh and move on with an occasionally bizarre choice of example i.e holding up the market crash of 2007 8 as an example of well intentioned but flawed market modeling rather than criminal behavior and an optimistic misunderstanding of the realities throughout


  4. Thom Thom says:

    Journalist Stephen L Baker wrote this forward thinking book nearly 10 years ago, connecting math to computer assessments of the population and describing the results While the history is good, the current analysis and future predictions are a ways off.The authors math seems up to the challenge, but he underestimates the power and storage of computers and overestimates the cleverness of algorithmic methods The result is chapters on topics which seem very dated The writing style is anecdotal a Journalist Stephen L Baker wrote this forward thinking book nearly 10 years ago, connecting math to computer assessments of the population and describing the results While the history is good, the current analysis and future predictions are a ways off.The authors math seems up to the challenge, but he underestimates the power and storage of computers and overestimates the cleverness of algorithmic methods The result is chapters on topics which seem very dated The writing style is anecdotal and the research too personal for my tastes.Perhaps the most interesting chapter was on medical monitoring, which the author says will work best if it is truly voluntary Enter fitbit and google ordevices to speak to users, and it should be a short time before the tracked information is not stored in raw form but as part of a model With that, Alexa and their ilk should be able to warn us when they notice signs of medical problems before it is too late.Those models don t exist outside of a few labs, and until they do and are somehow focused into sellable products , the rest of us will miss out The reams of data still being collected are at a higher risk of being used against us instead of for us This book unfortunately doesn t go far enough into this topic either.Goodreads uses one star for did not like it and five for Awesome This book comes in just under the two star category, it was okay and perhaps would have rated higher upon first release


  5. Jimmy Ele Jimmy Ele says:

    The Math Intelligentsia dubbed the Numerati by Stephen Baker are modeling us humans in almost every aspect of our humanity The book is divided into different chapters Introduction, Worker, Shopper, Blogger, Terrorist, Lover, and Conclusion A very interesting read that delves into the different groups of people and corporations that benefit from such information we readily give away with just a few clicks on the computer, and or our cell phone usage among other things The most interesting cha The Math Intelligentsia dubbed the Numerati by Stephen Baker are modeling us humans in almost every aspect of our humanity The book is divided into different chapters Introduction, Worker, Shopper, Blogger, Terrorist, Lover, and Conclusion A very interesting read that delves into the different groups of people and corporations that benefit from such information we readily give away with just a few clicks on the computer, and or our cell phone usage among other things The most interesting chapter for me was the lover chapter Figuring out how to mathematically model humans according to their serotonin, dopamine, estrogen, and testosterone levels is supremely interesting There is a great look into the websites chemistry.com as well as match.com I recommend this book for those who want to learnabout these men behind the scenes and a nice surface look at the different mathematical modeling techniques they use and the industries that they are generating


  6. Natalia Natalia says:

    I was disapointed with this book It s a full length book about the use of statistical methods and data mining to model people but there is no discussion at all of those statistical methods or data mining techniques It s full of talk about the data that s collected, and the predictions that are or could potentially be made, but the middle bit, the way that analysis actually happens is simply not addressed.Now, I understand that other people are not as interested in statistics as I am I get I was disapointed with this book It s a full length book about the use of statistical methods and data mining to model people but there is no discussion at all of those statistical methods or data mining techniques It s full of talk about the data that s collected, and the predictions that are or could potentially be made, but the middle bit, the way that analysis actually happens is simply not addressed.Now, I understand that other people are not as interested in statistics as I am I get that However, people manage to write extremely accessible pop sci books about neurology, evolutionary biology, economics, etc so why is statistical analysis something to be treated like a black box This book brings up some interesting things, but ultimately, it s just a little too fluffy


  7. Desiree Desiree says:

    I think I would have liked this book if the author had givenspecifics Yes, I am sure we all know by now that we are being tracked Computers are powerful enough to sift through massive amounts of data and their results will becomeanduseful as time goes on I am about to tackle a related book called Click, which I may findinteresting


  8. David Wake David Wake says:

    Very interesting raw information disturbing, I guess you d say But a little disappointing on the analysis side Maybe the purpose of this kind of book is simply to scare you by listing all the kinds of things that you do that aren t private any, but I was sort of hoping to getof a what should we make of this kind of take as well.


  9. Macey Macey says:

    This book was a very difficult read The content and reading level was not the challenging part it was the boring content The author, Steven Baker, writes in a way that makes the fascinating topic unbearable The book is about how mathematicians use our information to make a profile on us He writes in a repetitive way that over explains and gives too much detail about the topic He gave too much informations that way unnecessary It was very hard to keep reading the book.


  10. Erik Erik says:

    Its perhaps to early to be writing this, seeing how I just finished the book less than a minute ago, but there was a sentence I read in Baker s conclusion that I felt summed up the whole book or at least what I felt to be the most important That sentence being This becomes true only because we let ourselves believe it This sentence pertains to our feelings about the Numerati and what it is they are doing Our feelings on invasion of privacy and the fear of what the information they gath Its perhaps to early to be writing this, seeing how I just finished the book less than a minute ago, but there was a sentence I read in Baker s conclusion that I felt summed up the whole book or at least what I felt to be the most important That sentence being This becomes true only because we let ourselves believe it This sentence pertains to our feelings about the Numerati and what it is they are doing Our feelings on invasion of privacy and the fear of what the information they gather could do to us, individually, and as a whole The scare of such ideas represented in stories such as 1984 fuel the idea that the data accumulated will be used oppressively becomes true only because we let ourselves believe it This is not to say that the Numerati should be left alone to do whatever they see fit, but that we shouldn t arrest the development of what can be accomplished through their task Fear should not hinder development Possibilities in this life are infinite and I view exploration as the definition of freedom No doubt this review and all my reviews are not very practical to a reader wondering wether or not they should check out the book for themselves, but then its my opinion that one should be able to figure that out for themselves I myself don t read reviews because I don t need to It seems plain to me that a book interests you or not, and the only way to decide that is to read it and make up your own mind And if you decide to start reading something to find out, its probably because the book is on a topic your already interested in Maybe reviews are better for the fiction reader looking to find something in the same vein of what they have already established they like, in which case those readers won t be looking at reviews of this book anyways This book is a window into a world that is collectively viewed as worrisome Its informative about what is trying to be done with the mountains of data we leave, and I found it to be pleasant and calming to my own fears that in reality weren t based on anything but misguided information at random Id suggest this book to anyone looking to be better informed on the topic, but then I suppose in writing these reviews Im really doing it for myself, to spell out how I think and feel, and also to throw it up for the Numerati to sift through in the belief that we can use such things to better understand ourselves The frontier of research may be purely guess work, but pushing through allows us to look back at previous frontiers and help us move beyond truths that simply are, because we believe in them To keep moving past the dogma of assumption


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De Datameesters ✼ De Datameesters Epub ✿ Author Stephen Baker – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Elke muisklik, elk telefoontje en elke keer dat je je pinpas of bonuskaart gebruikt je laat voortdurend een spoor van gegevens achter Afzonderlijk lijken deze gegevens misschien onbelangrijk, maar wie Elke muisklik, elk telefoontje en elke keer dat je je pinpas of bonuskaart gebruikt je laat voortdurend een spoor van gegevens achter Afzonderlijk lijken deze gegevens misschien onbelangrijk, maar wie ze aan elkaar knoopt kan verrassend veel over je te weten komen Je lichamelijke en psychische gezondheid, je gemoedstoestand, je seksuele voorkeur en hoe gevoelig je bent voor korting het zijn slechts enkele voorbeelden van de informatie die velen van ons onbewust prijsgevenStephen Baker brengt je naar het kloppende hart van deze ontwikkeling hij laat je kennismaken met een nieuwe generatie wiskundigen die, vaak in dienst van bedrijven, hun talenten inzetten om ons gedrag te ontcijferen De Datameesters zijn zowel fascinerend als angstaanjagend Fascinerend door de hoeveelheid verbeteringen op het gebied van veiligheid, gezondheidszorg en comfort die ze voor ogen hebben Angstaanjagend om de hoeveelheid macht en invloed die ze onderweg zullen vergaren Maak kennis met De Datameesters je kent ze nog niet, maar zij jou wel.

10 thoughts on “De Datameesters

  1. David David says:

    I was expecting a book about the people who are exploiting big data I expected to hear about the people who analyze the huge data sets that are proliferating through our society There is a little bit of that, but mostly I read about the technology itself, and the myriad of ways in which it is being used in all facets of life Very interesting, but the title is misleading.The problem is that the author is a journalist, and he writes the book like a memoir of some of his interviews He mention I was expecting a book about the people who are exploiting big data I expected to hear about the people who analyze the huge data sets that are proliferating through our society There is a little bit of that, but mostly I read about the technology itself, and the myriad of ways in which it is being used in all facets of life Very interesting, but the title is misleading.The problem is that the author is a journalist, and he writes the book like a memoir of some of his interviews He mentions some of the buzz words like neural networks, support vector machine, Bayesian inference, but he does not show any understanding of these concepts The author could have gotten some help from a real technologist, to co author the book and explain these concepts There is a lot of discussion about the applications for big data, but very little about the how the algorithms work I guess my problem is that I am prejudiced against journalists writing books on subjects for which they are not experts I much prefer to read books by experts in the field, who are also good communicators.On the other hand, the book casts a wide net over many applications for big data The chapter on medical information was fascinating Sensors in our homes, and perhaps even in our bodies may allow doctors to remotely monitor our health The trick is to filter the immense amount of information, and summarize it in an easy to digest format Send out an alert when something isn t right, but make sure that false alarms don t prevail.Big data is being used by politicians, by companies large and small, by retailers, intelligence agencies, and online dating sites The author describes an interesting experiment he conducted with his wife They both enrolled on an online dating site, to see if the algorithms would find that they are a good match for one another

  2. Brian Brian says:

    well i thought this would be the next malcolm gladwell, steven levitt masterpiece, but instead it s a book that has a catchy title cover and even a great premise, but the author Stephen Baker fails to deliver much new information about how the world is watching our every move could ve condensed the entire book to a magazine article.

