World of Ham Radio 1901 1950 A Social History Epub ç

World of Ham Radio 1901 1950 A Social History Epub ç



10 thoughts on “World of Ham Radio 1901 1950 A Social History

  1. Dennis Williams Dennis Williams says:

    Good intro to ham radio historyI'm a professional American historian and have been for about twenty five years I'm a rank amateur licensed ham Naturally as I have just begun getting my feet wet on 20 and 40 meters I sought to understand the culture of my new hobby Richard Bartlett's book was a great place to start Bartlett used the ARRL ST magazine as a key resource for tracing the social history of ham radio from its technological inception by Marconi and Tesla through the early days of competing associations and the triumph of the ARRL under the leadership of Percy Hyram Maxim to the renowned utility of amateur radio service in the face of natural disaster and war What stands out is the recurring themes related to protecting amateur freuencies against competing commercial interests the importance of demonstrating relevance to officials and the populace and the triumphal narrative of amateur determination to successfully turn sows ears into silk pursesTwo negatives are worth noting First the jumping back and forth chronologically between chapters not uncommon in thematically organized histories is a bit jarring at times Second I have a hard time accepting Barlett's claim that their is nothing new to be known in terms of ham radio social history after 1950 He concludes that only technological changes are worth investigating at that point Certainly the FCC's regulatory structure hammered out in the 1930s and the willingness of Hams to agree to self regulate shapes ham culture I suspect there has been a lot of cultural continuity driven by the role played by the Great Generation and the Baby boomers and yet if the culture of computer integrated and software defined radio experimentation often maligned by the boat anchor set has not spawned distinctive cultural developments through the Cold War and beyond then perhaps it is a hobbyists terminal stage I hope not Bartlett's claim is I suspect a natural outgrowth of his nostalgic review conditioned by his own 70 years of personal experience as a hamThose are minor points This is a great place to start if you want to understand the history and culture of radio amateurs in a glorious period of amateur inventiveness in American history


  2. Mac McCormick III Mac McCormick III says:

    There don't seem to be many books written about the history of amateur radio so I was enthused when I came across this book on If you are looking for a technical history of amateur radio something that details what was being built with what component or a timeline of technological changes then as the title suggests this book is what you're looking for Bartlett has written a social organizational and operational history of amateur radio Although the title doesn't indicate it you will probably want to keep in mind that it is for the most part a history of amateur radio in the United States Amateur radio in other countries is for the most part only mentioned in relationship to amateur radio in the United States and in involvement in world regulatory meetings What I enjoyed about this book is that it isn't so much about amateur radio itself but about amateur radio operators the hams Perhaps Bartlett put it best himself in the IntroductionThis book unabashedly praises the amateurs the hams It traces their first fifty years with emphasis on their social history Technological changes are kept to a minimumThe author's brother Forrest A Bartlett 1914 2006 was a ham W6OWP He was the inspiration for The World of Ham Radio 1900 1950 A Social History W6OWP's life as a ham saw a great deal of change in the hobby from almost the earliest days through it's formative period and through a great many regulatory and organizational periods so the author Richard A Bartlett was able to see the evolution of amateur radio through his brother's eyes The World of Ham Radio chronicles the earliest days of radio and the involvement of Hiram Percy Maxim and the formation of the American Radio Relay League ARRL before going into how Amateur Radio survived World War I While the great technological advances made between the World Wars are mentioned the books shows how the years in between the wars also saw amateur radio strengthen organizationally become established with regulations worldwide gain attention and popularity and show what radio could do to benefit the community in emergencies and help advance exploration and knowledge With the coming of World War II the book shows how the hobby and hams helped the war effort how amateur radio operators helped out both in the military and the home front and finally shows how the hobby strengthened in the post war years Bartlett does this by telling the stories of amateur radio operators who participated in emergency services aiding their communities who took part in and joined in expeditions exploring various parts of the globe and who joined the military and served the community at home A major character in the book is the ARRL itself; some might say that it overly praises the ARRL but the part the ARRL played in protecting the hobby from threat during its formative years and the years between WW1 and WW2 cannot be denied Although we may not agree with everything they do or all of the positions they take the ARRL continues that mission today In essence Bartlett has not just told the story of amateur radio in the United States he has told how amateur radio and amateur radio operators interacted with the community around the hobby and most importantly how it had a positive impact on the community around itThere is a genuine fascination for us on any old night when we marvel of our ability to sit in a half darkened room before a little collection of instruments with the audions dimly glowing and hear the messages from our friends come buzzing in the through the nightThat line from The World of Ham Radio helps explain the allure of the hobby The radios I operate may not have glowing audions tubes but it still amazes me that I can sit at my radios and talk to folks from across town or the other side of the globe without them being sitting with me or without wires connecting us That excitement all of us hams have of using the airwaves is conveyed by Bartlett in this book and he does a pretty good job of it If you're an amateur radio operator and want to know how the hobby began established itself and grew then this is the book for you I think it does a good job of telling the story without being overly technical or getting bogged down in the jargon of the hobby so if you're not a ham and are curious about the hobby then this is the book for you as well


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World of Ham Radio 1901 1950 A Social History ✅ World of Ham Radio 1901 1950 A Social History PDF / Epub ⚣ Author Richard A. Bartlett – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk During the first fifty years of the twentieth century ham radio went from being an experiment to virtually an art form Because of the few government restrictions and the low monetary investment reuire Ham Radio Epub Ü During the first fifty years of the twentieth century ham radio went from being an experiment to virtually an art form Because of the World of PDF/EPUB ² few government restrictions and the low monetary investment reuired the concept of ham radio of Ham Radio 1901 1950 PDF \ appealed to various people More than just a simple hobby however of Ham Radio PDF/EPUB ë ham radio reuired its operators to understand radio theory be able to trace a schematic and know how to build a transmitter and receiver with of Ham Radio 1901 1950 PDF \ whatever material they might have available With the advent of World War II and the increased need for cutting edge communications the United States government drew upon the considerable knowledge and skill of these amateur ham radio operators validating the fact that ham radio was here to stay This book explores the history of ham radio operators emphasizing their social history and their many contributions to the technological development of worldwide.

10 thoughts on “World of Ham Radio 1901 1950 A Social History

  1. Dennis Williams Dennis Williams says:

    Good intro to ham radio historyI'm a professional American historian and have been for about twenty five years I'm a rank amateur licensed ham Naturally as I have just begun getting my feet wet on 20 and 40 meters I sought to understand the culture of my new hobby Richard Bartlett's book was a great place to start Bartlett used the ARRL ST magazine as a key resource for tracing the social history of ham radio from its technological inception by Marconi and Tesla through the early days of competing associations and the triumph of the ARRL under the leadership of Percy Hyram Maxim to the renowned utility of amateur radio service in the face of natural disaster and war What stands out is the recurring themes related to protecting amateur freuencies against competing commercial interests the importance of demonstrating relevance to officials and the populace and the triumphal narrative of amateur determination to successfully turn sows ears into silk pursesTwo negatives are worth noting First the jumping back and forth chronologically between chapters not uncommon in thematically organized histories is a bit jarring at times Second I have a hard time accepting Barlett's claim that their is nothing new to be known in terms of ham radio social history after 1950 He concludes that only technological changes are worth investigating at that point Certainly the FCC's regulatory structure hammered out in the 1930s and the willingness of Hams to agree to self regulate shapes ham culture I suspect there has been a lot of cultural continuity driven by the role played by the Great Generation and the Baby boomers and yet if the culture of computer integrated and software defined radio experimentation often maligned by the boat anchor set has not spawned distinctive cultural developments through the Cold War and beyond then perhaps it is a hobbyists terminal stage I hope not Bartlett's claim is I suspect a natural outgrowth of his nostalgic review conditioned by his own 70 years of personal experience as a hamThose are minor points This is a great place to start if you want to understand the history and culture of radio amateurs in a glorious period of amateur inventiveness in American history

  2. Mac McCormick III Mac McCormick III says:

    There don't seem to be many books written about the history of amateur radio so I was enthused when I came across this book on If you are looking for a technical history of amateur radio something that details what was being built with what component or a timeline of technological changes then as the title suggests this book is what you're looking for Bartlett has written a social organizational and operational history of amateur radio Although the title doesn't indicate it you will probably want to keep in mind that it is for the most part a history of amateur radio in the United States Amateur radio in other countries is for the most part only mentioned in relationship to amateur radio in the United States and in involvement in world regulatory meetings What I enjoyed about this book is that it isn't so much about amateur radio itself but about amateur radio operators the hams Perhaps Bartlett put it best himself in the IntroductionThis book unabashedly praises the amateurs the hams It traces their first fifty years with emphasis on their social history Technological changes are kept to a minimumThe author's brother Forrest A Bartlett 1914 2006 was a ham W6OWP He was the inspiration for The World of Ham Radio 1900 1950 A Social History W6OWP's life as a ham saw a great deal of change in the hobby from almost the earliest days through it's formative period and through a great many regulatory and organizational periods so the author Richard A Bartlett was able to see the evolution of amateur radio through his brother's eyes The World of Ham Radio chronicles the earliest days of radio and the involvement of Hiram Percy Maxim and the formation of the American Radio Relay League ARRL before going into how Amateur Radio survived World War I While the great technological advances made between the World Wars are mentioned the books shows how the years in between the wars also saw amateur radio strengthen organizationally become established with regulations worldwide gain attention and popularity and show what radio could do to benefit the community in emergencies and help advance exploration and knowledge With the coming of World War II the book shows how the hobby and hams helped the war effort how amateur radio operators helped out both in the military and the home front and finally shows how the hobby strengthened in the post war years Bartlett does this by telling the stories of amateur radio operators who participated in emergency services aiding their communities who took part in and joined in expeditions exploring various parts of the globe and who joined the military and served the community at home A major character in the book is the ARRL itself; some might say that it overly praises the ARRL but the part the ARRL played in protecting the hobby from threat during its formative years and the years between WW1 and WW2 cannot be denied Although we may not agree with everything they do or all of the positions they take the ARRL continues that mission today In essence Bartlett has not just told the story of amateur radio in the United States he has told how amateur radio and amateur radio operators interacted with the community around the hobby and most importantly how it had a positive impact on the community around itThere is a genuine fascination for us on any old night when we marvel of our ability to sit in a half darkened room before a little collection of instruments with the audions dimly glowing and hear the messages from our friends come buzzing in the through the nightThat line from The World of Ham Radio helps explain the allure of the hobby The radios I operate may not have glowing audions tubes but it still amazes me that I can sit at my radios and talk to folks from across town or the other side of the globe without them being sitting with me or without wires connecting us That excitement all of us hams have of using the airwaves is conveyed by Bartlett in this book and he does a pretty good job of it If you're an amateur radio operator and want to know how the hobby began established itself and grew then this is the book for you I think it does a good job of telling the story without being overly technical or getting bogged down in the jargon of the hobby so if you're not a ham and are curious about the hobby then this is the book for you as well

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