Hey Charleston Epub Þ Hardcover

Hey Charleston Epub Þ Hardcover

Hey Charleston ☃ Hey Charleston PDF / Epub ✑ Author Anne Rockwell – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk What happened when a former slave took beat up old instruments and gave them to a bunch of orphans Thousands of futures got a little brighter and a great American art form was born In 1891 Reverend Da What happened when a former slave took beat up old instruments and gave them to a bunch of orphans Thousands of futures got a little brighter and a great American art form was born In Reverend Daniel Joseph Jenkins opened his orphanage in Charleston South Carolina He soon had hundreds of children and needed a way to support them Jenkins asked townspeople to donate old band instruments some of which had last played in the hands of Confederate soldiers in the Civil War He found teachers to show the kids how to play Soon the orphanage had a band And what a band it wasThe Jenkins Orphanage Band caused a sensation on the streets of Charleston People called the band's style of music rag a rhythm inspired by the African American people who lived on the South Carolina and Georgia coast The children performed as far away as Paris and London and they earned enough money to support the orphanage that still exists today.


10 thoughts on “Hey Charleston

  1. Lisa Lisa says:

    The orphans of Charleston needed a hero and they found one in the good Reverend This documented story makes for excellent historical fiction describing a community leader the birth of a musical phenomenon and opens the door for extended discussion and even researchThere were many things I didn't know about when I picked this book up at my local public library I didn't know about the cultural groups of South Carolina I didn't know about the birth of Jazz and how many diverse experiences throughout the US built an American music form I didn't know about Orphan Bands or their international notorietyI appreciate the storytelling in this book because the essence of the tale comes alive I'll pair this with early Jazz music and some Africa music as well to help listeners understand the full scope of this story I see many possibilities for many different ages with this book Anne Rockwell has written a story that makes a strong care for use of picture books with any age of learner High School libraries need picture books too The illustrations are just an added bonus for a beautiful book


  2. Betsy Betsy says:

    Awesome book Fascinating story of cultural and historical significance A must read especially for my 3rd graders who study SC history


  3. Annie Annie says:

    I'm definitely going to be sharing this book with second graders and pair it with some sweet ragtime music There is a Jenkins Orphanage Band video on Youtube


  4. Book Preview Review Book Preview Review says:

    Book Description“What happened when a former slave took beat up old instruments and gave them to a bunch of orphans? Thousands of futures got a little brighter and a great American art form was born In 1891 Reverend Daniel Joseph Jenkins opened his orphanage in Charleston South Carolina He soon had hundreds of children and needed a way to support them Jenkins asked townspeople to donate old band instruments—some of which had last played in the hands of Confederate soldiers in the Civil War He found teachers to show the kids how to play Soon the orphanage had a band And what a band it was The Jenkins Orphanage Band caused a sensation on the streets of Charleston People called the band's style of music rag—a rhythm inspired by the African American people who lived on the South Carolina and Georgia coast The children performed as far away as Paris and London and they earned enough money to support the orphanage that still exists today They also helped launch the music we now know as jazz Hey Charleston is the story of the kind man who gave America some rag and so much ”A very informative and engaging read geared for elementary and middle schoolers but certainly interesting and entertaining enough for adults as well with beautifully talented illustrationsAn important read for any classroom with an excellent example of the age old saying “turning something into nothing” or turning bad into good a theme worth repeating over and over again for all to learn and live by


  5. Teresa Bateman Teresa Bateman says:

    Extraordinary Heart touching Thought provoking It's hard to find words that do this book justice In 1891 Charleston South Carolina had a problem with orphans Reverend Jenkins started taking in these homeless African American kids His church was soon full so he went to the city who gave him an old warehouse and 100 Soon his boys were drowning out the noise from the prison next door with music they played on donated instruments Thus was born the Jenkins Orphanage Band They spread ragtime music wherever they went and helped inspire a dance craze the Charleston Soon there was than one band and non orphans wanted in on the music The band was in London in 1914 when WWI began They had tickets on a boat home but many other Americans were not so fortunate Reverend Jenkins showed the same generosity of spirit he had when he took in orphans using the band's profits to buy tickets for fellow Americans one of whom was on the council that gave him the original 100 When they got to the New York harbor instruments were pulled out music filled the air and people danced on the decks This is an inspiring bit of history well told and with gorgeous illustrations by Colin Bootman Buy it now it's going to be on a lot of awards lists


  6. Emilia P Emilia P says:

    Is there a particular genre of semi feel good really beautifully lushly illustrated adaptations of important moments in African American history for kids picture books? I suppose this is a member of said genre and it is lovely The story of a South Carolinian Orphanage that ended up introducing America and beyond to the joys of big band jazz and sparked that wonderful dance The Charleston The story is pretty simple and Rockwell doesn't try to over inundate you with every detail but expresses plenty in the stories of trips to New York City and England right before World War I It really makes you want to learn about the music and the kids who brought it to the world And the illustrations every page is muralistic or even monumental in its frozen beauty Some pages look like impressionistic snapshots of 1910s and some look like they belong on a national monument they are so simple and iconic It's a really good way to make the story memorable you can almost hear echoes of jazz melodies of old rising up from the pagesNetgalley graciously provided this I'd like to read of Rockwell's stuff when I get back to the good old US of A


  7. S Farneth S Farneth says:

    I loved this book Anne Rockwell proves that picture books can be informative and instructive and a great way to teach history Did you ever wonder how the dance of the 1920’s the Charleston got its name? Hey Charleston Traces the dance back to 1891 when Reverend Jenkins needed to raise funds for an orphanage he had started Using donated instruments many of which were used by soldiers during the civil War he organized the Orphanage BandHe found teachers to instruct the children and the band grew into a world renowned band playing what became known as “rag” music – a rhythm and beat drawn from the music of the former slaves of the South Carolina coast and islands The children performed in London and Paris; they performed at Theodore Roosevelt’s inauguration and before King George VThe story is a wonderful example of doing what is right turning bad into good and thinking of others’ before yourself Historical stories like this should be told and not forgotten By telling the story through a picture book Rockwell keeps the importance of our history alive and put it in the hands of our children who need to know


  8. Carol Carol says:

    This is a fascinating non fiction picture book about the beginning of Rag music It all started with a pastor of a small church in Charleston The tender hearted man began taking in orphans and caring for them He cared for them and taught them to care for themselves The group outgrew his home and they found an old warehouse that was turned into an orphanage The only problem was the prison next door The prisoners were loud and vulgar which was not the examples the pastor wanted for his charges His decision to teach the boys music may have seemed like a small and rather insignificant thing but it would change the course of all of their lives in a major way It also would have a lasting influence in the world of music as well This beautifully illustrated book is sure to get some attention when awards are being handed out this year


  9. Angie Angie says:

    This was a terrific easy read I will definitely use it in my classroom when discussing the 1920's It could also be a good lead in to Discussion of Germany's unrestricted submarine warfare at the start of World War I I have never heard this bit of history


  10. Edward Sullivan Edward Sullivan says:

    A great story about a little known piece of music history


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “Hey Charleston

  1. Lisa Lisa says:

    The orphans of Charleston needed a hero and they found one in the good Reverend This documented story makes for excellent historical fiction describing a community leader the birth of a musical phenomenon and opens the door for extended discussion and even researchThere were many things I didn't know about when I picked this book up at my local public library I didn't know about the cultural groups of South Carolina I didn't know about the birth of Jazz and how many diverse experiences throughout the US built an American music form I didn't know about Orphan Bands or their international notorietyI appreciate the storytelling in this book because the essence of the tale comes alive I'll pair this with early Jazz music and some Africa music as well to help listeners understand the full scope of this story I see many possibilities for many different ages with this book Anne Rockwell has written a story that makes a strong care for use of picture books with any age of learner High School libraries need picture books too The illustrations are just an added bonus for a beautiful book

  2. Betsy Betsy says:

    Awesome book Fascinating story of cultural and historical significance A must read especially for my 3rd graders who study SC history

  3. Annie Annie says:

    I'm definitely going to be sharing this book with second graders and pair it with some sweet ragtime music There is a Jenkins Orphanage Band video on Youtube

  4. Book Preview Review Book Preview Review says:

    Book Description“What happened when a former slave took beat up old instruments and gave them to a bunch of orphans? Thousands of futures got a little brighter and a great American art form was born In 1891 Reverend Daniel Joseph Jenkins opened his orphanage in Charleston South Carolina He soon had hundreds of children and needed a way to support them Jenkins asked townspeople to donate old band instruments—some of which had last played in the hands of Confederate soldiers in the Civil War He found teachers to show the kids how to play Soon the orphanage had a band And what a band it was The Jenkins Orphanage Band caused a sensation on the streets of Charleston People called the band's style of music rag—a rhythm inspired by the African American people who lived on the South Carolina and Georgia coast The children performed as far away as Paris and London and they earned enough money to support the orphanage that still exists today They also helped launch the music we now know as jazz Hey Charleston is the story of the kind man who gave America some rag and so much ”A very informative and engaging read geared for elementary and middle schoolers but certainly interesting and entertaining enough for adults as well with beautifully talented illustrationsAn important read for any classroom with an excellent example of the age old saying “turning something into nothing” or turning bad into good a theme worth repeating over and over again for all to learn and live by

  5. Teresa Bateman Teresa Bateman says:

    Extraordinary Heart touching Thought provoking It's hard to find words that do this book justice In 1891 Charleston South Carolina had a problem with orphans Reverend Jenkins started taking in these homeless African American kids His church was soon full so he went to the city who gave him an old warehouse and 100 Soon his boys were drowning out the noise from the prison next door with music they played on donated instruments Thus was born the Jenkins Orphanage Band They spread ragtime music wherever they went and helped inspire a dance craze the Charleston Soon there was than one band and non orphans wanted in on the music The band was in London in 1914 when WWI began They had tickets on a boat home but many other Americans were not so fortunate Reverend Jenkins showed the same generosity of spirit he had when he took in orphans using the band's profits to buy tickets for fellow Americans one of whom was on the council that gave him the original 100 When they got to the New York harbor instruments were pulled out music filled the air and people danced on the decks This is an inspiring bit of history well told and with gorgeous illustrations by Colin Bootman Buy it now it's going to be on a lot of awards lists

  6. Emilia P Emilia P says:

    Is there a particular genre of semi feel good really beautifully lushly illustrated adaptations of important moments in African American history for kids picture books? I suppose this is a member of said genre and it is lovely The story of a South Carolinian Orphanage that ended up introducing America and beyond to the joys of big band jazz and sparked that wonderful dance The Charleston The story is pretty simple and Rockwell doesn't try to over inundate you with every detail but expresses plenty in the stories of trips to New York City and England right before World War I It really makes you want to learn about the music and the kids who brought it to the world And the illustrations every page is muralistic or even monumental in its frozen beauty Some pages look like impressionistic snapshots of 1910s and some look like they belong on a national monument they are so simple and iconic It's a really good way to make the story memorable you can almost hear echoes of jazz melodies of old rising up from the pagesNetgalley graciously provided this I'd like to read of Rockwell's stuff when I get back to the good old US of A

  7. S Farneth S Farneth says:

    I loved this book Anne Rockwell proves that picture books can be informative and instructive and a great way to teach history Did you ever wonder how the dance of the 1920’s the Charleston got its name? Hey Charleston Traces the dance back to 1891 when Reverend Jenkins needed to raise funds for an orphanage he had started Using donated instruments many of which were used by soldiers during the civil War he organized the Orphanage BandHe found teachers to instruct the children and the band grew into a world renowned band playing what became known as “rag” music – a rhythm and beat drawn from the music of the former slaves of the South Carolina coast and islands The children performed in London and Paris; they performed at Theodore Roosevelt’s inauguration and before King George VThe story is a wonderful example of doing what is right turning bad into good and thinking of others’ before yourself Historical stories like this should be told and not forgotten By telling the story through a picture book Rockwell keeps the importance of our history alive and put it in the hands of our children who need to know

  8. Carol Carol says:

    This is a fascinating non fiction picture book about the beginning of Rag music It all started with a pastor of a small church in Charleston The tender hearted man began taking in orphans and caring for them He cared for them and taught them to care for themselves The group outgrew his home and they found an old warehouse that was turned into an orphanage The only problem was the prison next door The prisoners were loud and vulgar which was not the examples the pastor wanted for his charges His decision to teach the boys music may have seemed like a small and rather insignificant thing but it would change the course of all of their lives in a major way It also would have a lasting influence in the world of music as well This beautifully illustrated book is sure to get some attention when awards are being handed out this year

  9. Angie Angie says:

    This was a terrific easy read I will definitely use it in my classroom when discussing the 1920's It could also be a good lead in to Discussion of Germany's unrestricted submarine warfare at the start of World War I I have never heard this bit of history

  10. Edward Sullivan Edward Sullivan says:

    A great story about a little known piece of music history

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *