Phoenix: Orange & Stuart 1641-1672 PDF Ï Orange

Phoenix: Orange & Stuart 1641-1672 PDF Ï Orange

Phoenix: Orange & Stuart 1641-1672 [Reading] ➿ Phoenix: Orange & Stuart 1641-1672 Author Pieter Geyl – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Regarded by many including Simon Schama as Pieter Geyl s finest work, this enthralling study describes the struggle between the House of Orange and the Regents of Holland in the mid seventeenth centur & Stuart MOBI î Regarded by many including Simon Schama as Pieter Geyl s finest work, this enthralling study describes the struggle between the House of Orange and the Regents of Holland in the mid seventeenth century In light of the links with the English House of Stuart, he views the dynastic marriage of William II and Mary as the root of future conflicts An absorbing tale of intrigue and ambition.


About the Author: Pieter Geyl

& Stuart MOBI î Dutch historian and Historiographer His main focus was Dutch history and the birth of the Dutch as a nation Geyl also was one of the first promoters of the Greater Netherlands idea, which goal is a unification of the Netherlands and Flanders in one countryDuring the second world war he was forbidden to publish and was interned for a couple of years.



10 thoughts on “Phoenix: Orange & Stuart 1641-1672

  1. Paul Lawrence Paul Lawrence says:

    I came across this book last week in a second hand bookshop It tells the story of the period 1641 1672 from the point of view of the Dutch republic As such it provides the reader with a very different perspective from that gained by reading books that focus on Charles II It presents the picture of a truly devious monarch though nodevious than his counterparts in other states acting at all times solely in his own interests in the most duplicitous fashion The Dutch republic itself was I came across this book last week in a second hand bookshop It tells the story of the period 1641 1672 from the point of view of the Dutch republic As such it provides the reader with a very different perspective from that gained by reading books that focus on Charles II It presents the picture of a truly devious monarch though nodevious than his counterparts in other states acting at all times solely in his own interests in the most duplicitous fashion The Dutch republic itself was just as fractured as the English state, with the House of Orange finding itself at constant odds with the States of Holland, with both sides warring an ongoing political campaign to persuade the various regents and stadtholders to their point of view Frederick Henry was the ruling Stadtholder in 1641, who envied his neighbouring monarchs their status and prestige So he succeeded in marrying his son to the daugther of Charles I, hoping to gain from an alliance with the English court, and increase his own standing at home.Not long after, of course, Charles I was executed and his family exiled, leaving the States of Orange to lend Charles II and his court a vast amount of money which they never repaid By aligning themselves with the royal family, they isolated themselves from the States of Holland, who were rightly suspicuous of their intent.The book details the political shennanigans that thus followed, the intrigue, plotting and double dealing between the different factions at home, with King Charles II, Cromwell and his Republican government, the French, the Spanish, the Danish, Swedes and Germans Spies wormed their way into every facet of political life, and affairs became so confusing that some countries found themselves pursuing directly opposing agendas at the same point in time.Fascinating tale, well narrated


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10 thoughts on “Phoenix: Orange & Stuart 1641-1672

  1. Paul Lawrence Paul Lawrence says:

    I came across this book last week in a second hand bookshop It tells the story of the period 1641 1672 from the point of view of the Dutch republic As such it provides the reader with a very different perspective from that gained by reading books that focus on Charles II It presents the picture of a truly devious monarch though nodevious than his counterparts in other states acting at all times solely in his own interests in the most duplicitous fashion The Dutch republic itself was I came across this book last week in a second hand bookshop It tells the story of the period 1641 1672 from the point of view of the Dutch republic As such it provides the reader with a very different perspective from that gained by reading books that focus on Charles II It presents the picture of a truly devious monarch though nodevious than his counterparts in other states acting at all times solely in his own interests in the most duplicitous fashion The Dutch republic itself was just as fractured as the English state, with the House of Orange finding itself at constant odds with the States of Holland, with both sides warring an ongoing political campaign to persuade the various regents and stadtholders to their point of view Frederick Henry was the ruling Stadtholder in 1641, who envied his neighbouring monarchs their status and prestige So he succeeded in marrying his son to the daugther of Charles I, hoping to gain from an alliance with the English court, and increase his own standing at home.Not long after, of course, Charles I was executed and his family exiled, leaving the States of Orange to lend Charles II and his court a vast amount of money which they never repaid By aligning themselves with the royal family, they isolated themselves from the States of Holland, who were rightly suspicuous of their intent.The book details the political shennanigans that thus followed, the intrigue, plotting and double dealing between the different factions at home, with King Charles II, Cromwell and his Republican government, the French, the Spanish, the Danish, Swedes and Germans Spies wormed their way into every facet of political life, and affairs became so confusing that some countries found themselves pursuing directly opposing agendas at the same point in time.Fascinating tale, well narrated

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