Love and Mrs Sargent MOBI ☆ Love and ePUB ´

Love and Mrs Sargent MOBI ☆ Love and ePUB ´

Love and Mrs Sargent ❰Download❯ ➻ Love and Mrs Sargent Author Virginia Rowans – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Mrs Richard Sargent—respected widow envied socialite the most widely read advice columnist in America the nicest and most conservative woman around—is such a success that not only is she in talks Mrs Richard Sargent—respected widow envied socialite the most widely read advice columnist in America the nicest and Love and ePUB ´ most conservative woman around—is such a success that not only is she in talks for her own television show but she's soon to claim the jewel of her crown the coveted Mother of the Year award When a muckraking reporter from a liberal magazine spends several days in her household however he discovers that Mrs Sargent's two adult children would prefer any mother other than their own—and when the reporter moves into Mrs Sargent's bedroom he discovers she's anything but respectableLove Mrs Sargent is the last of four novels Patrick Dennis wrote under his other pseudonym of Virginia Rowans.


12 thoughts on “Love and Mrs Sargent

  1. V. Briceland V. Briceland says:

    I wasn't surprised to discover when I checked Eric Myers' biography of Patrick Dennis Uncle Mame that the story of Love and Mrs Sargent had originally intended for the stage The book reads very much like a novelization of a stage play with—unusual for Dennis—an extremely limited cast distinct acts and dialogue that reads like a script Love and Mrs Sargent the last of the four books Dennis wrote under his female pseudonym of Virginia Rowans works best if it's imagined in the context of the film director Douglas Sirk The novel has all the elements of a Sirk midcentury melodrama; I suspect it's no coincidence that it was imagined and written a year after the release of Imitation of Life Like that film it features a mother who gives her all in order to provide the best for her children only to have them turn against her As in All that Heaven Allows it features a torrid and maybe even inappropriate romance between a socialite and a much younger man Despite its comic secondary characters—Mrs Flood manages to be both batty and touching at the same time—it's definitely a melodrama with the glummest ending ever featured in a Patrick Dennis novelAnd perhaps the melodrama that drives the novel would have worked better on the stage or in a filmed version; the last half of the novel in which Mrs Sargent's faults are laid bare reads less like a Patrick Dennis novel and like rant against Mom and apple pie It's a screed in which everything Mrs Sargent has done is shown to be hypocritical and blindly self serving If it weren't so readable I'd swear the author was working out some of his own mommy issuesBut the book is compulsively readable even so than some of his widely known and easily available works It's fun to see some of the touches here that appear in later Dennis novels The terrible novels that Mrs Sargent's son Dicky writes here—one novel that hints at the character's latent homosexuality and another set in France with funny bidet stories—are both mocked by theme in Dennis' much superior Tony several years on Dennis' real life chum Christine Jorgenson the first widely known recipient of gender reassignment surgery makes a cameo appearance—and perhaps even exists as a sly commentary on the author's moonlighting with a female pseudonym as he continued to write books under his masculine pseudonym of Patrick Dennis Love and Mrs Sargent would prove to be the last of Dennis' four Virginia Rowans novels; it proved to be an acerbic amuse bouche for a decade of acid satire that was to come


  2. Brie Brie says:

    I'm glad that Sheila Sargent isn't my mother


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12 thoughts on “Love and Mrs Sargent

  1. V. Briceland V. Briceland says:

    I wasn't surprised to discover when I checked Eric Myers' biography of Patrick Dennis Uncle Mame that the story of Love and Mrs Sargent had originally intended for the stage The book reads very much like a novelization of a stage play with—unusual for Dennis—an extremely limited cast distinct acts and dialogue that reads like a script Love and Mrs Sargent the last of the four books Dennis wrote under his female pseudonym of Virginia Rowans works best if it's imagined in the context of the film director Douglas Sirk The novel has all the elements of a Sirk midcentury melodrama; I suspect it's no coincidence that it was imagined and written a year after the release of Imitation of Life Like that film it features a mother who gives her all in order to provide the best for her children only to have them turn against her As in All that Heaven Allows it features a torrid and maybe even inappropriate romance between a socialite and a much younger man Despite its comic secondary characters—Mrs Flood manages to be both batty and touching at the same time—it's definitely a melodrama with the glummest ending ever featured in a Patrick Dennis novelAnd perhaps the melodrama that drives the novel would have worked better on the stage or in a filmed version; the last half of the novel in which Mrs Sargent's faults are laid bare reads less like a Patrick Dennis novel and like rant against Mom and apple pie It's a screed in which everything Mrs Sargent has done is shown to be hypocritical and blindly self serving If it weren't so readable I'd swear the author was working out some of his own mommy issuesBut the book is compulsively readable even so than some of his widely known and easily available works It's fun to see some of the touches here that appear in later Dennis novels The terrible novels that Mrs Sargent's son Dicky writes here—one novel that hints at the character's latent homosexuality and another set in France with funny bidet stories—are both mocked by theme in Dennis' much superior Tony several years on Dennis' real life chum Christine Jorgenson the first widely known recipient of gender reassignment surgery makes a cameo appearance—and perhaps even exists as a sly commentary on the author's moonlighting with a female pseudonym as he continued to write books under his masculine pseudonym of Patrick Dennis Love and Mrs Sargent would prove to be the last of Dennis' four Virginia Rowans novels; it proved to be an acerbic amuse bouche for a decade of acid satire that was to come

  2. Brie Brie says:

    I'm glad that Sheila Sargent isn't my mother

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *