Lamar Hunt: A Life in Sports PDF ç A Life eBook

Lamar Hunt: A Life in Sports PDF ç A Life eBook

Lamar Hunt: A Life in Sports [Download] ✤ Lamar Hunt: A Life in Sports Author Michael MacCambridge – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Written by award winning author Michael MacCambridge, this is the definitive, official biography of one of the th century s most important and beloved sporting figures the soft spoken, strong willed m Written by award A Life eBook ↠ winning author Michael MacCambridge, this is the definitive, official biography of one of the th century s most important and beloved sporting figures the soft spoken, strong willed man whose audacious challenge to the National Football League transformed American sports Hunt revolutionized three different sports pro football, tennis, and soccer winding up in the Hall of Fame of each Drawing onyears of Hunt s personal papers and thaninterviews, MacCambridge provides an intimate, original portrait Lamar Hunt: PDF/EPUB ² of the man forever captivated by these serious pursuits we call games I can t separate what part of pro football is business and what part is personal with me, he said I just know that it is very important that I succeed He had loved games as a young boy, had played them as a young man, and now, as a naive but determinedyear old in the summer of , Lamar Hunt announced that he was going Hunt: A Life PDF Ë to launch a new football leagueWhat he couldn t possibly have known on that day was that the forces of the entrenched National Football League would soon be arrayed against him The league would place its own team in his hometown of Dallas, in direct competition with his team, and would attempt to undermine the new league, trying on repeated occasions before that first season to prevent the new American Football League from ever startingAnd what the NFL couldn t have known, but would soon find out, was that Hunt, the mild mannered, bespectacled son of legendary oilman H L Hunt, had an indomitable will, and patience beyond his years Resolute and innovative, he successfully launched the AFL and, seven years later, helped broker a merger deal, which created the need for a championship game between the two leagues Then he came up with the name of the game the Super BowlNever before, and not since, has anyone with so many resources spent so much time watching, participating in, and being captivated by the absorbing ritual of sports and the suspended state of play His accomplishments would put him in the company of the other giants of American sports Charles C Cash and Carry Pyle, Abe Saperstein, George Halas, Branch Rickey, Red Auerbach, Pete Rozelle Each was present at a revolution But Hunt, significantly, was present at a number of revolutions And he was the catalyst for each one Before his death in , Hunt revolutionized three different sports pro football, tennis, and soccer winding up in the Hall of Fame of eachWritten by award winning author Michael MacCambridge, Lamar Hunt A Life In Sports is the definitive and official biography of one of the th century s most important and beloved sporting figures the soft spoken, strong willed man whose audacious challenge to the NFL transformed the landscape of American sports, but only served as an opening act to his epic sporting journey Drawing onyears of Hunt s personal papers and thaninterviews, author Michael MacCambridge provides an intimate, original portrait of the man forever captivated by these serious pursuits we call games.


10 thoughts on “Lamar Hunt: A Life in Sports

  1. Betsy Betsy says:

    For me, this was one of the best sports books I have read Having grown up in KC and then living in Dallas, it was wonderful to relive all the excitement of the Chiefs in their heyday as well as being in the midst of the WCT in Dallas when it was so popular along with the Dallas Tornado soccer club Lamar was never passionate about the oil business but instead totally immersed himself in sports While his accomplishments are too numerous to list, his main one was the creation of the American Foo For me, this was one of the best sports books I have read Having grown up in KC and then living in Dallas, it was wonderful to relive all the excitement of the Chiefs in their heyday as well as being in the midst of the WCT in Dallas when it was so popular along with the Dallas Tornado soccer club Lamar was never passionate about the oil business but instead totally immersed himself in sports While his accomplishments are too numerous to list, his main one was the creation of the American Football League and later working a merger with the NFL into what it is today He gave the championship game the name Super Bowl , and he is credited with bringing both tennis and soccer to its prominence in America by creating the WCT as well as a US Soccer league before most Americans even knew what soccer was He did so muchbut the best part about the man was his integrity, his kindness, his ever positive attitude and his willingness to make decisions based on what was the best for all teams or those affected, not just for his teams or himself If only all sports owners were even half the kind of man Lamar was


  2. Jim Jim says:

    He is not remembered, like his father, for being a mythic figure of oil and politics and manifest destiny Instead, Lamar Hunt was renowned because he was perhaps the most unusual combination ever of decency, innovation, secretiveness, optimism, persistence, naivete, politesse, shyness, loyalty, and an irrepressible love of the moment In the pantheon of American sports, especially football and notably coaches and owners, the names of Halas, Lombardi, and Brown come easily to mind And yet, aHe is not remembered, like his father, for being a mythic figure of oil and politics and manifest destiny Instead, Lamar Hunt was renowned because he was perhaps the most unusual combination ever of decency, innovation, secretiveness, optimism, persistence, naivete, politesse, shyness, loyalty, and an irrepressible love of the moment In the pantheon of American sports, especially football and notably coaches and owners, the names of Halas, Lombardi, and Brown come easily to mind And yet, a Texas born son of an well known and powerful oil man, has shaped the game we watch today in ways that if not overshadow at least stands tall above a long time and influential owner in the NFL , a legendary coach whose teams won the first two Super Bowls, and perhaps the game s most innovative offensive genus But Lamar Hunt didthan influence and shape the game of contemporary American football, he shaped and influenced the landscape of sports around the world in ways that many of us have yet to realize.Michael MacCambridge takes us on a journey to help us discover just how much and how far Lamar Hunt, a shy and polite man who often downplayed his wealth, yet used it to bring spectator sports in America to a new level, changed the nature and status of sports in late 20th century AmericaTo understand all that he had accomplished, it was useful to remember how humble and provincial the American sports industry was in the late 50s The games, even then, were a vital part of the leisure time of a group of spirited, youthful minded people But in 1959, one could walk down a street in virtually any major city in America, and see no evidence whatsoever of the existence of spectator sports in the country By the time of Lamar s death, sports had breached the walls of mainstream culture, and insinuated itself into the daily fabric of American media, discourse and popular culture pages 345 346 Published by Andrews MacMeel Publishing, Lamar Hunt A Life in Sports takes us back to a time in Texas, and really in America, where college football, especially in Texas ruled the hearts of men and women and small boys who became fascinated with the latest college stars But as the nation grew and expanded in the 1950 s professional football began to catch professional baseball for the hearts and wallets of the American sports public The city of Dallas, well in the heartland of America, had tried to ensure that professional football would gain a foothold in Texas But it did not and after the 1952 Dallas Texans folded, college football remained the game for Texas.Until Lamar Hunt began in the late 50 s to seek to bring a new NFL team to Dallas.And then as MacCambridge tells it, rebuffed, Hunt decided to start a new league which created a response from the NFL and then as America entered the 1960 s, created a clash, then a competition, and finally a merger between the upstart league, the AFL American Football League and the NFL that has shaped the game and the culture as we know it today.But Hunt was not done Attending a World Cup game in the mid 1960 s he determined to bring the Cup to America and make soccer at home in America He did it but it took him 30 years and really the rest of his life to make it part of the main stream of American sports First with the North America Soccer League NASL which eventually folded in the mid 1980 s and then the MLS or Major League Soccer in 1996 with Hunt owning several teams and getting two soccer specific stadiums built one in Columbus Ohio and in the Dallas, Texas area.And then there was tennis where Lamar challenged the long held traditions and set the tennis world on its ear.And MacCambridge tells all of this and , the personal behind the scenes, challenges, triumphs, and tragedy of Lamar Hunt and his family and his loves, as he presents lovers of spectator sports and of the history of sports the story of a man who loved to sit in the stands with the fans and do things to bring them into the stands of the stadiums that he would see built.Clearly written and comprehensive in scope, Lamar Hunt A Life in Sports is a wonderful introduction to man I had heard of but had no idea what he had helped to make happen in his life time It draws on interviews with his family and close friends and presents a comprehensive picture of a loved man who love sports and devoted his life to make sports main stream.I liked this book because it gave me a new and unique view of American sports history in my lifetime.I rate this book an outstanding read.Note I received a galley copy of this book from the publisher via Net Galley I was not required to write a positive review


  3. Taylor Taylor says:

    When asked about his son Lamar Hunt s one million dollar loss after the inaugural AFL season, H.L Hunt then estimated to be the richest American replied, At that rate he can only last another 150 years Lamar, not content with being the scion of a multi national oil baron, veered from the family business to pursue his passion in sports, most notably the burgeoning professional football Those outside America s heartland or now readers of this book are largely unaware of the impact Lamar had When asked about his son Lamar Hunt s one million dollar loss after the inaugural AFL season, H.L Hunt then estimated to be the richest American replied, At that rate he can only last another 150 years Lamar, not content with being the scion of a multi national oil baron, veered from the family business to pursue his passion in sports, most notably the burgeoning professional football Those outside America s heartland or now readers of this book are largely unaware of the impact Lamar had on the landscape of America s most popular sport His innovations, which included negotiating lucrative TV contracts with major networks, revenue sharing among franchises to establish greater competitive balance, the proliferation of offense and the passing game, expansion into new markets particularly in the south and west and ultimately the merger which led to today s great showcase the Super Bowl Not to mention, his contributions to the sports of soccer and tennis, which along with professional football each bestowed him membership in their respective Hall of Fame In 1963, Lamar shared a cab in New York City with his newly signed 1st Round draft choice LB Bobby Bell Upon arriving at their hotel, Lamar had to bum cab fair from Bell because he was routinely cash broke That sums up the story of the shy, polite man who often downplayed his wealth, but used it to revolution pro sports into what we know it as today


  4. Dale Stonehouse Dale Stonehouse says:

    I m sure most Kansas City sports fans would say if you didn t like Lamar Hunt then you don t like anybody The great story of this man is that while born into immense oil wealth, he had little interest in oil or making fortunes Instead he forged a lifetime of friendship and camaraderie in relationships developed through his love of sports, football primarily Because he wanted to ensure there would always be a viable league for his dream of owning a professional football team, he placed the wel I m sure most Kansas City sports fans would say if you didn t like Lamar Hunt then you don t like anybody The great story of this man is that while born into immense oil wealth, he had little interest in oil or making fortunes Instead he forged a lifetime of friendship and camaraderie in relationships developed through his love of sports, football primarily Because he wanted to ensure there would always be a viable league for his dream of owning a professional football team, he placed the welfare of an entire league above making sure his was a winning team The author makes one misstep in not mentioning that NFL founder and Chicago Bears owner George Halas routinely traded some of his best players to rival teams when the imbalance in talent was preventing competitive balance Hunt took it a step further with TV revenue sharing, a radical concept in 1960 Non soccer or tennis fans may find details of Hunt s ventures in them a bit dry


  5. Mark Mark says:

    Unsure if the author skipped over any dirty niblets of Hunt s life he did include H.L Hunt s multiple families , but, generally, a nice biography Learned a lot Had zero clue as to how involved in soccer he was including his undying quest to make the game succeed at a professional level in the United States and even going to every World Cup with the idea of visiting all of the participating stadiums Also did not know about his involvement with the touring tennis league or how amateur the s Unsure if the author skipped over any dirty niblets of Hunt s life he did include H.L Hunt s multiple families , but, generally, a nice biography Learned a lot Had zero clue as to how involved in soccer he was including his undying quest to make the game succeed at a professional level in the United States and even going to every World Cup with the idea of visiting all of the participating stadiums Also did not know about his involvement with the touring tennis league or how amateur the sport was in the 1960s I could ve really done fordetails on the creation of the AFL and the merger with the NFL Maybe the author included all there was to it, but I felt he stuck with Hunt s involvement


  6. James Kingman James Kingman says:

    As a specific history of any one of Hunt s interests, this book does not serve Otherspecific histories of Soccer in the US, the AFC, the spread of Tennis, or the dynasty of the Hunts and other oil fortunes in America are all available But this is clearly not the aim of this book Lamar Hunt was a man who could have, and perhaps should have, been a squandering wastrel gifted with obnoxious wealth Instead, he was a quietly determined and graceful man who showed through his life and the li As a specific history of any one of Hunt s interests, this book does not serve Otherspecific histories of Soccer in the US, the AFC, the spread of Tennis, or the dynasty of the Hunts and other oil fortunes in America are all available But this is clearly not the aim of this book Lamar Hunt was a man who could have, and perhaps should have, been a squandering wastrel gifted with obnoxious wealth Instead, he was a quietly determined and graceful man who showed through his life and the lives that he touched that, despite all privilege, decency and hardwork will leave the world better than you found it


  7. Dan Ward Dan Ward says:

    If this book could have lightly mentioned Tennis and Soccer and focusedon football it would have been infinitelyinteresting I ended up skipping over the Tennis and Soccer sections It seems like Mr Hunt was a very decent man that everyone liked Unfortunately for the Chiefs it also seems that his ventures in others sports as well as the legal issues he encountered directly affected the quality of the football team It was very interesting to read about the AFL creation and eventual If this book could have lightly mentioned Tennis and Soccer and focusedon football it would have been infinitelyinteresting I ended up skipping over the Tennis and Soccer sections It seems like Mr Hunt was a very decent man that everyone liked Unfortunately for the Chiefs it also seems that his ventures in others sports as well as the legal issues he encountered directly affected the quality of the football team It was very interesting to read about the AFL creation and eventual merger and Hunts role therein If you are a football fan this book is worth the read


  8. Garrick Infanger Garrick Infanger says:

    The book was only three stars, but Lamar Hunt was worth five What an innovative and humble giant in the world of sports The book is unfortunately a typical year by year look at his life with painful details of individual games and summer road trips I enjoyed it immensely, but I don t know anyone else on earth with my interest in the business of sports.


  9. Paul Carr Paul Carr says:

    Excellent portrait of maybe the most influential man in U.S sports history Recommended.


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10 thoughts on “Lamar Hunt: A Life in Sports

  1. Betsy Betsy says:

    For me, this was one of the best sports books I have read Having grown up in KC and then living in Dallas, it was wonderful to relive all the excitement of the Chiefs in their heyday as well as being in the midst of the WCT in Dallas when it was so popular along with the Dallas Tornado soccer club Lamar was never passionate about the oil business but instead totally immersed himself in sports While his accomplishments are too numerous to list, his main one was the creation of the American Foo For me, this was one of the best sports books I have read Having grown up in KC and then living in Dallas, it was wonderful to relive all the excitement of the Chiefs in their heyday as well as being in the midst of the WCT in Dallas when it was so popular along with the Dallas Tornado soccer club Lamar was never passionate about the oil business but instead totally immersed himself in sports While his accomplishments are too numerous to list, his main one was the creation of the American Football League and later working a merger with the NFL into what it is today He gave the championship game the name Super Bowl , and he is credited with bringing both tennis and soccer to its prominence in America by creating the WCT as well as a US Soccer league before most Americans even knew what soccer was He did so muchbut the best part about the man was his integrity, his kindness, his ever positive attitude and his willingness to make decisions based on what was the best for all teams or those affected, not just for his teams or himself If only all sports owners were even half the kind of man Lamar was

  2. Jim Jim says:

    He is not remembered, like his father, for being a mythic figure of oil and politics and manifest destiny Instead, Lamar Hunt was renowned because he was perhaps the most unusual combination ever of decency, innovation, secretiveness, optimism, persistence, naivete, politesse, shyness, loyalty, and an irrepressible love of the moment In the pantheon of American sports, especially football and notably coaches and owners, the names of Halas, Lombardi, and Brown come easily to mind And yet, aHe is not remembered, like his father, for being a mythic figure of oil and politics and manifest destiny Instead, Lamar Hunt was renowned because he was perhaps the most unusual combination ever of decency, innovation, secretiveness, optimism, persistence, naivete, politesse, shyness, loyalty, and an irrepressible love of the moment In the pantheon of American sports, especially football and notably coaches and owners, the names of Halas, Lombardi, and Brown come easily to mind And yet, a Texas born son of an well known and powerful oil man, has shaped the game we watch today in ways that if not overshadow at least stands tall above a long time and influential owner in the NFL , a legendary coach whose teams won the first two Super Bowls, and perhaps the game s most innovative offensive genus But Lamar Hunt didthan influence and shape the game of contemporary American football, he shaped and influenced the landscape of sports around the world in ways that many of us have yet to realize.Michael MacCambridge takes us on a journey to help us discover just how much and how far Lamar Hunt, a shy and polite man who often downplayed his wealth, yet used it to bring spectator sports in America to a new level, changed the nature and status of sports in late 20th century AmericaTo understand all that he had accomplished, it was useful to remember how humble and provincial the American sports industry was in the late 50s The games, even then, were a vital part of the leisure time of a group of spirited, youthful minded people But in 1959, one could walk down a street in virtually any major city in America, and see no evidence whatsoever of the existence of spectator sports in the country By the time of Lamar s death, sports had breached the walls of mainstream culture, and insinuated itself into the daily fabric of American media, discourse and popular culture pages 345 346 Published by Andrews MacMeel Publishing, Lamar Hunt A Life in Sports takes us back to a time in Texas, and really in America, where college football, especially in Texas ruled the hearts of men and women and small boys who became fascinated with the latest college stars But as the nation grew and expanded in the 1950 s professional football began to catch professional baseball for the hearts and wallets of the American sports public The city of Dallas, well in the heartland of America, had tried to ensure that professional football would gain a foothold in Texas But it did not and after the 1952 Dallas Texans folded, college football remained the game for Texas.Until Lamar Hunt began in the late 50 s to seek to bring a new NFL team to Dallas.And then as MacCambridge tells it, rebuffed, Hunt decided to start a new league which created a response from the NFL and then as America entered the 1960 s, created a clash, then a competition, and finally a merger between the upstart league, the AFL American Football League and the NFL that has shaped the game and the culture as we know it today.But Hunt was not done Attending a World Cup game in the mid 1960 s he determined to bring the Cup to America and make soccer at home in America He did it but it took him 30 years and really the rest of his life to make it part of the main stream of American sports First with the North America Soccer League NASL which eventually folded in the mid 1980 s and then the MLS or Major League Soccer in 1996 with Hunt owning several teams and getting two soccer specific stadiums built one in Columbus Ohio and in the Dallas, Texas area.And then there was tennis where Lamar challenged the long held traditions and set the tennis world on its ear.And MacCambridge tells all of this and , the personal behind the scenes, challenges, triumphs, and tragedy of Lamar Hunt and his family and his loves, as he presents lovers of spectator sports and of the history of sports the story of a man who loved to sit in the stands with the fans and do things to bring them into the stands of the stadiums that he would see built.Clearly written and comprehensive in scope, Lamar Hunt A Life in Sports is a wonderful introduction to man I had heard of but had no idea what he had helped to make happen in his life time It draws on interviews with his family and close friends and presents a comprehensive picture of a loved man who love sports and devoted his life to make sports main stream.I liked this book because it gave me a new and unique view of American sports history in my lifetime.I rate this book an outstanding read.Note I received a galley copy of this book from the publisher via Net Galley I was not required to write a positive review

  3. Taylor Taylor says:

    When asked about his son Lamar Hunt s one million dollar loss after the inaugural AFL season, H.L Hunt then estimated to be the richest American replied, At that rate he can only last another 150 years Lamar, not content with being the scion of a multi national oil baron, veered from the family business to pursue his passion in sports, most notably the burgeoning professional football Those outside America s heartland or now readers of this book are largely unaware of the impact Lamar had When asked about his son Lamar Hunt s one million dollar loss after the inaugural AFL season, H.L Hunt then estimated to be the richest American replied, At that rate he can only last another 150 years Lamar, not content with being the scion of a multi national oil baron, veered from the family business to pursue his passion in sports, most notably the burgeoning professional football Those outside America s heartland or now readers of this book are largely unaware of the impact Lamar had on the landscape of America s most popular sport His innovations, which included negotiating lucrative TV contracts with major networks, revenue sharing among franchises to establish greater competitive balance, the proliferation of offense and the passing game, expansion into new markets particularly in the south and west and ultimately the merger which led to today s great showcase the Super Bowl Not to mention, his contributions to the sports of soccer and tennis, which along with professional football each bestowed him membership in their respective Hall of Fame In 1963, Lamar shared a cab in New York City with his newly signed 1st Round draft choice LB Bobby Bell Upon arriving at their hotel, Lamar had to bum cab fair from Bell because he was routinely cash broke That sums up the story of the shy, polite man who often downplayed his wealth, but used it to revolution pro sports into what we know it as today

  4. Dale Stonehouse Dale Stonehouse says:

    I m sure most Kansas City sports fans would say if you didn t like Lamar Hunt then you don t like anybody The great story of this man is that while born into immense oil wealth, he had little interest in oil or making fortunes Instead he forged a lifetime of friendship and camaraderie in relationships developed through his love of sports, football primarily Because he wanted to ensure there would always be a viable league for his dream of owning a professional football team, he placed the wel I m sure most Kansas City sports fans would say if you didn t like Lamar Hunt then you don t like anybody The great story of this man is that while born into immense oil wealth, he had little interest in oil or making fortunes Instead he forged a lifetime of friendship and camaraderie in relationships developed through his love of sports, football primarily Because he wanted to ensure there would always be a viable league for his dream of owning a professional football team, he placed the welfare of an entire league above making sure his was a winning team The author makes one misstep in not mentioning that NFL founder and Chicago Bears owner George Halas routinely traded some of his best players to rival teams when the imbalance in talent was preventing competitive balance Hunt took it a step further with TV revenue sharing, a radical concept in 1960 Non soccer or tennis fans may find details of Hunt s ventures in them a bit dry

  5. Mark Mark says:

    Unsure if the author skipped over any dirty niblets of Hunt s life he did include H.L Hunt s multiple families , but, generally, a nice biography Learned a lot Had zero clue as to how involved in soccer he was including his undying quest to make the game succeed at a professional level in the United States and even going to every World Cup with the idea of visiting all of the participating stadiums Also did not know about his involvement with the touring tennis league or how amateur the s Unsure if the author skipped over any dirty niblets of Hunt s life he did include H.L Hunt s multiple families , but, generally, a nice biography Learned a lot Had zero clue as to how involved in soccer he was including his undying quest to make the game succeed at a professional level in the United States and even going to every World Cup with the idea of visiting all of the participating stadiums Also did not know about his involvement with the touring tennis league or how amateur the sport was in the 1960s I could ve really done fordetails on the creation of the AFL and the merger with the NFL Maybe the author included all there was to it, but I felt he stuck with Hunt s involvement

  6. James Kingman James Kingman says:

    As a specific history of any one of Hunt s interests, this book does not serve Otherspecific histories of Soccer in the US, the AFC, the spread of Tennis, or the dynasty of the Hunts and other oil fortunes in America are all available But this is clearly not the aim of this book Lamar Hunt was a man who could have, and perhaps should have, been a squandering wastrel gifted with obnoxious wealth Instead, he was a quietly determined and graceful man who showed through his life and the li As a specific history of any one of Hunt s interests, this book does not serve Otherspecific histories of Soccer in the US, the AFC, the spread of Tennis, or the dynasty of the Hunts and other oil fortunes in America are all available But this is clearly not the aim of this book Lamar Hunt was a man who could have, and perhaps should have, been a squandering wastrel gifted with obnoxious wealth Instead, he was a quietly determined and graceful man who showed through his life and the lives that he touched that, despite all privilege, decency and hardwork will leave the world better than you found it

  7. Dan Ward Dan Ward says:

    If this book could have lightly mentioned Tennis and Soccer and focusedon football it would have been infinitelyinteresting I ended up skipping over the Tennis and Soccer sections It seems like Mr Hunt was a very decent man that everyone liked Unfortunately for the Chiefs it also seems that his ventures in others sports as well as the legal issues he encountered directly affected the quality of the football team It was very interesting to read about the AFL creation and eventual If this book could have lightly mentioned Tennis and Soccer and focusedon football it would have been infinitelyinteresting I ended up skipping over the Tennis and Soccer sections It seems like Mr Hunt was a very decent man that everyone liked Unfortunately for the Chiefs it also seems that his ventures in others sports as well as the legal issues he encountered directly affected the quality of the football team It was very interesting to read about the AFL creation and eventual merger and Hunts role therein If you are a football fan this book is worth the read

  8. Garrick Infanger Garrick Infanger says:

    The book was only three stars, but Lamar Hunt was worth five What an innovative and humble giant in the world of sports The book is unfortunately a typical year by year look at his life with painful details of individual games and summer road trips I enjoyed it immensely, but I don t know anyone else on earth with my interest in the business of sports.

  9. Paul Carr Paul Carr says:

    Excellent portrait of maybe the most influential man in U.S sports history Recommended.

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