Sušna doba Kindle ß Sušna Epub / Hardcover

Sušna doba Kindle ß Sušna Epub / Hardcover

 Sušna doba ✫ [PDF] ✑ Sušna doba By Gabriela Babnik ✸ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Gabriela Babnik’s novel Dry Season breaks the mold of what we usually expect from a writer from a small Central European nation With a global perspective Babnik takes on the themes of racism the rol Gabriela Babnik’s novel Dry Season breaks the mold of what we usually expect from a writer from a small Central European nation With a global perspective Babnik takes on the themes of racism the Sušna Epub / role of women in modern society and the loneliness of the human conditionDry Season is a record of an unusual love affair Anna is a year old designer from Slovenia and Ismael is a year old from Burkino Faso who was brought up on the street where he was often the victim of abuse What unites them is the loneliness of their bodies a tragic childhood and the dry hamartan season during which neither nature nor love is able to flourish She soon realizes that the emptiness between them is not really caused by their skin colour and age difference but predominantly by her belonging to the Western culture in which she has lost or abandoned all the preordained roles of daughter wife and mother Sex does not outstrip the loneliness and repressed secrets from the past surface into a world she sees as much crueller and at the same time innocent than her own Cleverly written as an alternating narrative of both sides in the relationship the novel is interlaced with magic realism.


10 thoughts on “ Sušna doba

  1. Elizabeth (Alaska) Elizabeth (Alaska) says:

    First let me say that I never would have learned about this title let alone read it if my challenge group weren't trying as a group to read something set in every country of the world Burkina Faso has not yet been claimed and it seemed such an out of the way place that it might go neglected for some time This includes two first person accounts which don't exactly alternate but are definitely interspersed For the first sentence or two of a new section it wasn't always clear who was speaking but clarity was uickly restored I should have had empathy for Ana the 62 year old woman but for some reason did not There was just something off about her and I couldn't uite feel for her The ending which was completely unseen by me gave me the reason for my disuiet Ismael the 27 year old African I felt for entirely Parts of his story made my heart ache literally It goes without saying that characterization is uite strong in this novel and is a good enough reason for reading without the settingThe prose is uite good and varied and I would lean toward another by this author for this reason even without the strong characterization I thought about the translator's role in this There are occasional short segments where the Africans' voice is pidgin English This must not have been an easy job to convert from the original Slovenian to English When a description says it includes magical realism I don't know what to expect As a general rule I don't like this but I know I have exceptions So I decided to plunge ahead despite that It was of the type that I don't like than the type I'm willing to accept but not so much that I couldn't move ahead For me it was blurry around the edges There are those who could find enough ick factors in this to avoid it The freuent reference to a man's penis was certainly different from my normal reading This easily crosses the 5 star threshold and I'm very glad to have read it


  2. Kelsi H Kelsi H says:

    Please check out all of my reviews at Faso is an unusual setting for a writer from Central Europe but the unexpectedness adds another layer to the story Ana a Slovenian woman in her 60s travels to the small African nation and begins an affair with 27 year old Ismael They are united by loneliness and tragic pasts filled with both emotional and physical abuse Ana’s world is in the west yet she has essentially rejected it – she prefers to embrace Ismael’s African culture At first it seems like colonial appropriation but as Ana’s story unfolds it reads like a twist on intersectional feminism Ana as a repressed woman forming a bond with another “other” Her thoughts only begin to veer into racism as she idealizes the “innocence” of the African people and views Ismael as a naïve young boy – in fact he has experienced much in his short life than she has in her sixty two years She acts as though his innocence will rub off on her and make her whole again after the losses she has suffered back in Europe The novel is written in alternating POVs which made it hard to get into because it wasn’t always clear who was narrating The voice switches with no headings – I’m not sure if that was a problem with the ARC or whether it was meant to be disconcerting adding unexpected confusion On top of that Ana is an unreliable narrator and even she seems to be unclear about which events are real “But that had been a happy time so happy that especially when I look back on it maybe it never happened” Loc 397 Ana was adopted and she is not at all grateful to her adoptive parents She has no respect for them and says it would have made no difference if they had left her on the orphanage floor Ismael is an outsider too and he can relate to the difficulties of family life Ana leaves Slovenia because of issues with her adult son then takes a lover that is younger than he is Upon seeing Ismael naked she is reminded of her son Likewise Ismael dreams freuently of his mother during his relationship with Ana – it is all very Freudian The method of storytelling is often postmodern with hints of magic realism and even a nod to One Hundred Years of Solitude when Ana refers to “Remedios the Beauty” but it is old fashioned at times too It reads like a chronological memoir but the narrators also speak directly to the reader Eventually Ana begins to mix up past and present with memory overlapping reality There are many metafictional references to writing and novels and it becomes hard to tell whether either character is real or just a figment of the other’s imagination – are they each a creation of the others’ deepest hopes and fears?The setting was filled with great details and I wanted to hear much about it The plot was subtle and nostalgic drifting through dreams and memory Ana and Ismael real or imagined come together because they are lonely – but neither one can complete the other because they are not whole themselves Dreamlike and often magical this was a beautiful story about sadness and loss between two very different cultures I received this novel from Istros Books and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review


  3. Melissa Melissa says:

    I have to admit that before I read this book I really knew nothing about the small West African nation of Burkina Faso The setting alone of this story in this small and politically volatile country taught me so many things but the book as a whole is also a fantastic readFrom all outward appearances the two main characters of this story could not be different Anna is a 62 year old white woman from Slovenia who has had a successful career as a textile artist Ismael is a 27 year old black man from Burkina Faso who has grown up on the streets and has never had any real job or career It is surprising even shocking that Anna and Ismael become lovers but the author weaves their tales together so perfectly that in the end we are convinced that this relationship has had a powerful impact on both of themThe narrative alternates between the point of view of both main characters We learn that Anna was rescued from an orphanage by her parents who in a last ditch effort to save their marriage agree to adopt a child since they cannot have one of their own But her parent’s strained relationship takes an emotional toll on her as a little girl as she is mostly left to be raised by a housekeeper Anna’s father is busy with his multitude of extramarital affairs and Anna’s mother remains aloof from her daughter while she constantly works at her sewing machine making women’s lingerie Anna eventually falls into an unhappy marriage with a man whom her mother chose for her and her only son from this marriage ends up in a mental institution Anna abandons her home her family and her past to find some peace and uiet in AfricaIsmael when he was very young lived in a remote African village with his mother who was an outcast Ismael never knew who his father was and he is constantly witnessing his mother being abused by fellow villagers as she is tied to the “shaming pole” and spit upon We are never told exactly what his mother’s sin is in the eyes of the villagers but there is reason to suspect it has something to do with Ismael’s lack of a father Ismael and his mother eventually migrate to the streets of Ouagadougou the capital city of Burkina Faso where they live in cardboard boxes under a bridge When Ismael’s mother is killed and he is left alone in a city full of dangerous people he is taken in by strangers who never really fulfill the role of a family for him He stays with an “ebony” woman and her husband for a while who have lost their own son and are trying to keep Ismael as their surrogate child Ismael also stays with a man named Baba who has been the only positive male role model in his life But Ismael gets pulled into the illegal and dangerous activities of Baba’s son MalikEven though they are born on different continents and decades apart there are some important ties that bind Anna and Ismael together They both feel abandoned and isolated neither of them knows their real father and both of their mothers are emotionally distant Anna and Ismael have separate and distinct stories told in alternating chapters but the way in which the author gradually weaves together their stories is brilliant At first appearance it would seem that Anna and Ismael are using their sexual relationship to suppress their feelings of abandonment and isolation But as they share their stories with one another a deeper emotional bond is forgedSet against the backdrop of the harmattan the dry season in West Africa this novel is a must read for anyone who enjoys brilliant literary writing with strong and intense characters I kept asking myself throughout the novel why of all places on earth Anna would pick this obscure West African country to flee to The dry season is one of extremes extreme amounts of dust extreme changes in temperatures extreme fog and eventually extreme downpours of rain when the season ends This is the perfect setting for two characters who are much like the dry season itself both going through the extremes experiences of human existenceThis is my first title from Istros Books an Independent British publisher that specializes in translating books from Eastern Europe into English and I am very excited to see what else they have in their catalogue


  4. Tuck Tuck says:

    Twisty literary tale of older euro woman visiting escaping from her oldlife? Burkina Faso and falling In love with a much younger street tough fella Mayhem ensues Has a back and forth pov that gets tighter and tighter focus as story goes along Fun local facts and history and politics of a country that has had some very down downs in 21st century after being a paragon of normality for much of latter 20th


  5. Amira Amira says:

    I love the honesty of the words in this book


  6. Ingeborg Ingeborg says:

    Very well written there is a lot of poetry in this novel


  7. Nose in a book (Kate) Nose in a book (Kate) says:

    This is a strange book difficult to follow at times but always lyrical and occasionally outstanding It opens with two people in bed together in a hotel room in Ouagadougou They are Ana – a 62 year old artist here on holiday – and Ismael a 27 year old local who spent much of his life living on the street It’s an unlikely pairing and one that doesn’t seem destined to last but as the narrative alternates between their points of view we discover things they have in common In a way they are both running away from their daily lives and as they gradually open up to each other we learn that neither of them is uite what you expectAs the title implies the story takes place during the dry season in Burkina Faso and this natural phenomenon is reflected in the book’s themes There is an overwhelming loneliness surrounding both characters perhaps rooted in the fact that they are both orphans and both had surrogate parents who didn’t really show them love Ana wonders whether it is fair for a woman of her age to “steal” a young man’s chance of having children She already has a grown son one she never really wanted and has ambivalent feelings about She worries about whether her life has produced anything in the end Ismael has spent most of his life with nothing largely alone and his worries and dreams are less abstract But he is still a thinker an intellectualRead my full review


  8. Phil Phil says:

    I was disappointed with this read I just couldn't get in to itI did continue but I just felt a disconnect to the characters and the narrative of it One paragraph on the third last page made me think about the award for bad sex writing That is not a good thing


  9. Pogue Pogue says:

    This is a book I chose to read for my reading around the world trip I could not finish it I think I uit half way through the third chapter I felt nothing for either character and I am going to have to find another book for this country


  10. Cristelle Snyman Cristelle Snyman says:

    35 stars


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “ Sušna doba

  1. Elizabeth (Alaska) Elizabeth (Alaska) says:

    First let me say that I never would have learned about this title let alone read it if my challenge group weren't trying as a group to read something set in every country of the world Burkina Faso has not yet been claimed and it seemed such an out of the way place that it might go neglected for some time This includes two first person accounts which don't exactly alternate but are definitely interspersed For the first sentence or two of a new section it wasn't always clear who was speaking but clarity was uickly restored I should have had empathy for Ana the 62 year old woman but for some reason did not There was just something off about her and I couldn't uite feel for her The ending which was completely unseen by me gave me the reason for my disuiet Ismael the 27 year old African I felt for entirely Parts of his story made my heart ache literally It goes without saying that characterization is uite strong in this novel and is a good enough reason for reading without the settingThe prose is uite good and varied and I would lean toward another by this author for this reason even without the strong characterization I thought about the translator's role in this There are occasional short segments where the Africans' voice is pidgin English This must not have been an easy job to convert from the original Slovenian to English When a description says it includes magical realism I don't know what to expect As a general rule I don't like this but I know I have exceptions So I decided to plunge ahead despite that It was of the type that I don't like than the type I'm willing to accept but not so much that I couldn't move ahead For me it was blurry around the edges There are those who could find enough ick factors in this to avoid it The freuent reference to a man's penis was certainly different from my normal reading This easily crosses the 5 star threshold and I'm very glad to have read it

  2. Kelsi H Kelsi H says:

    Please check out all of my reviews at Faso is an unusual setting for a writer from Central Europe but the unexpectedness adds another layer to the story Ana a Slovenian woman in her 60s travels to the small African nation and begins an affair with 27 year old Ismael They are united by loneliness and tragic pasts filled with both emotional and physical abuse Ana’s world is in the west yet she has essentially rejected it – she prefers to embrace Ismael’s African culture At first it seems like colonial appropriation but as Ana’s story unfolds it reads like a twist on intersectional feminism Ana as a repressed woman forming a bond with another “other” Her thoughts only begin to veer into racism as she idealizes the “innocence” of the African people and views Ismael as a naïve young boy – in fact he has experienced much in his short life than she has in her sixty two years She acts as though his innocence will rub off on her and make her whole again after the losses she has suffered back in Europe The novel is written in alternating POVs which made it hard to get into because it wasn’t always clear who was narrating The voice switches with no headings – I’m not sure if that was a problem with the ARC or whether it was meant to be disconcerting adding unexpected confusion On top of that Ana is an unreliable narrator and even she seems to be unclear about which events are real “But that had been a happy time so happy that especially when I look back on it maybe it never happened” Loc 397 Ana was adopted and she is not at all grateful to her adoptive parents She has no respect for them and says it would have made no difference if they had left her on the orphanage floor Ismael is an outsider too and he can relate to the difficulties of family life Ana leaves Slovenia because of issues with her adult son then takes a lover that is younger than he is Upon seeing Ismael naked she is reminded of her son Likewise Ismael dreams freuently of his mother during his relationship with Ana – it is all very Freudian The method of storytelling is often postmodern with hints of magic realism and even a nod to One Hundred Years of Solitude when Ana refers to “Remedios the Beauty” but it is old fashioned at times too It reads like a chronological memoir but the narrators also speak directly to the reader Eventually Ana begins to mix up past and present with memory overlapping reality There are many metafictional references to writing and novels and it becomes hard to tell whether either character is real or just a figment of the other’s imagination – are they each a creation of the others’ deepest hopes and fears?The setting was filled with great details and I wanted to hear much about it The plot was subtle and nostalgic drifting through dreams and memory Ana and Ismael real or imagined come together because they are lonely – but neither one can complete the other because they are not whole themselves Dreamlike and often magical this was a beautiful story about sadness and loss between two very different cultures I received this novel from Istros Books and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  3. Melissa Melissa says:

