Paperback è The Orchestra PDF/EPUB Þ

Paperback è The Orchestra PDF/EPUB Þ


The Orchestra ✅ The Orchestra PDF / Epub ⚣ Author D. Kern Holoman – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk In this Very Short Introduction D Kern Holoman considers the structure roots and day to day functioning of the modern philharmonic society He explores topics ranging from the life of a musician in a m In this Very Short Introduction D Kern Holoman considers the structure roots and day to day functioning of the modern philharmonic society He explores topics ranging from the life of a musician in a modern orchestra the recent wave of new hall construction from Berlin to Birmingham threats of bankruptcies and strikes and the eyebrow raising salaries of conductors and general managers At the heart of the book lies a troubling pair of uestions Can such a seemingly anachronistic organization long survive Does the symphony matter in contemporary culture Holoman responds to both with a resounding yes He shows that The Orchestra remains a potent political and social force a cultural diplomat par excellence It has adapted well to the digital revolution and it continues to be seen as an essential element of civic pride In a time of upheaval in how classical music is created heard distributed and evaluated The Orchestra has managed to retain its historic role as a meeting place of intellectual currents an ongoing forum for public enlightenment.

  • Paperback
  • 168 pages
  • The Orchestra
  • D. Kern Holoman
  • English
  • 15 April 2015
  • 9780199760282

About the Author: D. Kern Holoman

Dallas Kern Holoman is an American musicologist and conductor particularly known for his scholarship on the life and works of Hector Berlioz He is Distinguished Professor of Music emeritus at the University of California Davis and Conductor emeritus of the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra.



10 thoughts on “The Orchestra

  1. Darwin8u Darwin8u says:

    without music life would be a mistake Fredrich Nietzsche uoted in The Orchestra A VSII didn't grow up listening to classical music but orchestral music grew on my in college as I bought cheap Naxos sets while still mainly fixated on alternative and punk rock I continued to deepen my appreciation for the form however slowly year after year Most recent years find me attending one or two concerts This year next week actually I'm flying out to LA with my wife to see Dudamel and the LA Philharmonic perform Mahler's 9th There is something about seeing an orchestra peform a piece by Mahler Beethoven Mozart Brahams etc that is hard to capture in a CD or vinyl reproductionThat said this has also been a perfect time to collect CDs of classical music You can buy cheap wonderful pressings of the classical repertoire I pick up almost weekly at Goodwill or other 2nd hand stores Sony Deutsche Grammophon RCA Victor Archiv Decca London Classics etc for 1 3 a cd practically unlistened toThis book reads almost like David Byrne's How Music Works but for the Orchestra Holoman describes the history politics money art venues conductors and music of orchestral music As a lover of the orchestra it was entertaining and enlightening Nothing came as a shock but it put a lot in historical and musical perspective and reminded me both how dynamic and new orchestral music as currently structured really is

  2. Daniel Wright Daniel Wright says:

    Among the various interesting things I have learnt over the last few days reading this is very little about any actual music disappointingly On the other hand it is reasonably clear and easy to read at least by the usual dire standards of art musicChapter 1 PhilharmoniaChapter 2 MusiciansChapter 3 VenueChapter 4 MoneyChapter 5 ConductorsChapter 6 RepertoireChapter 7 CommentaryChapter 8 RecordingsChapter 9 PeaceConclusion Civics

  3. Sam Sam says:

    Somehow OUP published hundreds of titles in the Very Short Introduction series without my having noticed until now You want a book like this to be short sure but also pleasant to read informative and subtly opinionated This was all of those

  4. Tomasz Tomasz says:

    This should have been titled The Orchestra chiefly in America It's not very bad it's just unbalanced Surprisingly United States are not the centre of the world in classical music

  5. Philippe Philippe says:

    Dr Kern Holoman's very short introduction to the symphony orchestra opens a multi faceted and insightful window on one of the most mysterious institutions to have graced the modern era Admittedly the book has been written with a fairly strong North American bias but that doesn't detract from its value for European readers Many of the challenges befalling contemporary orchestras are shared the world over The book falls into ten chapters Philharmonia the history of the orchestra as an institution Musicians financial reward unionization gender and race Venue the concert hall as fixture of the classical music universe Money pay the role of agents star soloists and conductors the economics of orchestra management Conductors history role practice Repertoire programming trends commissions HIP Commentary music criticism and its demise outreach and education Recordings broadcasting and recording the recording industry and its collapse new technology Peace connections between music and politics WWII Cold War Palestine Israel pacifism Civics reinventing the philharmonic idealObviously the motto theme woven into Holoman's discussion is a reflection on the future of the symphony orchestra The 'great symphonic boom' fizzled in the 1980s under pressure of economic demographic and cultural drivers Orchestras need to reinvent themselves to justify their large operating budgets to philanthropic and governmental grant givers It is also clear from this book that there is no silver bullet The philharmonic ideal that joins musicians financial backers and listeners in an alliance that reflects civic pride in local talent and timeless musical heritage will have to be rediscovered and re embodied There have been few genuine success stories in recent times The Los Angeles Philharmonic under the leadership of Deborah Borda is one notable example of a successful rebirth of an orchestra According to the visionary conductor Ivan Fischer time is running out The 100 strong heavily institutionalized orchestra has perhaps two or three decades to live By then it will either have shrunk to a very small niche with a museum like mission of conserving heritage or it will have reinvented itself as a hub of civic life

  6. Bob Anderson Bob Anderson says:

    I had meant to read Leonard Bernstein’s wonderful Childrens’ Concerts book as my work by a musician but realized too late that my preferred method of playing and listening along would take time than I had left in the year Enter this book which I read on NYE I hadn’t expected much from it other than brevity but was pleasantly surprised when I got a smattering of different histories of the orchestra all competently written Holoman covers the economic artistic cultural musical architectural and political aspects of these organizations in a really eye opening way I especially enjoyed how he uses cross border performances pre WW1 and in the Cold War to explore and combat the notion that shared arts cultures can actually lead to peace rather than mere temporary goodwill

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10 thoughts on “The Orchestra

  1. Darwin8u Darwin8u says:

    without music life would be a mistake Fredrich Nietzsche uoted in The Orchestra A VSII didn't grow up listening to classical music but orchestral music grew on my in college as I bought cheap Naxos sets while still mainly fixated on alternative and punk rock I continued to deepen my appreciation for the form however slowly year after year Most recent years find me attending one or two concerts This year next week actually I'm flying out to LA with my wife to see Dudamel and the LA Philharmonic perform Mahler's 9th There is something about seeing an orchestra peform a piece by Mahler Beethoven Mozart Brahams etc that is hard to capture in a CD or vinyl reproductionThat said this has also been a perfect time to collect CDs of classical music You can buy cheap wonderful pressings of the classical repertoire I pick up almost weekly at Goodwill or other 2nd hand stores Sony Deutsche Grammophon RCA Victor Archiv Decca London Classics etc for 1 3 a cd practically unlistened toThis book reads almost like David Byrne's How Music Works but for the Orchestra Holoman describes the history politics money art venues conductors and music of orchestral music As a lover of the orchestra it was entertaining and enlightening Nothing came as a shock but it put a lot in historical and musical perspective and reminded me both how dynamic and new orchestral music as currently structured really is

  2. Daniel Wright Daniel Wright says:

    Among the various interesting things I have learnt over the last few days reading this is very little about any actual music disappointingly On the other hand it is reasonably clear and easy to read at least by the usual dire standards of art musicChapter 1 PhilharmoniaChapter 2 MusiciansChapter 3 VenueChapter 4 MoneyChapter 5 ConductorsChapter 6 RepertoireChapter 7 CommentaryChapter 8 RecordingsChapter 9 PeaceConclusion Civics

  3. Sam Sam says:

    Somehow OUP published hundreds of titles in the Very Short Introduction series without my having noticed until now You want a book like this to be short sure but also pleasant to read informative and subtly opinionated This was all of those

  4. Tomasz Tomasz says:

    This should have been titled The Orchestra chiefly in America It's not very bad it's just unbalanced Surprisingly United States are not the centre of the world in classical music

  5. Philippe Philippe says:

    Dr Kern Holoman's very short introduction to the symphony orchestra opens a multi faceted and insightful window on one of the most mysterious institutions to have graced the modern era Admittedly the book has been written with a fairly strong North American bias but that doesn't detract from its value for European readers Many of the challenges befalling contemporary orchestras are shared the world over The book falls into ten chapters Philharmonia the history of the orchestra as an institution Musicians financial reward unionization gender and race Venue the concert hall as fixture of the classical music universe Money pay the role of agents star soloists and conductors the economics of orchestra management Conductors history role practice Repertoire programming trends commissions HIP Commentary music criticism and its demise outreach and education Recordings broadcasting and recording the recording industry and its collapse new technology Peace connections between music and politics WWII Cold War Palestine Israel pacifism Civics reinventing the philharmonic idealObviously the motto theme woven into Holoman's discussion is a reflection on the future of the symphony orchestra The 'great symphonic boom' fizzled in the 1980s under pressure of economic demographic and cultural drivers Orchestras need to reinvent themselves to justify their large operating budgets to philanthropic and governmental grant givers It is also clear from this book that there is no silver bullet The philharmonic ideal that joins musicians financial backers and listeners in an alliance that reflects civic pride in local talent and timeless musical heritage will have to be rediscovered and re embodied There have been few genuine success stories in recent times The Los Angeles Philharmonic under the leadership of Deborah Borda is one notable example of a successful rebirth of an orchestra According to the visionary conductor Ivan Fischer time is running out The 100 strong heavily institutionalized orchestra has perhaps two or three decades to live By then it will either have shrunk to a very small niche with a museum like mission of conserving heritage or it will have reinvented itself as a hub of civic life

  6. Bob Anderson Bob Anderson says:

    I had meant to read Leonard Bernstein’s wonderful Childrens’ Concerts book as my work by a musician but realized too late that my preferred method of playing and listening along would take time than I had left in the year Enter this book which I read on NYE I hadn’t expected much from it other than brevity but was pleasantly surprised when I got a smattering of different histories of the orchestra all competently written Holoman covers the economic artistic cultural musical architectural and political aspects of these organizations in a really eye opening way I especially enjoyed how he uses cross border performances pre WW1 and in the Cold War to explore and combat the notion that shared arts cultures can actually lead to peace rather than mere temporary goodwill

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