East Los Angeles: History of a Barrio Epub ✓

East Los Angeles: History of a Barrio Epub ✓


  • Paperback
  • 232 pages
  • East Los Angeles: History of a Barrio
  • Richardo Romo
  • English
  • 07 July 2016
  • 9780292720411

10 thoughts on “East Los Angeles: History of a Barrio

  1. David Groves David Groves says:

    Although this book is solid and really is a must read jam packed with facts and extremely informative the title is misleading It's not about the neighborhoods and stories within the East LA community it's about the social currents and eddies that led to the formation of the barrio called East LA Romo covers the Mexican origins of LA the takeover of the city by Anglos in the late 1840s the fascinating way in which whites subjugated browns to a second class position in the late 19th century and then goes into the seminal period from 1900 1930 when refugees from the Mexican Diaz dictatorship began forming a huge Mexican American community During this period Romo examines how Mexicans moved into the various East LA neighborhoods where they settled and what the racial makeup was of the different neighborhoods He pretty much stops at 1930 however except for a uick afterword in which he briskly covers the years 1930 1975Romo goes into great detail about the employment opportunities of the Mexican worker what they could do for a living and what they were barred from doing This is fascinating Rather than being paid by job description they were paid by race Chinese received than Mexicans for example for the same work Romo breaks down the number of white collar Mexicans only about 6% depending on the year sole proprietors and unskilled laborers about 70% depending on the year He uotes one businessman on the common belief among whites that Mexicans were thought of like horses or mules than people who could learn job skills Other topics covered in great detail include discrimination prejudice nativism assimilation and AmericanizationThroughout the book Romo goes into great detail certainly than most people would want in backing up his conclusions This book has numbers numbers and numbers This must delight academics into the next millennium And if you want to get into the weeds on for example specific jobs as my cousin wants to this book is for you Her grandfather for example ran a grocery store in the Rampart area in the 1920s and this book expresses exactly how rare an accomplishment that was Only about 6% of Mexicans were business owners Romo tells us and many of those were grocers as he was He also goes into detail about my own grandparents' various occupations including railroad workers fruit pickers meat packers ditch diggers brickmakers painters and the like I wanted to know about the different neighborhoods in East LA and to learn how Boyle Heights differed from Belvedere Maravilla Lincoln Heights and other sections I wanted to know about the nightclubs grocery stores and barber shops I wanted to get the flavor of the streets I wanted to taste the tamales kreplach and grits from their own respective ethnic groups I wanted to learn about the political organizations and how they ranted Alas there was little of thatif you're looking for facts and statistics that nail down excellent conclusions this is it It's an academic work most of all with everything documented In the footnotes for example I discovered a source that I would have never known existed a Mexican consulate report from 1926 27 Who would have thought to look at the Mexican consulate for retrievable documents? This is why I had to read it a second time This is not a book to skim or even to check out of a library because you'll want to spend time with it reading sections setting it aside remembering what you read piecing it together with other sets of knowledge and then rereading and fixing it in place in your head This is how a reader comes to really know a subject by incorporating it into their minds step by step and in various ways This book was an early work by an academic who is now president of the University of Texas at San Antonio How America has changed


  2. Janet Janet says:

    workmanlike But it is from 1983


  3. Andrea Andrea says:

    A foundational book really in the effort to reclaim a history where what little had been written had all but been erased Also a key book on the early history of East Los Angeles this is great if you're looking for empirical data a historical overview or a summary of what had been written to date You can tell that this is a beginning a book to open up the conversation to start a research ball rolling on the history of the Californios Mexicanos Chicanos of East Los It's enough to get you excited to read to dig into what the local papers were actually covering what the pachucos were really all about and the racism of the riots how in the hell the US government was able to deport over 100000 people to Mexico and the how presence of such a large and vibrant community goes all but unnoticed in everything but the scare literature with people like Fogelson making ridiculous racist remarks into the 1960s It's an overview a taster with solid empirical evidence on population and occupation that is needed to take scholarship to the next level Which is where I'm heading


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East Los Angeles: History of a Barrio❰Ebook❯ ➨ East Los Angeles: History of a Barrio Author Richardo Romo – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk This is the story of the largest Mexican American community in the United States the city within a city known as East Los Angeles How did this barrio of over one million men and women occupying an are This is the story of Angeles: History PDF/EPUB » the largest Mexican American community in the United States the city within a city known as East Los Angeles How did this barrio of over one million men and women occupying an area greater than Manhattan or Washington DC come to beAlthough promoted early in this century as a workers' paradise Los Angeles fared poorly in attracting European immigrants and American blue collar workers Wages were low and these workers were understandably reluctant to come to a city which was also troubled by East Los eBook Ì labor strife Mexicans made up the difference arriving in the city in massive numbersWho these Mexicans were and the conditions that caused them to leave their own country are revealed in East Los Angeles The author examines how they adjusted to life in one of the fastest growing cities in the United States how they fared in this country's labor market and the problems of segregation and prejudice they confronted.

10 thoughts on “East Los Angeles: History of a Barrio

  1. David Groves David Groves says:

    Although this book is solid and really is a must read jam packed with facts and extremely informative the title is misleading It's not about the neighborhoods and stories within the East LA community it's about the social currents and eddies that led to the formation of the barrio called East LA Romo covers the Mexican origins of LA the takeover of the city by Anglos in the late 1840s the fascinating way in which whites subjugated browns to a second class position in the late 19th century and then goes into the seminal period from 1900 1930 when refugees from the Mexican Diaz dictatorship began forming a huge Mexican American community During this period Romo examines how Mexicans moved into the various East LA neighborhoods where they settled and what the racial makeup was of the different neighborhoods He pretty much stops at 1930 however except for a uick afterword in which he briskly covers the years 1930 1975Romo goes into great detail about the employment opportunities of the Mexican worker what they could do for a living and what they were barred from doing This is fascinating Rather than being paid by job description they were paid by race Chinese received than Mexicans for example for the same work Romo breaks down the number of white collar Mexicans only about 6% depending on the year sole proprietors and unskilled laborers about 70% depending on the year He uotes one businessman on the common belief among whites that Mexicans were thought of like horses or mules than people who could learn job skills Other topics covered in great detail include discrimination prejudice nativism assimilation and AmericanizationThroughout the book Romo goes into great detail certainly than most people would want in backing up his conclusions This book has numbers numbers and numbers This must delight academics into the next millennium And if you want to get into the weeds on for example specific jobs as my cousin wants to this book is for you Her grandfather for example ran a grocery store in the Rampart area in the 1920s and this book expresses exactly how rare an accomplishment that was Only about 6% of Mexicans were business owners Romo tells us and many of those were grocers as he was He also goes into detail about my own grandparents' various occupations including railroad workers fruit pickers meat packers ditch diggers brickmakers painters and the like I wanted to know about the different neighborhoods in East LA and to learn how Boyle Heights differed from Belvedere Maravilla Lincoln Heights and other sections I wanted to know about the nightclubs grocery stores and barber shops I wanted to get the flavor of the streets I wanted to taste the tamales kreplach and grits from their own respective ethnic groups I wanted to learn about the political organizations and how they ranted Alas there was little of thatif you're looking for facts and statistics that nail down excellent conclusions this is it It's an academic work most of all with everything documented In the footnotes for example I discovered a source that I would have never known existed a Mexican consulate report from 1926 27 Who would have thought to look at the Mexican consulate for retrievable documents? This is why I had to read it a second time This is not a book to skim or even to check out of a library because you'll want to spend time with it reading sections setting it aside remembering what you read piecing it together with other sets of knowledge and then rereading and fixing it in place in your head This is how a reader comes to really know a subject by incorporating it into their minds step by step and in various ways This book was an early work by an academic who is now president of the University of Texas at San Antonio How America has changed

  2. Janet Janet says:

    workmanlike But it is from 1983

  3. Andrea Andrea says:

    A foundational book really in the effort to reclaim a history where what little had been written had all but been erased Also a key book on the early history of East Los Angeles this is great if you're looking for empirical data a historical overview or a summary of what had been written to date You can tell that this is a beginning a book to open up the conversation to start a research ball rolling on the history of the Californios Mexicanos Chicanos of East Los It's enough to get you excited to read to dig into what the local papers were actually covering what the pachucos were really all about and the racism of the riots how in the hell the US government was able to deport over 100000 people to Mexico and the how presence of such a large and vibrant community goes all but unnoticed in everything but the scare literature with people like Fogelson making ridiculous racist remarks into the 1960s It's an overview a taster with solid empirical evidence on population and occupation that is needed to take scholarship to the next level Which is where I'm heading

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *