Tutti i racconti ePUB Ð Tutti i Kindle -

Tutti i racconti ePUB Ð Tutti i Kindle -


Tutti i racconti ❮Download❯ ➺ Tutti i racconti ✤ Author Nikolai Gogol – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Dalle immagini romantiche del folclore popolare ucraino de Le veglie ad una fattoria presso Dikan'ka agli eventi spesso minuti e insignificanti di Mirgorod spunto per orchestrazioni narrative in cui s Dalle immagini romantiche del folclore popolare ucraino de Le veglie ad una fattoria presso Dikan'ka agli eventi spesso minuti e insignificanti di Mirgorod spunto per orchestrazioni narrative in cui si esplorano attentamente tutte le dinamiche della rappresentazione; dai magici Arabeschi in cui l'arte gogoliana raggiunge vertici altissimi spostandosi disinvoltamente dalla creazione fantastica agli spaccati di vita pietroburghese Tutti i Kindle - al grottesco che caratterizza storie come Il cappotto e Il naso i racconti di Gogol' rappresentano i molteplici aspetti e livelli di una straordinaria ispirazione E ci offrono tutte le rifinite sfumature della sua immaginazione comica gli esiti imprevedibili di una smisurata fantasia figurativa il senso profondo della sua visione surrealista del mondo i complessi e articolati percorsi psicologici un universo vario e multiforme di personaggi gretti e meschini protagonisti di vicende al limite del nonsenso narrate con uno stile straordinariamente originale e moderno Premessa di Filippo La Porta.

  • Paperback
  • 512 pages
  • Tutti i racconti
  • Nikolai Gogol
  • Italian
  • 13 February 2016
  • 9788854134454

About the Author: Nikolai Gogol

Николай ГогольNikolai Gogol born in Sorochyntsi Poltava Governorate Russian Empire present day Ukraine Russian writer of Ukrainian descent Gogol's mother was a descendant of Polish nobility Gogol's father Vasyl Hohol Yanovsky a Ukrainian writer best known for his plays died when Gogol was years old In Gogol went to a school of higher art in Tutti i Kindle - Nizhyn and remained there until It was there that he began writing Very early he developed a dark and secretive disposition marked by a painful self consciousness and boundless ambition Eually early he developed an extraordinary talent for mimicry which later on made him a matchless reader of his own worksIn on leaving school Gogol came to Petersburg He had hoped for literary fame and brought with him a Romantic poem of German idyllic life – Ganz Küchelgarten He had it published at his own expense under the name of V Alov The magazines he sent it to almost universally derided it He bought all the copies and destroyed them swearing never to write poetry againGogol was one of the first masters of the short story alongside Alexander Pushkin Prosper Mérimée E T A Hoffmann and Nathaniel Hawthorne He was in touch with the literary aristocracy and was taken up by Vasily Zhukovsky and Pyotr Pletnyov and in was introduced to PushkinIn he brought out the first volume of his Ukrainian stories Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka which met with immediate success He followed it in with a second volume and in by two volumes of stories entitled Mirgorod as well as by two volumes of miscellaneous prose entitled Arabesues At this time Gogol developed a passion for Ukrainian history and tried to obtain an appointment to the history department at Kiev University His fictional story Taras Bulba based on the history of Ukrainian cossacks was the result of this phase in his interests Between and Gogol worked with great energy though almost all his work has in one way or another its sources in his four years of contact with Pushkin Only after the presentation on April of his comedy The Government Inspector Revizor that he finally came to believe in his literary vocationFrom to he lived abroad travelling throughout Germany and Switzerland as well as spending the winter of – in ParisPushkin's death produced a strong impression on Gogol His principal work during years following Pushkin's death was the satirical epic Dead Souls Concurrently he worked at other tasks – recast Taras Bulba and The Portrait completed his second comedy Marriage Zhenitba wrote the fragment Rome and his most famous short story The OvercoatAfter the triumph of Dead Souls Gogol came to be regarded as a great satirist who lampooned the unseemly sides of Imperial Russia However Dead Souls was but the first part of a counterpart to The Divine Comedy The first part represented the Inferno; the second part was to depict the gradual purification and transformation of the rogue Chichikov under the influence of virtuous publicans and governors – PurgatoryHis last years were spent in restless movement throughout the country He intensified his relationship with a church elder Matvey Konstantinovsky He seems to have strengthened in Gogol the fear of perdition by insisting on the sinfulness of all his imaginative work His health was undermined by exaggerated ascetic practices and he fell into a state of deep depression On the night of February he burned some of his manuscripts which contained most of the second part of Dead Souls He explained this as a mistake a practical joke played on him by the Devil Soon thereafter he took to bed refused all food and died in great pain nine days later For goodread's profile in Russian see.



10 thoughts on “Tutti i racconti

  1. Garima Garima says:

    We all came from Gogol's overcoatFyodor DostoevskyDuring my childhood like many other kids I was also in the habit of listening to bedtime stories They were usually told by my father or my grandmother My granny stuck to stories she knew already either related to her life in her village or some anecdotes related to Hindu Mythology where there is no dearth of tales My father however had to come up with a new story every time in an on the spot manner These stories used to be sweet simple at times illogical but enjoyable nevertheless The topics used to vary but the purpose was the same to put me to sleep with sweet thoughts in my head to carry forward to the dream world These are the luxuries one enjoys being a child but soon our dependence on such stories fades away and inadvertently we start finding solace in a complicated network of words to excite us Lately I’ve been reading some twisted literature and enjoy it too but thanks to Italo Calvino I also became particularly inclined to short stories and started looking for some good collection by other writers and thereupon came across Nikolai Gogol Initially his simple introduction that I encountered was Russian writer who introduced realism to Russian literature 1809 1852Later after reading few of his stories I searched a little and found this extended introduction Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol was a Ukrainian born Russian dramatist novelist and short story writerConsidered by his contemporaries’ one of the preeminent figures of the natural school of Russian literary realism later critics have found in Gogol's work a fundamentally romantic sensibility with strains of Surrealism and the grotesueBut to be honest I just don’t want to objectify him with any of that literary jargon For me he is just a story teller who knew his gift very well and wanted his readers to enjoy his beautifully crafted tales with that child like excitement and curiosity For most of the time I felt like being present at this imaginary set up consisting of a full moon night with bonfire burning in the middle of a beautiful meadow in a nice country place and a wise old village patriarch is reciting stories that his old eyes had long witnessed in his wondrous life The only difference is that those stories are not for childrenThis bizarre collection has generous use of outlandish and idiosyncratic elements conveying dark humor in its highest form making each single story worth reading and re reading Though of course there are some which are better than others namely The Nose The Overcoat and The Diary of a Madman which are mainly in the same league of brilliance covering themes such as alienation in society and status class anxiety imbued with ruthless satire These stories are heavily based on nonsensical musings and that’s the very thing that would strike a chord with its readers ie enjoying the supposed nonsense and making out logical interpretations of the same Some sources have revealed baffling implications of certain props Gogol applied to his works He definitely had a fixation with human Nose which features in most of these stories view spoiler As suggested by wiki “The critic Yermakov offers a Freudian interpretation of Gogol's fixation on noses as a form of castration anxiety Yermakov contends that Kovalev's missing part in The Nose represents his fragile masculinity In The Diary of a Madman Poprishchin discusses how noses live on the moon and says And when I pictured how the earth is a heavy substance and in sitting down may grind our noses into flour I was overcome with such anxiety I hurried to the state council chamber to order the police not to allow the earth to sit on the moon Many of the nonsensical comments reveal his repressed castration anxiety as he constantly worries how forces outside of his control could emasculate him Another notable example occurs while he is being tortured by the grand inuisitor when he randomly interjects However all this has been rewarded by my present discovery I've learned that every rooster has his Spain that it's located under his feathers In this passage he euates the country of Spain to a rooster's genitalia obscured by his feathers This bizarre comment offers revealing insight into Poprishchin's Spanish fantasy as an attempt to protect his fading masculinity and sexual virility hide spoiler

  2. Bill Kerwin Bill Kerwin says:

    To those interested in the short fiction of Gogol I couldn’t recommend a better collection All the masterpieces are here the selection is representative the translation is vigorous and the introduction is informative and helpfulOf course the masterpieces of the St Petersburg period are here “The Nose” “The Diary of a Madman “Nevsky Prospect” “The Overcoat” Gogol’s macabre and satiric depictions of humiliation and madness among the bureaucrats of Russia’s capital city but the masterpieces of Gogol’s Ukrainian period are here also “St John’s Eve” “The Night Before Christmas” “The Terrible Vengeance” “Viy” those exuberantly improvisational riffs on folklore themes filled with witches wizards and exorcisms plus a czarina’s slippers a flight on the back of a devil and a monster whose eyelids stretch all the way down to its feet The St Petersburg tale’s are well known but the Ukrainian tales are an eually valid—and vivid and high spirited—expression of Gogol’s geniusI am however happy to see that some of the lesser tales—fine stories only lesser when compared with Gogol’s best—are here too giving the reader a balanced and representative sampling of the author’s work From the Ukraine we have the mundane accounts of Ukrainian small town and country life “Ivan Fyodorovich Shponka and His Aunt” “Old World Landowners” “The Story of How Ivan Ivanovich uarreled with Ivan Nikiforovich” which show us a somewhat sunnier side of Gogol and from St Petersburg we have two memorable tales “The Carriage” and the “Portrait” the first slightly marred by an abrupt ending the second by an excess of moral seriousnessThe translation is by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky the husband and wife team best known for their translations of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy As is usual with their collaborations this translations seeks a perfect balance between faithfulness to the original Russian idioms and a natural flowing English style And is usual with their translations they often find itPevear himself wrote the introduction to this volume and it is a helpful for he understands Gogol’s contradictory nature an improvisational genius entranced both by the marvelous and the realistic yet haunted by the fear that he had failed to achieve what was for him a sacred task Gogol was made uneasy by his works They detached themselves from him and lived on their own producing effects that he had not foreseen and that sometimes dismayed him He would write commentaries after the fact trying to reduce them to commonplace and acceptable dimensions But their initial freedom stayed with them It was inherent in his method of composition and in his astonishing artistic gift—astonishing first of all to himself

  3. Warwick Warwick says:

    Do you remember that bit in Through the Looking glass where the Red ueen turns into a sheep?‘Oh much better’ cried the ueen her voice rising into a sueak as she went on ‘Much be etter Be etter Be e e etter Be e ehh’ The last word ended in a long bleat so like a sheep that Alice uite startedShe looked at the ueen who seemed to have suddenly wrapped herself up in wool Alice rubbed her eyes and looked again She couldn't make out what had happened at all Was she in a shop? And was that really – was it really a sheep that was sitting on the other side of the counter?When I was a kid I was obsessed by this passage That a writer should ‘make things up’ was something I accepted instinctively – nothing could be natural than to invent incidents people even whole species for a story But that the basic preconditions of reality – the laws of physics the relationship between senses and experience – that these could be simply ignored or blended at will – that a ueen could become a sheep mid sentence with no explanation considered necessarythat just blew my mindI reread this little section endlessly amazed by how I would fall for the sleight of hand even while aware of it And that nonsensical line of speech Be etter Be e e etter Be e ehh is silly as this sounds one of the most talismanic in all literature for me It represents something fiction can do that cannot be done by any other medium    A Terrible RevengeCarroll had the device down perfectly and I reckon that's why the Alice books despite being written for children have such a hold over literary history It is easy to see that a ueen becoming a sheep in 1871 is not far away from a salesman waking up as a giant insect forty four years later Reading Gogol's ‘The Nose’ Нос was therefore a bit of a join the dots moment for me because here we have the literary ancestor of all such techniues I especially loved that exuisite moment where our noseless narrator first glimpses a familiar figure in the streets of PetersburgSomething inexplicable took place before his eyes a carriage was stopping at the entrance the carriage door flew open; a gentleman in uniform bending down sprang out and ran up the steps What was the horror and at the same time amazement of Kovalyov when he recognised that this was his own nose At this extraordinary spectacle it seemed to him that everything was heaving before his eyes; he felt that he could scarcely stand; but he made up his mind come what may to await the gentleman's return to the carriage and he stood trembling all over as though in fever Two minutes later the nose actually did come out He was in a gold laced uniform with a big stand up collar; he had on chamois leather breeches at his side was a sword From his plumed hat it might be gathered that he was of the rank of a civil councillor Everything showed that he was going somewhere to pay a visit He looked to both sides called to the coachman to open the carriage door got in and drove offWhat makes this so wonderful is the matter of fact prose Kovalyov may be astonished but the narrator is not In the unlikely event that such a scene would even occur to any other writer it's very easy to see that in less skilful hands paragraphs of description might be dedicated to convincing you of how a two inch nose can have become a six foot personage capable of wearing clothes and of moving of its own accord Gogol makes no attempt whatever to convince to persuade He just relates the impossibleFor him clearly this epistemological malleability is something that has been inherited from folktales The earliest stories in this collection are basically Ukrainian folk stories and I found them mostly tiresome and overblown Only later when you get to the good stuff do the earlier stories become interesting in retrospect because you can see where a lot of his techniues originated    St John's EveThe unrestrained demonic hijinks of his earlier stories are gradually brought under control and funnelled into specific themes and ideas – as in ‘The Portrait’ Портрет for instance where a strong element of supernaturalism is used as a means to comment on artistic integrity Even in the straighter stories though an underlying uncertainty bubbles up into a sense of genuine weirdness especially in the later works – there's an almost Nervalian unhinged uality that manifests itself in odd little unexplained narrative devices There is certainly something eerily convincing about ‘A Madman's Diary’ Записки сумасшедшего with its progressively insane dating system ‘I don't remember the date’ one entry is headed ‘There was no month either’    The Nevsky ProspectThis collection culminates in the very influential ‘The Overcoat’ Шинель a story that oozes with proto Freudianism and that seems despite its comic philosophical flourishes to be papering over some underlying terror Neverthless ‘The Nose’ remains my favourite piece It is just so odd so resistant to any satisfactory interpretation and the idea that it might just be intended at face value is almost frightening ‘What is utterly nonsensical’ Gogol asserts with appealing simplicity ‘happens in this world̀’This particular edition from the Folio Society comes with eleven beautiful iconographic illustrations from Peter Suart a few of which are scattered above They complement Gogol's brand of formal weirdness perfectly

  4. MJ Nicholls MJ Nicholls says:

    First this is not The Complete Tales The unlearned distinction between Collected Complete has angered completists the world over Collected means incomplete a mixtape of works that constitute critically the best this writer has to offer Complete means the totted up totality depending upon what is being completed ie Complete Works is ambiguous and open to omissions depending on what is classed as a work—prose? plays? Just assume a fuller completion when it’s Complete not Collected Except in those rare moments when Collected means Complete In the case of Gogol Yale U Press have the one Complete Tales in print in two volumes incorrectly lumped with the Collected Tales eds This beautiful Everyman’s hardcover edition and presumably the paperback euivs omit a slab of material from Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka which only exists as an old Oxford paperback conflated with Mirgorod stories suggesting the work is so lacklustre it doesn’t bear reprinting For the sake of tedious exactitude this edition omits all the story fragments and from Evenings The Fair at Sorochintsï May Night or the Drowned Maiden The Lost Letter A Bewitched Place From Mirgorod Taras Bulba is omitted available as a separate book from the Modern Library These tales presumably are found in Yale’s Complete Tales The tales in this Collected Tales perform the Gogol mixtape function perfectly from the rambling horror of Viy and The Night Before Christmas to the hilarious sinister satire of The Nose and The Overcoat Not all the tales spark and sizzle like the slight St John’s Eve and Old World Landowners but the best of these the bestest are at their bestestest some of the premier examples of the Russian short story chilling and macabre thigh splitting and mad

  5. Margitte Margitte says:

    Russian literature so full of enigmas contains no greater creative mystery than Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol31 March 1809 – 4 March 1852 He has done for the Russian novel and Russian prose what Pushkin has done for Russian poetry Before these two men came Russian literature can hardly have been said to exist It was pompous in effect with pseudo classism with strong foreign influences In the speech of the upper circles there was an over fondness for German French and English words Between them the two friends by the force of their great genius cleared away the debris which made for sterility and erected in their stead a nude structure out of living Russian words The spoken word borne of the people gave soul and wings to literature Only by coming to earth the native earth was it enabled to sourComing up from little Russia the Ukraine with cossack blood in his vains Gogol injected his own healthy virus into a body blew his own virile spirit the spirit of his race into its nostrils and gave the Russian novelist direction to this very dayI think the introduction above which is used by a multitude of website including describes Gogol's work and person the best I read this collection of tales throughout 2019 and really enjoyed the 'other worldliness' of them all Once again Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky translated and annotated this volume splendidly They made the reading of The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov a good experience too With the footnotes and annotations added to their work they just make a much bigger literary adventure possible for so many readers Therefore it was a delight to find this work from them as wellThis collection includesUkrainian Tales St John's Eve; The Night Before Christmas; The Teriible Vengeance; Ivan Fyodorovich Sphonka and His Aunt; Old World Landowners; Viy; The Story of How Ivan Ivanovich uarreled with Ivan Nikiforvich;Petersburg Tales Nevsky Prospect; The Dairy of a Madman; The Nose; The Carriage; The Portrait; The OvercoatThere is a touch of modern authors such as Garrison Keillor and Richard Russo to these old world tales Nikolai Gogol was a raconteur par excellence in my view anyway Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol31 March 1809 – 4 March 1852 was a Russian dramatist of Ukrainian originAlthough Gogol was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the preeminent figures of the natural school of Russian literary realism later critics have found in his work a fundamentally romantic sensibility with strains of surrealism and the grotesue The Nose Viy The Overcoat Nevsky Prospekt His early works such as Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka were influenced by his Ukrainian upbringing Ukrainian culture and folklore His later writing satirised political corruption in the Russian Empire The Government Inspector Dead Souls The novel Taras Bulba 1835 and the play Marriage 1842 along with the short stories Diary of a Madman The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich uarreled with Ivan Nikiforovich The Portrait and The Carriage are also among his best known works Nevertheless subseuent generations of radical critics celebrated Gogol the author in whose world a nose roams the streets of the Russian capital as a great realist a reputation decried by the Encyclopedia Britannica as the triumph of Gogolesue ironyThe leading novelists of the period – notably Yevgeny Zamyatin and Mikhail Bulgakov – also admired Gogol and followed in his footsteps Source Wikipedia Well this was just the formal introduction to the experience your might enjoy when deciding to read Nikolai Gogol I found the stories so rich in atmosphere detail and pathos Romantic a little bit of romantic escapism yet very often satirical with a touch of nostalgia for his homeland His pessimism of life came through as well There was a fine balance between the elements he so effortlessly incorporated into his work He described his childhood farm and the surroundings so vividly the landscapes peasants boisterous village lads the folklore populated with witches devils demonic figures and fantasy In between he threw in realistic incidencespolitical criticism et al of the times they were living in It was like looking at an old Russian painting and without warning being swept into it One can hardly draw a comparison between Gogol and Franz Kafka There is no comparison as far as clarity of thought and intent is concerned Gogol was passionate about life itself He loved writing He loved the intrigue of living Franz Kafka was a troubled tragic soul But brilliant at it in his own right I'm just mentioning this in case someone considers reading Gogol which I highly recommend His work is light yet dark; playful yet serious; raw; unpretentious; from the soul His work is brilliant So many authors such as Kafka Dostoevsky Yevgeny Zamyatin and Mikhail Bulgakov would later borrow from his brilliance and keep his memory alive In fact years later Fyodor Dostoyevsky was to exclaim that all Russian realists had come “from under Gogol’s greatcoat”I strongly recommend this article Writing the Russian Reader into the text Gogol Turgenev and their Audiences Some uotes from his work just to wet your appetite Goodreads uotes of Nikolai Gogol's works I made so many notes that this review will turn into a book if I keep at it lolol So I will refrain I can only accomplish that by sitting on my hands OyForgive me but here is a few There was a church in the hamlet of St Panteleimon if I remember rightly A priest lived by it then Father Afanasy of blessed memory Noticing that Basavriuk did not come to church even on Easter Sunday he decided to reprimand him and put him under a church penance Penance hah He barely escaped “Listen my good sir” the man thundered in reply “you’d better mind your own business and not go meddling in other people’s unless you’d like to have that goat’s gullet of yours plugged with hot kutya” What could be done with the cursed fellow? Father Afanasy merely announced that anyone who kept company with Basavriuk would be regarded as a Catholic an enemy of Christ’s Church and of the whole human race from St John's Eve it’s easier for a woman to kiss the devil meaning no offense than to call another woman a beauty from St John's Eve “If you ever show up in my cottage again or even just under the windows then listen Pyotr by God that’ll be the end of your black moustache and your topknot as well; here it is going twice around your ear but it’ll bid farewell to your head or I’m not Terenty Korzh”from St John's Eve He kept looking to see if the tree’s shadow was getting longer if the setting sun was getting redder—and the impatiently as it went on So drawn out God’s day must have lost its end somewhere from The Terrible Vengeance The river is not mutinous He grumbles and murmurs like an old man nothing pleases him; everything has changed around him; he is uietly at war with the hills forests and meadows on his banks and carries his complaint against them to the Black Seafrom The Terrible VengeanceThis collection was truly a highlight of 2019

  6. James James says:

    Nikolai Gogol based on the image results my Google search spat back reminds me of that uietly excited classmate who's usually game to tag along with you for some mischief making Whoopee cushions and joy buzzers presumably hadn't been around then so one shudders at the tricks his imagination must've improvised From his eyes shines a look too knowing not to have exposed his hastily planned cover ups and landed him in a few or hundred detentions spent here sweeping grounds and there copying lines In short my kinda guy Russian literature since books began making me feel things has been for me that scary mountain whose lack of obvious footholds has sent me running home into the suishier bosoms of easier genres whose peak is peopled with happy campers roasting marshmallows while animatedly discussing scenes from this Dostoevsky classic or that Tolstoy epic What sure hand would as soon as I attempt the climb save me from tripping over the first loose rock and snap my neck? Gogol's while mindful to point out where not to step wouldn't hold mine yet what convinced me to turn to his works first of all was learning of the ripples they caused that soon impacted on others' in waves We all came out of Gogol's 'Overcoat' some dude said which prisoner to that tedious no stones left unturned school of thought that I am rather finally shut the caseNo gripes to be had here about that to be on the same page as evident by how finding no of the book to savor left me so restless my withdrawal dissipated only when I spent half an hour the next day at the bookstore head deep inside The Inspector General a similar collection of another company included and along with several other shorts this one has omitted for crimes against humanity convenience Let's come back to the point the hype? It's real Where Gogol's praisers have stumbled is that they haven't been louder about it Each of the stories 13 in all and besides that lay scattered elsewhere springs from a mind able to hop between moods as simply as switching socks and impressively capture all that in writing that not so much reads as flows By no means mind does Gogol here achieve infallibility St John's Eve where the roller coaster rolls out of the station and The Terrible Vengeance get so twisty and turny I had to read the latter twice before heads and tails could be made of it The Carriage fangirled over to no end by Anton Chekhov fell short of my hopes which granted the preceding unbeatable trifecta kicking off the second half of the book set impossibly high The Overcoat too didn't much measure up to those same expectations People at least in the earlier parts are either regularly found with their arms akimbo or perennially vexed But for all that any misgivings don't matter so much the I think on them If they're not because my attention wandered they're a placement issue; if not that as well then nitpicks Where there are strike outs Gogol makes up for a hundredfold in home runsThe Night Before Christmas is hugely fun and entertaining the vibe throughout fit for a 90's Saturday morning cartoon albeit one soon headed for the chopping block on account of complaints from parents outraged at their bumpkins' being exposed to such degenerate content as a devil who had one last night to wander about the wide world and teach good people to sin Ivan Fyodorovich Shponka and His Aunt contains the strangest dream seuence that contrasted with the mundane goings on its characters face in the waking world not enough weed will ever exist to help make sense of it Old World Landowners even without witches and devils is still plenty captivating with two old couple developed masterfully taking center stage The second scariest short of the lot Viy proves books can take years off such scaredy cats as me as well as that closet scene The Ring have long sucker punched unsuspecting viewers with Wrapping up the first half of Gogol's colorful re imagining of his country's rural life is The uarrel which boasts of a higher laugh per page rate than any other short to date— Excuse me for appearing before you in my natural state says the corpulent main character called Ivanovich Nikiforovich after being barged in on by his friend neighbor and soon to be bitter rival St John's Eve either doesn't lack for bright spots and even those are soon outshone into white oblivion by a passage of just astounding imagery in The Terrible Vengeance that describes the Dnieper river to musical perfection Gogol's genius aimed at the then capital burns even hotter While not as inventively and unapologetically fantastic and outrageous as their Ukrainian predecessors the Petersburg Tales far from stumbling for their lack of broomstick riding witches moon stealing devils and the odd incest are likelier than the former to worm their way into the collective subconscious to there make a permanent home The devil representative in Gogol's wacky world of the ubiuitousness of bad influences whose seduction every day tempts us lurks even in the city but almost as an afterthought what need have we of the ultimate troublemaker when man himself can beat the master at his own game? In the majority of the shorts no puppet master hides behind purple curtains pulling levers and pushing buttons to nudge events his way The result is often spectacular Nevsky Prospect throws a knockout from the opening bell soaking us with ejaculations the narrator makes over what a great place Nevsky Prospect is and then magnifies the microscope over two acuaintances each different in their approaches chasing after two women spotted there Gogol at one point shows so powerfully what it is to fall in love that it would still be a effective form of communication than if telepathy were possible The Diary of a Madman as the title gives away takes us into the mind of an apparently healthy everyman whose mental deterioration should well satiate that morbidly curious class of gawkers by who gravitate towards car accident sites Dogs exchanging letters and talking politics aren't even the weirdest things here Next The Nose seems straightforward enough almost too straightforward someone finds someone else's nose inside his bread one morning and after his story's or less wrapped up we trail the said noseless man as he tries to locate it No other story however has ever so completely robbed me of my words myself prostrate with awe at Gogol's audacity as this one where he blindsides you with the last expectation you can think of It's a tough act no one wants to follow so The Carriage with its relatively normal happenings can be forgiven for not wowing some people The Portrait on the other hand picks things up and Gogol is back where he's comfortable keeping therapists in business by sending to their recliner chairs us traumatized readers The story separated into two parts details the rags to riches to ruin life of an artist called Chartkov whose painting skills are moderate and potential unmistakable who happens upon a mysterious portrait of a creepy old man His stare which Gogol's description gives major heft is worse to imagine than to watch the best horror has to offer cinema In a nutshell there's gold hidden behind the portrait's frame that Chartkov exploits to better his position in society and that in the end destroys him The second part delves fully into the portrait's origins and is no less mesmerizing Along the way Gogol touches on the artist's life and their creative process social manipulation and superficiality competition and obsolescence It's a meaty story with something for everyone and as with most of his works so far to relish anew with every reread The Overcoat the last in line continues the supernatural element The Portrait brought back but dominated by the down to earth routines of mediocre bullied outcast Akaky Akakievich it takes a backseat After his tatty overcoat a source of ridicule at work became useless as protection against the brutal Russian winter Akaky gets another made which gains him confidence and popularity His moment in the sun doesn't last though and from there does the story return to familiar grounds doom and gloom This second bookend may have suffered from the same positional problem The Carriage did the lesson here short story collections read from cover to cover are bound to favor some and hurt others but hindsight is its friend There's a matter of fact deadpan uality to the narration that gets funnier in retrospect A long suffering tone there also can't be missed when the writing takes great pains to explain how Akaky Akakievich came by that name the purpose of which section is obvious and hilarious when Wikipedia to the rescue you read later that it is the Russian euivalent of John Johnson as well as sounds like the Russian word obkakat or kaka meaning to smear with excrement that makes it read as Poop Poopson The idea that the likes of Dostoevsky wasn't above toilet humor warms these cockles greatly Then on the aforementioned Russian winter it's not generally that it's the enemy of poor people but that it's the enemy of people earning a salary of four hundred roubles or thereabouts The exactitude is killer Another An order was issued for the police to catch the dead man at all costs dead or alive Added to Gogol's in jokes and humor is a uestion that if given any consideration is an easy road to a panic attack what's your overcoat? Another character features in the story that goes by no other name than the important person and in answer he would probably bring up his rank which is as much smokes and mirrors as Akaky's overcoat is that masks their total ignorance about certain workings of the world The balance between such introspective moments and the satirical asides in this story and the others is if you ask me not a half bad explanation for why Gogol is ducking awesome

  7. J.M. Hushour J.M. Hushour says:

    Gogol wrote many fine short stories almost all of which I think are collected here Since I read the well known Petersburg tales recently I skipped those though the PV translations are always better The gems here are the stories subsumed under the Ukrainian Tales most of which deal with supernatural themes in my opinion Gogol's real forte St John's Eve and the Night Before Christmas deal with hellish visitation and torment Viy one of my favorites also check out the surreal film version from the 60s finds a young seminarian watching over a dead girl's corpseuntil she opens her eyes It's all downhill from there The other stories collected here are funny variations on Gogol's latter day themes one finds in Dead Souls the silliness of the provincial gentry and the general absurdity of society in general whether through social s litigation or fancy carriages

  8. Alex Alex says:

    My first reaction to Gogol was bewilderment It's funny and engaging to read butwhat the hell is it about? I'm not sure what the point of Diary of a Madman is although I know I enjoyed itPevear and Volokhonsky's intro is helpful although it contains a number of minor spoilers Their point is that if you try to understand Gogol you are failing Gogol himself didn't understand Gogol We still do not know what Gogol is says some guy they uoted PV write that Gogol as compared to traditional storytellers has nothing in mind Memory plays no part in his work He does not know where the act of writing will lead himPushkin an early and ardent supporter wrote Here is real gaiety honest unconstrained without mincing without primness And in places what poetry What sensitivity All this is so unusual in our present day literature that I still haven't recovered And that seems fair to me It's still unusual now although at least we have Borges; maybe we should shut up about what it means and just have a good time with it2017 11 17 Diary of a MadmanThe madman is a clerk and right away hears two dogs chatting One belongs to the directir's hot daughter Never mind never mind Silence The dogs are corresponding by letter; he steals the letters to find out about the daughter Meanwhile Spain is in turmoil the throne is vacant It cannot be he says that there was no king A state cannot be without a king There is a king only he's somewhere unknown luckily our clerk realizes that he is actually indeed the king of Spain Around this time the dates on his diary entries start getting royal from Dec 8 to the 86th of Martober to date none The day had no date He is eventually returned to Spain which bears a passing resemblance to an insane asylum where he is shaved and beaten and possibly murdered

  9. kaelan kaelan says:

    These tales and novellas are incredible I was already familiar with The Overcoat and The Nose both of which exude a certain bureaucratic Bartleby ish vibe But what especially impressed me this time around were the earlier Ukrainian Tales such as the poignant Old World Landowners and the indescribably disturbing Terrible Vengeance which combine folklore proto po mo narrative and surreal nightmare logic into something completely and utterly sui generisLess impressive in my view is the now ubiuitous Pevear Volokhonsky translation I'd enjoyed PV's version of The Brothers Karamazov – a novel largely consisting of dialogue and plot – but found their doggedly literal approach ill suited to such a vibrant prose stylist as Gogol In their hands Gogol's language often came across as stiff awkward and vaguely academic I had a similar problem with their translation of Bulgakov People say that Guerney's the one to get when it comes to Dead Souls but English language readers of the Tales may just need to buckle down and learn some RussianA highly rewarding read nonetheless

  10. Jean-marcel Jean-marcel says:

    This anthology is so achingly good that I read it slowly over a period of abouta year and when I was through I was extremely sad that there weren't any tales for me to come to afresh But I can still re read these many a time and always gain once again that feeling of a glorious unfettered sort of artistic madness that teeters on so many precipices but never falls nor falters Here we have wild humour sincere and touching expressions of humanity carousing feasting absurdity and threatening darkness touched with a hint of irreverent levity even at the worst of timesI love the Ukrainian tales with their lyrical style and descriptions of tiny hamlets and provincial revelry But these are not cozy tales; in fact there is a real grimness leaning over your shoulder in many of these Viy utterly surprised and thrilled me with its depiction of the macabre and the horrific especially as I didn't imagine at the time any writers in Gogol's time addressing the supernatural with such plain open language and without a hint of repentence or avoidance of the bloody details Viy even became the basis for Mario Bava's classic film Black Sunday one of the ultimate gothic revenge movies but believe it or not the Gogol story is even darker It's also kind of funny though especially with all of Gogol's descriptions of the young priest and his fruitless efforts to get away from the village so he wouldn't have to perform an exorcism Then there's A Terrible Vengeance which is probably the dreariest grimmest thing in this anthology and makes you feel bitter toward everything But Gogol seems to be saying you need this You simply must be remindedI notice a certain sad wistfulness in the Petersburg tales I get the feeling that Gogol while kind of set afire by the cosmopolitan glories of Petersburg missed his homeland terribly Of course I could be misapprehending here but the character of the stories in the second half of the anthology is differentthe pain introspective the appeals to human nature touched by genuine sad experience I was particularly moved by Nevsky Prospekt which is a story so modern in its apprehensions and depictions of urban life that its uite startling and eye opening I wonder if Dickens ever read Gogol?The style of Gogol whether told and these stories really do all feel as though they were told and not written in Petersburg or Kiev and the surrounding villages is steady and assured throughout the book And lest you think that in Petersburg Gogol gave up his provincialism and love of the fantastic and strange think againall this stuff is very much still alive in the big city There's nothing that Gogol can see that can't at some point be touched by the supernatural and eerie This is in fact one of the things that I love most about him He tells his stories as though they were folk knowledge but the introduction in this book stresses that in fact they weren't and that he really made most of this stuff up himself I've a feeling he would have been a strange compelling man to meet The translation by Pevear and Belakhovsky is excellent and although I don't know Russian I always look for their translations of Russian classics because they feel very genuine somehow very natural and alive with their attempt to communicate the lyrical power of the writers whose work they bring to the english speaking world

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10 thoughts on “Tutti i racconti

  1. Garima Garima says:

    We all came from Gogol's overcoatFyodor DostoevskyDuring my childhood like many other kids I was also in the habit of listening to bedtime stories They were usually told by my father or my grandmother My granny stuck to stories she knew already either related to her life in her village or some anecdotes related to Hindu Mythology where there is no dearth of tales My father however had to come up with a new story every time in an on the spot manner These stories used to be sweet simple at times illogical but enjoyable nevertheless The topics used to vary but the purpose was the same to put me to sleep with sweet thoughts in my head to carry forward to the dream world These are the luxuries one enjoys being a child but soon our dependence on such stories fades away and inadvertently we start finding solace in a complicated network of words to excite us Lately I’ve been reading some twisted literature and enjoy it too but thanks to Italo Calvino I also became particularly inclined to short stories and started looking for some good collection by other writers and thereupon came across Nikolai Gogol Initially his simple introduction that I encountered was Russian writer who introduced realism to Russian literature 1809 1852Later after reading few of his stories I searched a little and found this extended introduction Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol was a Ukrainian born Russian dramatist novelist and short story writerConsidered by his contemporaries’ one of the preeminent figures of the natural school of Russian literary realism later critics have found in Gogol's work a fundamentally romantic sensibility with strains of Surrealism and the grotesueBut to be honest I just don’t want to objectify him with any of that literary jargon For me he is just a story teller who knew his gift very well and wanted his readers to enjoy his beautifully crafted tales with that child like excitement and curiosity For most of the time I felt like being present at this imaginary set up consisting of a full moon night with bonfire burning in the middle of a beautiful meadow in a nice country place and a wise old village patriarch is reciting stories that his old eyes had long witnessed in his wondrous life The only difference is that those stories are not for childrenThis bizarre collection has generous use of outlandish and idiosyncratic elements conveying dark humor in its highest form making each single story worth reading and re reading Though of course there are some which are better than others namely The Nose The Overcoat and The Diary of a Madman which are mainly in the same league of brilliance covering themes such as alienation in society and status class anxiety imbued with ruthless satire These stories are heavily based on nonsensical musings and that’s the very thing that would strike a chord with its readers ie enjoying the supposed nonsense and making out logical interpretations of the same Some sources have revealed baffling implications of certain props Gogol applied to his works He definitely had a fixation with human Nose which features in most of these stories view spoiler As suggested by wiki “The critic Yermakov offers a Freudian interpretation of Gogol's fixation on noses as a form of castration anxiety Yermakov contends that Kovalev's missing part in The Nose represents his fragile masculinity In The Diary of a Madman Poprishchin discusses how noses live on the moon and says And when I pictured how the earth is a heavy substance and in sitting down may grind our noses into flour I was overcome with such anxiety I hurried to the state council chamber to order the police not to allow the earth to sit on the moon Many of the nonsensical comments reveal his repressed castration anxiety as he constantly worries how forces outside of his control could emasculate him Another notable example occurs while he is being tortured by the grand inuisitor when he randomly interjects However all this has been rewarded by my present discovery I've learned that every rooster has his Spain that it's located under his feathers In this passage he euates the country of Spain to a rooster's genitalia obscured by his feathers This bizarre comment offers revealing insight into Poprishchin's Spanish fantasy as an attempt to protect his fading masculinity and sexual virility hide spoiler

  2. Bill Kerwin Bill Kerwin says:

    To those interested in the short fiction of Gogol I couldn’t recommend a better collection All the masterpieces are here the selection is representative the translation is vigorous and the introduction is informative and helpfulOf course the masterpieces of the St Petersburg period are here “The Nose” “The Diary of a Madman “Nevsky Prospect” “The Overcoat” Gogol’s macabre and satiric depictions of humiliation and madness among the bureaucrats of Russia’s capital city but the masterpieces of Gogol’s Ukrainian period are here also “St John’s Eve” “The Night Before Christmas” “The Terrible Vengeance” “Viy” those exuberantly improvisational riffs on folklore themes filled with witches wizards and exorcisms plus a czarina’s slippers a flight on the back of a devil and a monster whose eyelids stretch all the way down to its feet The St Petersburg tale’s are well known but the Ukrainian tales are an eually valid—and vivid and high spirited—expression of Gogol’s geniusI am however happy to see that some of the lesser tales—fine stories only lesser when compared with Gogol’s best—are here too giving the reader a balanced and representative sampling of the author’s work From the Ukraine we have the mundane accounts of Ukrainian small town and country life “Ivan Fyodorovich Shponka and His Aunt” “Old World Landowners” “The Story of How Ivan Ivanovich uarreled with Ivan Nikiforovich” which show us a somewhat sunnier side of Gogol and from St Petersburg we have two memorable tales “The Carriage” and the “Portrait” the first slightly marred by an abrupt ending the second by an excess of moral seriousnessThe translation is by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky the husband and wife team best known for their translations of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy As is usual with their collaborations this translations seeks a perfect balance between faithfulness to the original Russian idioms and a natural flowing English style And is usual with their translations they often find itPevear himself wrote the introduction to this volume and it is a helpful for he understands Gogol’s contradictory nature an improvisational genius entranced both by the marvelous and the realistic yet haunted by the fear that he had failed to achieve what was for him a sacred task Gogol was made uneasy by his works They detached themselves from him and lived on their own producing effects that he had not foreseen and that sometimes dismayed him He would write commentaries after the fact trying to reduce them to commonplace and acceptable dimensions But their initial freedom stayed with them It was inherent in his method of composition and in his astonishing artistic gift—astonishing first of all to himself

  3. Warwick Warwick says:

    Do you remember that bit in Through the Looking glass where the Red ueen turns into a sheep?‘Oh much better’ cried the ueen her voice rising into a sueak as she went on ‘Much be etter Be etter Be e e etter Be e ehh’ The last word ended in a long bleat so like a sheep that Alice uite startedShe looked at the ueen who seemed to have suddenly wrapped herself up in wool Alice rubbed her eyes and looked again She couldn't make out what had happened at all Was she in a shop? And was that really – was it really a sheep that was sitting on the other side of the counter?When I was a kid I was obsessed by this passage That a writer should ‘make things up’ was something I accepted instinctively – nothing could be natural than to invent incidents people even whole species for a story But that the basic preconditions of reality – the laws of physics the relationship between senses and experience – that these could be simply ignored or blended at will – that a ueen could become a sheep mid sentence with no explanation considered necessarythat just blew my mindI reread this little section endlessly amazed by how I would fall for the sleight of hand even while aware of it And that nonsensical line of speech Be etter Be e e etter Be e ehh is silly as this sounds one of the most talismanic in all literature for me It represents something fiction can do that cannot be done by any other medium    A Terrible RevengeCarroll had the device down perfectly and I reckon that's why the Alice books despite being written for children have such a hold over literary history It is easy to see that a ueen becoming a sheep in 1871 is not far away from a salesman waking up as a giant insect forty four years later Reading Gogol's ‘The Nose’ Нос was therefore a bit of a join the dots moment for me because here we have the literary ancestor of all such techniues I especially loved that exuisite moment where our noseless narrator first glimpses a familiar figure in the streets of PetersburgSomething inexplicable took place before his eyes a carriage was stopping at the entrance the carriage door flew open; a gentleman in uniform bending down sprang out and ran up the steps What was the horror and at the same time amazement of Kovalyov when he recognised that this was his own nose At this extraordinary spectacle it seemed to him that everything was heaving before his eyes; he felt that he could scarcely stand; but he made up his mind come what may to await the gentleman's return to the carriage and he stood trembling all over as though in fever Two minutes later the nose actually did come out He was in a gold laced uniform with a big stand up collar; he had on chamois leather breeches at his side was a sword From his plumed hat it might be gathered that he was of the rank of a civil councillor Everything showed that he was going somewhere to pay a visit He looked to both sides called to the coachman to open the carriage door got in and drove offWhat makes this so wonderful is the matter of fact prose Kovalyov may be astonished but the narrator is not In the unlikely event that such a scene would even occur to any other writer it's very easy to see that in less skilful hands paragraphs of description might be dedicated to convincing you of how a two inch nose can have become a six foot personage capable of wearing clothes and of moving of its own accord Gogol makes no attempt whatever to convince to persuade He just relates the impossibleFor him clearly this epistemological malleability is something that has been inherited from folktales The earliest stories in this collection are basically Ukrainian folk stories and I found them mostly tiresome and overblown Only later when you get to the good stuff do the earlier stories become interesting in retrospect because you can see where a lot of his techniues originated    St John's EveThe unrestrained demonic hijinks of his earlier stories are gradually brought under control and funnelled into specific themes and ideas – as in ‘The Portrait’ Портрет for instance where a strong element of supernaturalism is used as a means to comment on artistic integrity Even in the straighter stories though an underlying uncertainty bubbles up into a sense of genuine weirdness especially in the later works – there's an almost Nervalian unhinged uality that manifests itself in odd little unexplained narrative devices There is certainly something eerily convincing about ‘A Madman's Diary’ Записки сумасшедшего with its progressively insane dating system ‘I don't remember the date’ one entry is headed ‘There was no month either’    The Nevsky ProspectThis collection culminates in the very influential ‘The Overcoat’ Шинель a story that oozes with proto Freudianism and that seems despite its comic philosophical flourishes to be papering over some underlying terror Neverthless ‘The Nose’ remains my favourite piece It is just so odd so resistant to any satisfactory interpretation and the idea that it might just be intended at face value is almost frightening ‘What is utterly nonsensical’ Gogol asserts with appealing simplicity ‘happens in this world̀’This particular edition from the Folio Society comes with eleven beautiful iconographic illustrations from Peter Suart a few of which are scattered above They complement Gogol's brand of formal weirdness perfectly

  4. MJ Nicholls MJ Nicholls says:

    First this is not The Complete Tales The unlearned distinction between Collected Complete has angered completists the world over Collected means incomplete a mixtape of works that constitute critically the best this writer has to offer Complete means the totted up totality depending upon what is being completed ie Complete Works is ambiguous and open to omissions depending on what is classed as a work—prose? plays? Just assume a fuller completion when it’s Complete not Collected Except in those rare moments when Collected means Complete In the case of Gogol Yale U Press have the one Complete Tales in print in two volumes incorrectly lumped with the Collected Tales eds This beautiful Everyman’s hardcover edition and presumably the paperback euivs omit a slab of material from Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka which only exists as an old Oxford paperback conflated with Mirgorod stories suggesting the work is so lacklustre it doesn’t bear reprinting For the sake of tedious exactitude this edition omits all the story fragments and from Evenings The Fair at Sorochintsï May Night or the Drowned Maiden The Lost Letter A Bewitched Place From Mirgorod Taras Bulba is omitted available as a separate book from the Modern Library These tales presumably are found in Yale’s Complete Tales The tales in this Collected Tales perform the Gogol mixtape function perfectly from the rambling horror of Viy and The Night Before Christmas to the hilarious sinister satire of The Nose and The Overcoat Not all the tales spark and sizzle like the slight St John’s Eve and Old World Landowners but the best of these the bestest are at their bestestest some of the premier examples of the Russian short story chilling and macabre thigh splitting and mad

  5. Margitte Margitte says:

    Russian literature so full of enigmas contains no greater creative mystery than Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol31 March 1809 – 4 March 1852 He has done for the Russian novel and Russian prose what Pushkin has done for Russian poetry Before these two men came Russian literature can hardly have been said to exist It was pompous in effect with pseudo classism with strong foreign influences In the speech of the upper circles there was an over fondness for German French and English words Between them the two friends by the force of their great genius cleared away the debris which made for sterility and erected in their stead a nude structure out of living Russian words The spoken word borne of the people gave soul and wings to literature Only by coming to earth the native earth was it enabled to sourComing up from little Russia the Ukraine with cossack blood in his vains Gogol injected his own healthy virus into a body blew his own virile spirit the spirit of his race into its nostrils and gave the Russian novelist direction to this very dayI think the introduction above which is used by a multitude of website including describes Gogol's work and person the best I read this collection of tales throughout 2019 and really enjoyed the 'other worldliness' of them all Once again Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky translated and annotated this volume splendidly They made the reading of The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov a good experience too With the footnotes and annotations added to their work they just make a much bigger literary adventure possible for so many readers Therefore it was a delight to find this work from them as wellThis collection includesUkrainian Tales St John's Eve; The Night Before Christmas; The Teriible Vengeance; Ivan Fyodorovich Sphonka and His Aunt; Old World Landowners; Viy; The Story of How Ivan Ivanovich uarreled with Ivan Nikiforvich;Petersburg Tales Nevsky Prospect; The Dairy of a Madman; The Nose; The Carriage; The Portrait; The OvercoatThere is a touch of modern authors such as Garrison Keillor and Richard Russo to these old world tales Nikolai Gogol was a raconteur par excellence in my view anyway Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol31 March 1809 – 4 March 1852 was a Russian dramatist of Ukrainian originAlthough Gogol was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the preeminent figures of the natural school of Russian literary realism later critics have found in his work a fundamentally romantic sensibility with strains of surrealism and the grotesue The Nose Viy The Overcoat Nevsky Prospekt His early works such as Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka were influenced by his Ukrainian upbringing Ukrainian culture and folklore His later writing satirised political corruption in the Russian Empire The Government Inspector Dead Souls The novel Taras Bulba 1835 and the play Marriage 1842 along with the short stories Diary of a Madman The Tale of How Ivan Ivanovich uarreled with Ivan Nikiforovich The Portrait and The Carriage are also among his best known works Nevertheless subseuent generations of radical critics celebrated Gogol the author in whose world a nose roams the streets of the Russian capital as a great realist a reputation decried by the Encyclopedia Britannica as the triumph of Gogolesue ironyThe leading novelists of the period – notably Yevgeny Zamyatin and Mikhail Bulgakov – also admired Gogol and followed in his footsteps Source Wikipedia Well this was just the formal introduction to the experience your might enjoy when deciding to read Nikolai Gogol I found the stories so rich in atmosphere detail and pathos Romantic a little bit of romantic escapism yet very often satirical with a touch of nostalgia for his homeland His pessimism of life came through as well There was a fine balance between the elements he so effortlessly incorporated into his work He described his childhood farm and the surroundings so vividly the landscapes peasants boisterous village lads the folklore populated with witches devils demonic figures and fantasy In between he threw in realistic incidencespolitical criticism et al of the times they were living in It was like looking at an old Russian painting and without warning being swept into it One can hardly draw a comparison between Gogol and Franz Kafka There is no comparison as far as clarity of thought and intent is concerned Gogol was passionate about life itself He loved writing He loved the intrigue of living Franz Kafka was a troubled tragic soul But brilliant at it in his own right I'm just mentioning this in case someone considers reading Gogol which I highly recommend His work is light yet dark; playful yet serious; raw; unpretentious; from the soul His work is brilliant So many authors such as Kafka Dostoevsky Yevgeny Zamyatin and Mikhail Bulgakov would later borrow from his brilliance and keep his memory alive In fact years later Fyodor Dostoyevsky was to exclaim that all Russian realists had come “from under Gogol’s greatcoat”I strongly recommend this article Writing the Russian Reader into the text Gogol Turgenev and their Audiences Some uotes from his work just to wet your appetite Goodreads uotes of Nikolai Gogol's works I made so many notes that this review will turn into a book if I keep at it lolol So I will refrain I can only accomplish that by sitting on my hands OyForgive me but here is a few There was a church in the hamlet of St Panteleimon if I remember rightly A priest lived by it then Father Afanasy of blessed memory Noticing that Basavriuk did not come to church even on Easter Sunday he decided to reprimand him and put him under a church penance Penance hah He barely escaped “Listen my good sir” the man thundered in reply “you’d better mind your own business and not go meddling in other people’s unless you’d like to have that goat’s gullet of yours plugged with hot kutya” What could be done with the cursed fellow? Father Afanasy merely announced that anyone who kept company with Basavriuk would be regarded as a Catholic an enemy of Christ’s Church and of the whole human race from St John's Eve it’s easier for a woman to kiss the devil meaning no offense than to call another woman a beauty from St John's Eve “If you ever show up in my cottage again or even just under the windows then listen Pyotr by God that’ll be the end of your black moustache and your topknot as well; here it is going twice around your ear but it’ll bid farewell to your head or I’m not Terenty Korzh”from St John's Eve He kept looking to see if the tree’s shadow was getting longer if the setting sun was getting redder—and the impatiently as it went on So drawn out God’s day must have lost its end somewhere from The Terrible Vengeance The river is not mutinous He grumbles and murmurs like an old man nothing pleases him; everything has changed around him; he is uietly at war with the hills forests and meadows on his banks and carries his complaint against them to the Black Seafrom The Terrible VengeanceThis collection was truly a highlight of 2019

  6. James James says:

    Nikolai Gogol based on the image results my Google search spat back reminds me of that uietly excited classmate who's usually game to tag along with you for some mischief making Whoopee cushions and joy buzzers presumably hadn't been around then so one shudders at the tricks his imagination must've improvised From his eyes shines a look too knowing not to have exposed his hastily planned cover ups and landed him in a few or hundred detentions spent here sweeping grounds and there copying lines In short my kinda guy Russian literature since books began making me feel things has been for me that scary mountain whose lack of obvious footholds has sent me running home into the suishier bosoms of easier genres whose peak is peopled with happy campers roasting marshmallows while animatedly discussing scenes from this Dostoevsky classic or that Tolstoy epic What sure hand would as soon as I attempt the climb save me from tripping over the first loose rock and snap my neck? Gogol's while mindful to point out where not to step wouldn't hold mine yet what convinced me to turn to his works first of all was learning of the ripples they caused that soon impacted on others' in waves We all came out of Gogol's 'Overcoat' some dude said which prisoner to that tedious no stones left unturned school of thought that I am rather finally shut the caseNo gripes to be had here about that to be on the same page as evident by how finding no of the book to savor left me so restless my withdrawal dissipated only when I spent half an hour the next day at the bookstore head deep inside The Inspector General a similar collection of another company included and along with several other shorts this one has omitted for crimes against humanity convenience Let's come back to the point the hype? It's real Where Gogol's praisers have stumbled is that they haven't been louder about it Each of the stories 13 in all and besides that lay scattered elsewhere springs from a mind able to hop between moods as simply as switching socks and impressively capture all that in writing that not so much reads as flows By no means mind does Gogol here achieve infallibility St John's Eve where the roller coaster rolls out of the station and The Terrible Vengeance get so twisty and turny I had to read the latter twice before heads and tails could be made of it The Carriage fangirled over to no end by Anton Chekhov fell short of my hopes which granted the preceding unbeatable trifecta kicking off the second half of the book set impossibly high The Overcoat too didn't much measure up to those same expectations People at least in the earlier parts are either regularly found with their arms akimbo or perennially vexed But for all that any misgivings don't matter so much the I think on them If they're not because my attention wandered they're a placement issue; if not that as well then nitpicks Where there are strike outs Gogol makes up for a hundredfold in home runsThe Night Before Christmas is hugely fun and entertaining the vibe throughout fit for a 90's Saturday morning cartoon albeit one soon headed for the chopping block on account of complaints from parents outraged at their bumpkins' being exposed to such degenerate content as a devil who had one last night to wander about the wide world and teach good people to sin Ivan Fyodorovich Shponka and His Aunt contains the strangest dream seuence that contrasted with the mundane goings on its characters face in the waking world not enough weed will ever exist to help make sense of it Old World Landowners even without witches and devils is still plenty captivating with two old couple developed masterfully taking center stage The second scariest short of the lot Viy proves books can take years off such scaredy cats as me as well as that closet scene The Ring have long sucker punched unsuspecting viewers with Wrapping up the first half of Gogol's colorful re imagining of his country's rural life is The uarrel which boasts of a higher laugh per page rate than any other short to date— Excuse me for appearing before you in my natural state says the corpulent main character called Ivanovich Nikiforovich after being barged in on by his friend neighbor and soon to be bitter rival St John's Eve either doesn't lack for bright spots and even those are soon outshone into white oblivion by a passage of just astounding imagery in The Terrible Vengeance that describes the Dnieper river to musical perfection Gogol's genius aimed at the then capital burns even hotter While not as inventively and unapologetically fantastic and outrageous as their Ukrainian predecessors the Petersburg Tales far from stumbling for their lack of broomstick riding witches moon stealing devils and the odd incest are likelier than the former to worm their way into the collective subconscious to there make a permanent home The devil representative in Gogol's wacky world of the ubiuitousness of bad influences whose seduction every day tempts us lurks even in the city but almost as an afterthought what need have we of the ultimate troublemaker when man himself can beat the master at his own game? In the majority of the shorts no puppet master hides behind purple curtains pulling levers and pushing buttons to nudge events his way The result is often spectacular Nevsky Prospect throws a knockout from the opening bell soaking us with ejaculations the narrator makes over what a great place Nevsky Prospect is and then magnifies the microscope over two acuaintances each different in their approaches chasing after two women spotted there Gogol at one point shows so powerfully what it is to fall in love that it would still be a effective form of communication than if telepathy were possible The Diary of a Madman as the title gives away takes us into the mind of an apparently healthy everyman whose mental deterioration should well satiate that morbidly curious class of gawkers by who gravitate towards car accident sites Dogs exchanging letters and talking politics aren't even the weirdest things here Next The Nose seems straightforward enough almost too straightforward someone finds someone else's nose inside his bread one morning and after his story's or less wrapped up we trail the said noseless man as he tries to locate it No other story however has ever so completely robbed me of my words myself prostrate with awe at Gogol's audacity as this one where he blindsides you with the last expectation you can think of It's a tough act no one wants to follow so The Carriage with its relatively normal happenings can be forgiven for not wowing some people The Portrait on the other hand picks things up and Gogol is back where he's comfortable keeping therapists in business by sending to their recliner chairs us traumatized readers The story separated into two parts details the rags to riches to ruin life of an artist called Chartkov whose painting skills are moderate and potential unmistakable who happens upon a mysterious portrait of a creepy old man His stare which Gogol's description gives major heft is worse to imagine than to watch the best horror has to offer cinema In a nutshell there's gold hidden behind the portrait's frame that Chartkov exploits to better his position in society and that in the end destroys him The second part delves fully into the portrait's origins and is no less mesmerizing Along the way Gogol touches on the artist's life and their creative process social manipulation and superficiality competition and obsolescence It's a meaty story with something for everyone and as with most of his works so far to relish anew with every reread The Overcoat the last in line continues the supernatural element The Portrait brought back but dominated by the down to earth routines of mediocre bullied outcast Akaky Akakievich it takes a backseat After his tatty overcoat a source of ridicule at work became useless as protection against the brutal Russian winter Akaky gets another made which gains him confidence and popularity His moment in the sun doesn't last though and from there does the story return to familiar grounds doom and gloom This second bookend may have suffered from the same positional problem The Carriage did the lesson here short story collections read from cover to cover are bound to favor some and hurt others but hindsight is its friend There's a matter of fact deadpan uality to the narration that gets funnier in retrospect A long suffering tone there also can't be missed when the writing takes great pains to explain how Akaky Akakievich came by that name the purpose of which section is obvious and hilarious when Wikipedia to the rescue you read later that it is the Russian euivalent of John Johnson as well as sounds like the Russian word obkakat or kaka meaning to smear with excrement that makes it read as Poop Poopson The idea that the likes of Dostoevsky wasn't above toilet humor warms these cockles greatly Then on the aforementioned Russian winter it's not generally that it's the enemy of poor people but that it's the enemy of people earning a salary of four hundred roubles or thereabouts The exactitude is killer Another An order was issued for the police to catch the dead man at all costs dead or alive Added to Gogol's in jokes and humor is a uestion that if given any consideration is an easy road to a panic attack what's your overcoat? Another character features in the story that goes by no other name than the important person and in answer he would probably bring up his rank which is as much smokes and mirrors as Akaky's overcoat is that masks their total ignorance about certain workings of the world The balance between such introspective moments and the satirical asides in this story and the others is if you ask me not a half bad explanation for why Gogol is ducking awesome

  7. J.M. Hushour J.M. Hushour says:

    Gogol wrote many fine short stories almost all of which I think are collected here Since I read the well known Petersburg tales recently I skipped those though the PV translations are always better The gems here are the stories subsumed under the Ukrainian Tales most of which deal with supernatural themes in my opinion Gogol's real forte St John's Eve and the Night Before Christmas deal with hellish visitation and torment Viy one of my favorites also check out the surreal film version from the 60s finds a young seminarian watching over a dead girl's corpseuntil she opens her eyes It's all downhill from there The other stories collected here are funny variations on Gogol's latter day themes one finds in Dead Souls the silliness of the provincial gentry and the general absurdity of society in general whether through social s litigation or fancy carriages

  8. Alex Alex says:

    My first reaction to Gogol was bewilderment It's funny and engaging to read butwhat the hell is it about? I'm not sure what the point of Diary of a Madman is although I know I enjoyed itPevear and Volokhonsky's intro is helpful although it contains a number of minor spoilers Their point is that if you try to understand Gogol you are failing Gogol himself didn't understand Gogol We still do not know what Gogol is says some guy they uoted PV write that Gogol as compared to traditional storytellers has nothing in mind Memory plays no part in his work He does not know where the act of writing will lead himPushkin an early and ardent supporter wrote Here is real gaiety honest unconstrained without mincing without primness And in places what poetry What sensitivity All this is so unusual in our present day literature that I still haven't recovered And that seems fair to me It's still unusual now although at least we have Borges; maybe we should shut up about what it means and just have a good time with it2017 11 17 Diary of a MadmanThe madman is a clerk and right away hears two dogs chatting One belongs to the directir's hot daughter Never mind never mind Silence The dogs are corresponding by letter; he steals the letters to find out about the daughter Meanwhile Spain is in turmoil the throne is vacant It cannot be he says that there was no king A state cannot be without a king There is a king only he's somewhere unknown luckily our clerk realizes that he is actually indeed the king of Spain Around this time the dates on his diary entries start getting royal from Dec 8 to the 86th of Martober to date none The day had no date He is eventually returned to Spain which bears a passing resemblance to an insane asylum where he is shaved and beaten and possibly murdered

  9. kaelan kaelan says:

    These tales and novellas are incredible I was already familiar with The Overcoat and The Nose both of which exude a certain bureaucratic Bartleby ish vibe But what especially impressed me this time around were the earlier Ukrainian Tales such as the poignant Old World Landowners and the indescribably disturbing Terrible Vengeance which combine folklore proto po mo narrative and surreal nightmare logic into something completely and utterly sui generisLess impressive in my view is the now ubiuitous Pevear Volokhonsky translation I'd enjoyed PV's version of The Brothers Karamazov – a novel largely consisting of dialogue and plot – but found their doggedly literal approach ill suited to such a vibrant prose stylist as Gogol In their hands Gogol's language often came across as stiff awkward and vaguely academic I had a similar problem with their translation of Bulgakov People say that Guerney's the one to get when it comes to Dead Souls but English language readers of the Tales may just need to buckle down and learn some RussianA highly rewarding read nonetheless

  10. Jean-marcel Jean-marcel says:

    This anthology is so achingly good that I read it slowly over a period of abouta year and when I was through I was extremely sad that there weren't any tales for me to come to afresh But I can still re read these many a time and always gain once again that feeling of a glorious unfettered sort of artistic madness that teeters on so many precipices but never falls nor falters Here we have wild humour sincere and touching expressions of humanity carousing feasting absurdity and threatening darkness touched with a hint of irreverent levity even at the worst of timesI love the Ukrainian tales with their lyrical style and descriptions of tiny hamlets and provincial revelry But these are not cozy tales; in fact there is a real grimness leaning over your shoulder in many of these Viy utterly surprised and thrilled me with its depiction of the macabre and the horrific especially as I didn't imagine at the time any writers in Gogol's time addressing the supernatural with such plain open language and without a hint of repentence or avoidance of the bloody details Viy even became the basis for Mario Bava's classic film Black Sunday one of the ultimate gothic revenge movies but believe it or not the Gogol story is even darker It's also kind of funny though especially with all of Gogol's descriptions of the young priest and his fruitless efforts to get away from the village so he wouldn't have to perform an exorcism Then there's A Terrible Vengeance which is probably the dreariest grimmest thing in this anthology and makes you feel bitter toward everything But Gogol seems to be saying you need this You simply must be remindedI notice a certain sad wistfulness in the Petersburg tales I get the feeling that Gogol while kind of set afire by the cosmopolitan glories of Petersburg missed his homeland terribly Of course I could be misapprehending here but the character of the stories in the second half of the anthology is differentthe pain introspective the appeals to human nature touched by genuine sad experience I was particularly moved by Nevsky Prospekt which is a story so modern in its apprehensions and depictions of urban life that its uite startling and eye opening I wonder if Dickens ever read Gogol?The style of Gogol whether told and these stories really do all feel as though they were told and not written in Petersburg or Kiev and the surrounding villages is steady and assured throughout the book And lest you think that in Petersburg Gogol gave up his provincialism and love of the fantastic and strange think againall this stuff is very much still alive in the big city There's nothing that Gogol can see that can't at some point be touched by the supernatural and eerie This is in fact one of the things that I love most about him He tells his stories as though they were folk knowledge but the introduction in this book stresses that in fact they weren't and that he really made most of this stuff up himself I've a feeling he would have been a strange compelling man to meet The translation by Pevear and Belakhovsky is excellent and although I don't know Russian I always look for their translations of Russian classics because they feel very genuine somehow very natural and alive with their attempt to communicate the lyrical power of the writers whose work they bring to the english speaking world

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