  3. Alger Alger says:

    This is a book that has not aged well, which is not surprising since the purpose was to be timely, but there are points in these pages that reveal just how shallow Baker s understanding of this topic is This lack of depth is especially regretted since the particular moment he was writing in was a remarkable period The 2000 s were a decade of radical changes in approaches to data mining and modeling, largely coming out of incredible leaps in processing speed and capability Inventive algorithms This is a book that has not aged well, which is not surprising since the purpose was to be timely, but there are points in these pages that reveal just how shallow Baker s understanding of this topic is This lack of depth is especially regretted since the particular moment he was writing in was a remarkable period The 2000 s were a decade of radical changes in approaches to data mining and modeling, largely coming out of incredible leaps in processing speed and capability Inventive algorithms and cheap data storage essentially put data mining at the center of everyone s business plan Since 2010 the Big Data project has pretty much ossified into a set of standard approaches that are proven to be robust and has almost entirely rebutted all of Baker s key ideas, and the kind of pie or eye in the sky hyperbole that Baker indulges in here is nothing but nonsense pushed forward by a minority and already viewed as unuseful and overreaching in 2008 If Snowden s act of petty treason did anything, it revealed that in the half a decade after Baker s book went to press, the brightest lights in data mining and modeling with all the money in the world and unfettered access to all of our data were still as bad at organizing the data of individuals along meaningful axes as they were before the patriot act and 9 11, let alone making enough sense from the data to model anyone s behavior well enough to predict who would become the next Osama bin Laden The only significant change in personal metrics and big data in the past decade is the ability to storeand move through it faster Truly the problem is that the modelers are awash in so much data that were the types of data collection issues that are the only parts of the book that Baker has a handle on the bottleneck on the road to a modeled future of the kind he predicts, then we would have passed some critical threshold some years ago Instead, none of his predictions hold up, and I don t think Baker understands why or really cares.A math illiterate journalist s approach to a technical topic written to formula borrowed from writers like Thomas Friedman daily example, specific angle derived from the daily example, meet the excited expert who is given to exciting statements about exciting changes , possible problems, brush aside problems with a light laugh and move on with an occasionally bizarre choice of example i.e holding up the market crash of 2007 8 as an example of well intentioned but flawed market modeling rather than criminal behavior and an optimistic misunderstanding of the realities throughout

  4. Thom Thom says:

    Journalist Stephen L Baker wrote this forward thinking book nearly 10 years ago, connecting math to computer assessments of the population and describing the results While the history is good, the current analysis and future predictions are a ways off.The authors math seems up to the challenge, but he underestimates the power and storage of computers and overestimates the cleverness of algorithmic methods The result is chapters on topics which seem very dated The writing style is anecdotal a Journalist Stephen L Baker wrote this forward thinking book nearly 10 years ago, connecting math to computer assessments of the population and describing the results While the history is good, the current analysis and future predictions are a ways off.The authors math seems up to the challenge, but he underestimates the power and storage of computers and overestimates the cleverness of algorithmic methods The result is chapters on topics which seem very dated The writing style is anecdotal and the research too personal for my tastes.Perhaps the most interesting chapter was on medical monitoring, which the author says will work best if it is truly voluntary Enter fitbit and google ordevices to speak to users, and it should be a short time before the tracked information is not stored in raw form but as part of a model With that, Alexa and their ilk should be able to warn us when they notice signs of medical problems before it is too late.Those models don t exist outside of a few labs, and until they do and are somehow focused into sellable products , the rest of us will miss out The reams of data still being collected are at a higher risk of being used against us instead of for us This book unfortunately doesn t go far enough into this topic either.Goodreads uses one star for did not like it and five for Awesome This book comes in just under the two star category, it was okay and perhaps would have rated higher upon first release

  5. Jimmy Ele Jimmy Ele says:

    The Math Intelligentsia dubbed the Numerati by Stephen Baker are modeling us humans in almost every aspect of our humanity The book is divided into different chapters Introduction, Worker, Shopper, Blogger, Terrorist, Lover, and Conclusion A very interesting read that delves into the different groups of people and corporations that benefit from such information we readily give away with just a few clicks on the computer, and or our cell phone usage among other things The most interesting cha The Math Intelligentsia dubbed the Numerati by Stephen Baker are modeling us humans in almost every aspect of our humanity The book is divided into different chapters Introduction, Worker, Shopper, Blogger, Terrorist, Lover, and Conclusion A very interesting read that delves into the different groups of people and corporations that benefit from such information we readily give away with just a few clicks on the computer, and or our cell phone usage among other things The most interesting chapter for me was the lover chapter Figuring out how to mathematically model humans according to their serotonin, dopamine, estrogen, and testosterone levels is supremely interesting There is a great look into the websites chemistry.com as well as match.com I recommend this book for those who want to learnabout these men behind the scenes and a nice surface look at the different mathematical modeling techniques they use and the industries that they are generating

  6. Natalia Natalia says:

    I was disapointed with this book It s a full length book about the use of statistical methods and data mining to model people but there is no discussion at all of those statistical methods or data mining techniques It s full of talk about the data that s collected, and the predictions that are or could potentially be made, but the middle bit, the way that analysis actually happens is simply not addressed.Now, I understand that other people are not as interested in statistics as I am I get I was disapointed with this book It s a full length book about the use of statistical methods and data mining to model people but there is no discussion at all of those statistical methods or data mining techniques It s full of talk about the data that s collected, and the predictions that are or could potentially be made, but the middle bit, the way that analysis actually happens is simply not addressed.Now, I understand that other people are not as interested in statistics as I am I get that However, people manage to write extremely accessible pop sci books about neurology, evolutionary biology, economics, etc so why is statistical analysis something to be treated like a black box This book brings up some interesting things, but ultimately, it s just a little too fluffy

  7. Desiree Desiree says:

    I think I would have liked this book if the author had givenspecifics Yes, I am sure we all know by now that we are being tracked Computers are powerful enough to sift through massive amounts of data and their results will becomeanduseful as time goes on I am about to tackle a related book called Click, which I may findinteresting

  8. David Wake David Wake says:

    Very interesting raw information disturbing, I guess you d say But a little disappointing on the analysis side Maybe the purpose of this kind of book is simply to scare you by listing all the kinds of things that you do that aren t private any, but I was sort of hoping to getof a what should we make of this kind of take as well.

  9. Macey Macey says:

    This book was a very difficult read The content and reading level was not the challenging part it was the boring content The author, Steven Baker, writes in a way that makes the fascinating topic unbearable The book is about how mathematicians use our information to make a profile on us He writes in a repetitive way that over explains and gives too much detail about the topic He gave too much informations that way unnecessary It was very hard to keep reading the book.

  10. Erik Erik says:

    Its perhaps to early to be writing this, seeing how I just finished the book less than a minute ago, but there was a sentence I read in Baker s conclusion that I felt summed up the whole book or at least what I felt to be the most important That sentence being This becomes true only because we let ourselves believe it This sentence pertains to our feelings about the Numerati and what it is they are doing Our feelings on invasion of privacy and the fear of what the information they gath Its perhaps to early to be writing this, seeing how I just finished the book less than a minute ago, but there was a sentence I read in Baker s conclusion that I felt summed up the whole book or at least what I felt to be the most important That sentence being This becomes true only because we let ourselves believe it This sentence pertains to our feelings about the Numerati and what it is they are doing Our feelings on invasion of privacy and the fear of what the information they gather could do to us, individually, and as a whole The scare of such ideas represented in stories such as 1984 fuel the idea that the data accumulated will be used oppressively becomes true only because we let ourselves believe it This is not to say that the Numerati should be left alone to do whatever they see fit, but that we shouldn t arrest the development of what can be accomplished through their task Fear should not hinder development Possibilities in this life are infinite and I view exploration as the definition of freedom No doubt this review and all my reviews are not very practical to a reader wondering wether or not they should check out the book for themselves, but then its my opinion that one should be able to figure that out for themselves I myself don t read reviews because I don t need to It seems plain to me that a book interests you or not, and the only way to decide that is to read it and make up your own mind And if you decide to start reading something to find out, its probably because the book is on a topic your already interested in Maybe reviews are better for the fiction reader looking to find something in the same vein of what they have already established they like, in which case those readers won t be looking at reviews of this book anyways This book is a window into a world that is collectively viewed as worrisome Its informative about what is trying to be done with the mountains of data we leave, and I found it to be pleasant and calming to my own fears that in reality weren t based on anything but misguided information at random Id suggest this book to anyone looking to be better informed on the topic, but then I suppose in writing these reviews Im really doing it for myself, to spell out how I think and feel, and also to throw it up for the Numerati to sift through in the belief that we can use such things to better understand ourselves The frontier of research may be purely guess work, but pushing through allows us to look back at previous frontiers and help us move beyond truths that simply are, because we believe in them To keep moving past the dogma of assumption

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