    I have to admit that before I read this book I really knew nothing about the small West African nation of Burkina Faso The setting alone of this story in this small and politically volatile country taught me so many things but the book as a whole is also a fantastic readFrom all outward appearances the two main characters of this story could not be different Anna is a 62 year old white woman from Slovenia who has had a successful career as a textile artist Ismael is a 27 year old black man from Burkina Faso who has grown up on the streets and has never had any real job or career It is surprising even shocking that Anna and Ismael become lovers but the author weaves their tales together so perfectly that in the end we are convinced that this relationship has had a powerful impact on both of themThe narrative alternates between the point of view of both main characters We learn that Anna was rescued from an orphanage by her parents who in a last ditch effort to save their marriage agree to adopt a child since they cannot have one of their own But her parent’s strained relationship takes an emotional toll on her as a little girl as she is mostly left to be raised by a housekeeper Anna’s father is busy with his multitude of extramarital affairs and Anna’s mother remains aloof from her daughter while she constantly works at her sewing machine making women’s lingerie Anna eventually falls into an unhappy marriage with a man whom her mother chose for her and her only son from this marriage ends up in a mental institution Anna abandons her home her family and her past to find some peace and uiet in AfricaIsmael when he was very young lived in a remote African village with his mother who was an outcast Ismael never knew who his father was and he is constantly witnessing his mother being abused by fellow villagers as she is tied to the “shaming pole” and spit upon We are never told exactly what his mother’s sin is in the eyes of the villagers but there is reason to suspect it has something to do with Ismael’s lack of a father Ismael and his mother eventually migrate to the streets of Ouagadougou the capital city of Burkina Faso where they live in cardboard boxes under a bridge When Ismael’s mother is killed and he is left alone in a city full of dangerous people he is taken in by strangers who never really fulfill the role of a family for him He stays with an “ebony” woman and her husband for a while who have lost their own son and are trying to keep Ismael as their surrogate child Ismael also stays with a man named Baba who has been the only positive male role model in his life But Ismael gets pulled into the illegal and dangerous activities of Baba’s son MalikEven though they are born on different continents and decades apart there are some important ties that bind Anna and Ismael together They both feel abandoned and isolated neither of them knows their real father and both of their mothers are emotionally distant Anna and Ismael have separate and distinct stories told in alternating chapters but the way in which the author gradually weaves together their stories is brilliant At first appearance it would seem that Anna and Ismael are using their sexual relationship to suppress their feelings of abandonment and isolation But as they share their stories with one another a deeper emotional bond is forgedSet against the backdrop of the harmattan the dry season in West Africa this novel is a must read for anyone who enjoys brilliant literary writing with strong and intense characters I kept asking myself throughout the novel why of all places on earth Anna would pick this obscure West African country to flee to The dry season is one of extremes extreme amounts of dust extreme changes in temperatures extreme fog and eventually extreme downpours of rain when the season ends This is the perfect setting for two characters who are much like the dry season itself both going through the extremes experiences of human existenceThis is my first title from Istros Books an Independent British publisher that specializes in translating books from Eastern Europe into English and I am very excited to see what else they have in their catalogue

  4. Tuck Tuck says:

    Twisty literary tale of older euro woman visiting escaping from her oldlife? Burkina Faso and falling In love with a much younger street tough fella Mayhem ensues Has a back and forth pov that gets tighter and tighter focus as story goes along Fun local facts and history and politics of a country that has had some very down downs in 21st century after being a paragon of normality for much of latter 20th

  5. Amira Amira says:

    I love the honesty of the words in this book

  6. Ingeborg Ingeborg says:

    Very well written there is a lot of poetry in this novel

  7. Nose in a book (Kate) Nose in a book (Kate) says:

    This is a strange book difficult to follow at times but always lyrical and occasionally outstanding It opens with two people in bed together in a hotel room in Ouagadougou They are Ana – a 62 year old artist here on holiday – and Ismael a 27 year old local who spent much of his life living on the street It’s an unlikely pairing and one that doesn’t seem destined to last but as the narrative alternates between their points of view we discover things they have in common In a way they are both running away from their daily lives and as they gradually open up to each other we learn that neither of them is uite what you expectAs the title implies the story takes place during the dry season in Burkina Faso and this natural phenomenon is reflected in the book’s themes There is an overwhelming loneliness surrounding both characters perhaps rooted in the fact that they are both orphans and both had surrogate parents who didn’t really show them love Ana wonders whether it is fair for a woman of her age to “steal” a young man’s chance of having children She already has a grown son one she never really wanted and has ambivalent feelings about She worries about whether her life has produced anything in the end Ismael has spent most of his life with nothing largely alone and his worries and dreams are less abstract But he is still a thinker an intellectualRead my full review

  8. Phil Phil says:

    I was disappointed with this read I just couldn't get in to itI did continue but I just felt a disconnect to the characters and the narrative of it One paragraph on the third last page made me think about the award for bad sex writing That is not a good thing

  9. Pogue Pogue says:

    This is a book I chose to read for my reading around the world trip I could not finish it I think I uit half way through the third chapter I felt nothing for either character and I am going to have to find another book for this country

  10. Cristelle Snyman Cristelle Snyman says:

    35 stars

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *