Ebook ↠ Uncommon Sense PDF Þ

Ebook ↠ Uncommon Sense PDF Þ



10 thoughts on “Uncommon Sense

  1. Ed Erwin Ed Erwin says:

    Gee philosophers have come up with some crazy ideas Also some good ones Particularly from 'material philosophy' and other forms of 'experimental philosophy' but this book focuses on some weird ideas from guys who reach conclusions through pure reason The chapters in the book are brief and somewhat entertaining Just don't believe all the conclusions While all the odd ideas can be supported by logical arguments I suspect they are mostly either wrong or meaningless Using logic is of no use if your starting assumptions are wrong your definitions are circular or your terms are undefinable like 'free will' Using simple math there are many ways to prove that 1 euals 2 but there always turns out to be a mistake somewhere; often dividing by zero or treating 'infinity' like a number rather than a limit Many of the arguments here must have some flaw since they contradict each other animals have no consciousness but humans do Descartes; everything has consciousness Thomas Nagel; consciousness doesn't exist Daniel Dennet only briefly mentioned in this book


  2. robin friedman robin friedman says:

    A Provocative Invitation To PhilosophyAndrew Pessin's recent book Uncommon Sense the Strangest Ideas from the Smartest Philosophers 2012 is less an introduction to philosophy as it might be taught in a college course for freshmen than an invitation to engage in philosophical thinking Pessin is Professor of Philosophy at Connecticut College He has written technical books and papers about philosophy of mind and early modern philosophy together with books such as Uncommon Sense which aim to make philosophy appealing to a broad group of readers Early in Uncommon Sense Pessin defines philosophy as what you get when you begin to actually think about things He elaboratesWhen you begin to think about what's right before your eyes and start to see uestions where you previously assumed there were facts When you begin to think about things in a new way in a bigger way beyond the here and now; when you begin to ask not merely how things really are but why they are why there exists something rather than nothing at all and how we are capable even of knowing that there exists something rather than nothingPessin contrasts philosophical thought to the uncritical unreflective common sense that most people from all times have inherited from their childhood It's what we believe about things when we don't give them much thought Pessin writes In his book Pessin challenges unreflective thinking on a series of varied and mutually inconsistent fronts He takes 18 important philosophical positions offered by 19 different philosophers The last section of the book is a combination of two named philosophers together with others Pessin shows how each of these positions fly in the face or seem to do so of unreflective thought He offers explanations of the problem the philosophical position in uestion was designed to address and of the arguments the philosopher advanced in support of the conclusion Although he drops hints in most instances Pessin does not offer his own opinion of the merits of the position under discussion Rather he articulates the reasons the philosopher advanced and his response to some of the immediate objections before leaving matters at that for the reader to pursue and ponderPessin writes engagingly and collouially with many homey easily understood examples Each chapter is punctuated with short lead in subheadings which hold the reader's interest The argumentative sections of the book tend to be tightly drawn for new readers The style on the whole is provocative in the manner of a gifted teacher who seeks to wake students from what Kant might call their uncritical dogmatic slumbersThe eighteen chapters include some familiar and unfamiliar figures The book generally avoids the temptation to recount the history of philosophy under a new guise It begins with Plato and his theory of Forms and Aristotle The latter philosopher is generally and properly seen as kinder to common sense than his predecessor but Pessin offers an excellent exposition of an early Aristotelian teaching on the nature of logical necessity Next Pessin offers four medieval philosophers Augustine Anselm Maimonides and Auinas exploring various difficult ideas centering on theism I found Pessin's discussion of Anselm's ontological argument for God's existence and of Maimonides' difficult discussion of the eternity of the world the most interesting of this groupNext is a selection of seven early modern philosophers beginning with Descartes that focus on mind body dualism and its conseuences The selection includes many familiar names including Locke Leibniz Berkeley and Hume Pessin also includes Malebranche who is freuently not studied in simple introductions to the modern period and excludes two seminally important figures Spinoza and Kant Spinoza's omission is made up for late in the book Pessin offers good pithy discussions of these founders of modern philosophical thought He captures something of what they about in a short space with the exception of the treatment of Leibniz which I thought abrupt and over simplified Later in the book Pessin ualifies his treatment of LeibnizNext Pessin offers an excellent discussion of the solitary figure of Nietzsche followed by a discussion of the lesser known early 20th Century philosopher John McTaggart whose denial of the existence of time became without Pessin so stating one of the targets of early British analytical philosophy It was probably valuable to introduce McTaggart on time rather than several other philosophers Kant included that Pessin might have usedThe final sections of the book were of most interest to me They included a discussion of Wittgenstein on private languages Hilary Putnam whose thought has changed many times over a distinguished career on meaning David Lewis on the actual existence of possible worlds and Thomas Nagel and David Chalmers on panpsychism and on setting aside mind body dualism Although not so designated the final chapter appears to be something of a summation in which Pessin indicates his own philosophical leanings The chapter briefly draws support from Spinoza who was omitted in the chapters on early modern philosophy and from William James among other thinkers Pessin's discussion moved me to want to read of Lewis whom I have not read and ChalmersWhen thought of as a discipline philosophy differs from say mathematics or chemistry in that the subjects the student learns at the beginning are essentially the same as the subjects the philosopher thinks about after engaging for many years Pessin's book is lively informed and provocative in an appealing way Broader in scope than an introduction to philosophy the book will encourage new readers to think philosophically The book also will challenge readers familiar with philosophical thought and the philosophers that Pessin discussesRobin Friedman


  3. Peter (Pete) Mcloughlin Peter (Pete) Mcloughlin says:

    a short and diverting collection of odd ideas from philosophy Philosophy can often be seen as ridiculous by practical people It has a lot of ideas that fly in the face of common sense I often find people who do not like philosophy also tend not to like science fiction It is the idea of thinking of outlandish scenarios being something rather childish or absent minded I like both but at times I can sympathize with antipathy to idle speculation as much as enjoy it myself when I'm in the mood This book is a collection of outlandish ideas from the history of philosophy invisible worlds of forms real than our world Plato Strange proofs of god Anselm every world in imagination fiction or possible at all really exist somewhere Lewis It is an enjoyable introduction to some strange ideas It may not be good for young person who has a strong practical bent but might be an excellent read for their imaginative or flighty to use a pejorative term sibling I personal like reading this kind of stuff


  4. Alex Alex says:

    I don't like Philosophy but I liked the simplicity of this author's remarksEXTRACTTo Tie it all togetherTo put it all in one place then Anselm's ontological argument looks like thisGod is the greatest conceivable beingGod exists at least in the mindAssume for a moment that God exists only in the mindThen the greatest conceivable being would be one than which a greater CAN be conceivedBut that is a contradiction so that assumption leading to it must be falseTherefore God does not exist only in the mindTherefore God exits in reality too ANSELM


  5. John Condliffe John Condliffe says:

    This was so down to Earth and humorous about many of the profound ideas that have shaped and shaken mankind I devoured it vey uickly then went back for bites of it A book that will change your life or your ideas about it anyway


  6. Phoenix Phoenix says:

    Excursions of the Philosophical Kind Excursions of the Philosophical Kind March 15 2016 This review is from Uncommon Sense The Strangest Ideas from the Smartest Philosophers Hardcover Thoroughly enjoyable Professor Pessin invites us on a tour of 18 noted philosophers and some of their odder ideas Not only are the author's explanations clear but they are placed within the historic aspects of their time and ably contrasted to the arguments they opposeWell written though somewhat esoteric the book should appeal to readers at a university level who either are or have studied the western cannon of philosophy Each chapter begins with a lightly humorous restatement of the odd idea to be covered and a hilited biographical paragraph or two followed by a fuller exploration and a brief set of follow up references In particular I enjoyed Pessin's analysis of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals Ch 13 both for it's own sake and as it illuminated the path for other 20th century philosophers such as Foucault and Derrida to take an etymologicalhistoric approach to uncovering meaning Startling at least to me was Pessin's mention that Aristotle's opinion Ch 2 though he could not prove it that his Principle of Bivalence the notion that everything is either true or false did not apply to future events as they were unknowable which had Augustine Ch 3 taken into account might have resolved his conflict with free will and God's omniscience Also intriguing was chapter 5 on Maimonides who marshaled the philosophical arguments of those who came before him on the issue of whether or not the universe had a beginning concluding that while it was unprovableOne doesn't have to agree with the arguments given For example Nagel and Chalmers endorsement of pan psychism Ch 18 that every element of the universe has some degree of consciousness is based largely on the rejection of emergent properties of systems and since living systems have mental states and are composed of matter matter too must have mental states To my mind this is a variation on the sorites paradox at some point there is so little there that the claim no longer holds This is part of the pleasure of Pessin in that he doesn't just present he begins a dialog which readers can continue on their ownFor those with an interest in the philosophy of causality consciousness and knowability an excellent addition to one's shelf


  7. Mills College Library Mills College Library says:

    190 P475 2012


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Uncommon Sense ❰Ebook❯ ➥ Uncommon Sense Author Andrew Pessin – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk In Uncommon Sense Andrew Pessin leads us on an entertaining tour of philosophy explaining the pivotal moments when the greatest minds solved some of the knottiest conundrums by asserting some very str In Uncommon Sense Andrew Pessin leads us on an entertaining tour of philosophy explaining the pivotal moments when the greatest minds solved some of the knottiest conundrums by asserting some very strange things But the great philosophers don't merely make unusual claims they offer powerful arguments for those claims that you can't easily dismiss And these arguments suggest that the world is much stranger than you could have imagined You neither will nor won't do certain things in the future like wear your blue shirt tomorrowBut your blue shirt isn't really blue because colors don't exist in physical objects; they're only in your mindTime is an illusionYour thoughts are not inside your headEverything you believe about morality is falseAnimals don't have mindsThere is no physical world at allIn eighteen lively intelligent chapters spanning the ancient Greeks and contemporary thinkers Pessin examines the most unusual ideas how they have influenced the course of Western thought and why despite being so odd they just might be correct Here is popular philosophy at its finest sure to entertain as it enlightens CHOICE.

10 thoughts on “Uncommon Sense

  1. Ed Erwin Ed Erwin says:

    Gee philosophers have come up with some crazy ideas Also some good ones Particularly from 'material philosophy' and other forms of 'experimental philosophy' but this book focuses on some weird ideas from guys who reach conclusions through pure reason The chapters in the book are brief and somewhat entertaining Just don't believe all the conclusions While all the odd ideas can be supported by logical arguments I suspect they are mostly either wrong or meaningless Using logic is of no use if your starting assumptions are wrong your definitions are circular or your terms are undefinable like 'free will' Using simple math there are many ways to prove that 1 euals 2 but there always turns out to be a mistake somewhere; often dividing by zero or treating 'infinity' like a number rather than a limit Many of the arguments here must have some flaw since they contradict each other animals have no consciousness but humans do Descartes; everything has consciousness Thomas Nagel; consciousness doesn't exist Daniel Dennet only briefly mentioned in this book

  2. robin friedman robin friedman says:

    A Provocative Invitation To PhilosophyAndrew Pessin's recent book Uncommon Sense the Strangest Ideas from the Smartest Philosophers 2012 is less an introduction to philosophy as it might be taught in a college course for freshmen than an invitation to engage in philosophical thinking Pessin is Professor of Philosophy at Connecticut College He has written technical books and papers about philosophy of mind and early modern philosophy together with books such as Uncommon Sense which aim to make philosophy appealing to a broad group of readers Early in Uncommon Sense Pessin defines philosophy as what you get when you begin to actually think about things He elaboratesWhen you begin to think about what's right before your eyes and start to see uestions where you previously assumed there were facts When you begin to think about things in a new way in a bigger way beyond the here and now; when you begin to ask not merely how things really are but why they are why there exists something rather than nothing at all and how we are capable even of knowing that there exists something rather than nothingPessin contrasts philosophical thought to the uncritical unreflective common sense that most people from all times have inherited from their childhood It's what we believe about things when we don't give them much thought Pessin writes In his book Pessin challenges unreflective thinking on a series of varied and mutually inconsistent fronts He takes 18 important philosophical positions offered by 19 different philosophers The last section of the book is a combination of two named philosophers together with others Pessin shows how each of these positions fly in the face or seem to do so of unreflective thought He offers explanations of the problem the philosophical position in uestion was designed to address and of the arguments the philosopher advanced in support of the conclusion Although he drops hints in most instances Pessin does not offer his own opinion of the merits of the position under discussion Rather he articulates the reasons the philosopher advanced and his response to some of the immediate objections before leaving matters at that for the reader to pursue and ponderPessin writes engagingly and collouially with many homey easily understood examples Each chapter is punctuated with short lead in subheadings which hold the reader's interest The argumentative sections of the book tend to be tightly drawn for new readers The style on the whole is provocative in the manner of a gifted teacher who seeks to wake students from what Kant might call their uncritical dogmatic slumbersThe eighteen chapters include some familiar and unfamiliar figures The book generally avoids the temptation to recount the history of philosophy under a new guise It begins with Plato and his theory of Forms and Aristotle The latter philosopher is generally and properly seen as kinder to common sense than his predecessor but Pessin offers an excellent exposition of an early Aristotelian teaching on the nature of logical necessity Next Pessin offers four medieval philosophers Augustine Anselm Maimonides and Auinas exploring various difficult ideas centering on theism I found Pessin's discussion of Anselm's ontological argument for God's existence and of Maimonides' difficult discussion of the eternity of the world the most interesting of this groupNext is a selection of seven early modern philosophers beginning with Descartes that focus on mind body dualism and its conseuences The selection includes many familiar names including Locke Leibniz Berkeley and Hume Pessin also includes Malebranche who is freuently not studied in simple introductions to the modern period and excludes two seminally important figures Spinoza and Kant Spinoza's omission is made up for late in the book Pessin offers good pithy discussions of these founders of modern philosophical thought He captures something of what they about in a short space with the exception of the treatment of Leibniz which I thought abrupt and over simplified Later in the book Pessin ualifies his treatment of LeibnizNext Pessin offers an excellent discussion of the solitary figure of Nietzsche followed by a discussion of the lesser known early 20th Century philosopher John McTaggart whose denial of the existence of time became without Pessin so stating one of the targets of early British analytical philosophy It was probably valuable to introduce McTaggart on time rather than several other philosophers Kant included that Pessin might have usedThe final sections of the book were of most interest to me They included a discussion of Wittgenstein on private languages Hilary Putnam whose thought has changed many times over a distinguished career on meaning David Lewis on the actual existence of possible worlds and Thomas Nagel and David Chalmers on panpsychism and on setting aside mind body dualism Although not so designated the final chapter appears to be something of a summation in which Pessin indicates his own philosophical leanings The chapter briefly draws support from Spinoza who was omitted in the chapters on early modern philosophy and from William James among other thinkers Pessin's discussion moved me to want to read of Lewis whom I have not read and ChalmersWhen thought of as a discipline philosophy differs from say mathematics or chemistry in that the subjects the student learns at the beginning are essentially the same as the subjects the philosopher thinks about after engaging for many years Pessin's book is lively informed and provocative in an appealing way Broader in scope than an introduction to philosophy the book will encourage new readers to think philosophically The book also will challenge readers familiar with philosophical thought and the philosophers that Pessin discussesRobin Friedman

  3. Peter (Pete) Mcloughlin Peter (Pete) Mcloughlin says:

    a short and diverting collection of odd ideas from philosophy Philosophy can often be seen as ridiculous by practical people It has a lot of ideas that fly in the face of common sense I often find people who do not like philosophy also tend not to like science fiction It is the idea of thinking of outlandish scenarios being something rather childish or absent minded I like both but at times I can sympathize with antipathy to idle speculation as much as enjoy it myself when I'm in the mood This book is a collection of outlandish ideas from the history of philosophy invisible worlds of forms real than our world Plato Strange proofs of god Anselm every world in imagination fiction or possible at all really exist somewhere Lewis It is an enjoyable introduction to some strange ideas It may not be good for young person who has a strong practical bent but might be an excellent read for their imaginative or flighty to use a pejorative term sibling I personal like reading this kind of stuff

  4. Alex Alex says:

    I don't like Philosophy but I liked the simplicity of this author's remarksEXTRACTTo Tie it all togetherTo put it all in one place then Anselm's ontological argument looks like thisGod is the greatest conceivable beingGod exists at least in the mindAssume for a moment that God exists only in the mindThen the greatest conceivable being would be one than which a greater CAN be conceivedBut that is a contradiction so that assumption leading to it must be falseTherefore God does not exist only in the mindTherefore God exits in reality too ANSELM

  5. John Condliffe John Condliffe says:

    This was so down to Earth and humorous about many of the profound ideas that have shaped and shaken mankind I devoured it vey uickly then went back for bites of it A book that will change your life or your ideas about it anyway

  6. Phoenix Phoenix says:

    Excursions of the Philosophical Kind Excursions of the Philosophical Kind March 15 2016 This review is from Uncommon Sense The Strangest Ideas from the Smartest Philosophers Hardcover Thoroughly enjoyable Professor Pessin invites us on a tour of 18 noted philosophers and some of their odder ideas Not only are the author's explanations clear but they are placed within the historic aspects of their time and ably contrasted to the arguments they opposeWell written though somewhat esoteric the book should appeal to readers at a university level who either are or have studied the western cannon of philosophy Each chapter begins with a lightly humorous restatement of the odd idea to be covered and a hilited biographical paragraph or two followed by a fuller exploration and a brief set of follow up references In particular I enjoyed Pessin's analysis of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals Ch 13 both for it's own sake and as it illuminated the path for other 20th century philosophers such as Foucault and Derrida to take an etymologicalhistoric approach to uncovering meaning Startling at least to me was Pessin's mention that Aristotle's opinion Ch 2 though he could not prove it that his Principle of Bivalence the notion that everything is either true or false did not apply to future events as they were unknowable which had Augustine Ch 3 taken into account might have resolved his conflict with free will and God's omniscience Also intriguing was chapter 5 on Maimonides who marshaled the philosophical arguments of those who came before him on the issue of whether or not the universe had a beginning concluding that while it was unprovableOne doesn't have to agree with the arguments given For example Nagel and Chalmers endorsement of pan psychism Ch 18 that every element of the universe has some degree of consciousness is based largely on the rejection of emergent properties of systems and since living systems have mental states and are composed of matter matter too must have mental states To my mind this is a variation on the sorites paradox at some point there is so little there that the claim no longer holds This is part of the pleasure of Pessin in that he doesn't just present he begins a dialog which readers can continue on their ownFor those with an interest in the philosophy of causality consciousness and knowability an excellent addition to one's shelf

  7. Mills College Library Mills College Library says:

    190 P475 2012

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