Challenging Casanova PDF/EPUB Þ Hardcover

Challenging Casanova PDF/EPUB Þ Hardcover

Challenging Casanova ❴Read❵ ➬ Challenging Casanova Author Andrew P. Smiler – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Changing perceptions about male sexualityIn his groundbreaking new book noted expert on teenage and adult masculine behavior Andrew Smiler debunks the myth that teenage boys and young men are barely a Changing perceptions about male sexualityIn his groundbreaking new book noted expert on teenage and adult masculine behavior Andrew Smiler debunks the myth that teenage boys and young men are barely able to control their sex drives which may lead to destructive hyper sexuality unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases Dr Smiler helps us recognize that the majority of boys and men do not fit this stereotype and that boys sexual development is multi faceted He also shows how this shift in attitude could help create young men who are mature and have better relationships with partners and friends Explains how the Casanova Complex has developed over time and how it can hurt young males Provides the latest research on male sexuality including information from the author's own studies Offers guidance for parents and counselors of boys who want to help them develop lasting and meaningful relationships as well as for the parents of girls who are datingThis book dismantles the stereotype of boys as driven only by an obsession with having intercourse with multiple partners and calls for deeper growth and understanding of modern masculinity.


10 thoughts on “Challenging Casanova

  1. Kate Irwin-smiler Kate Irwin-smiler says:

    Ok full disclosure I'm married to the author But I'm not a psychologist I don't study media or gender or anything like that so while I've heard a lot about his work over the years I've never read much of it And I think this book gives a great big picture look at why ways we talk about and treat men especially adolescent men harms them and us as a society Individual instances or characters or products that seem amusing or harmless on their own when seen in the context this book offers are less innocent and scary And I while I've heard so much of the facts and figures and data in this book over the years I find this a compelling argument for why we as a society should change the ways we talk about men


  2. Jemma Z Jemma Z says:

    This is a great read for parents of boys The author presents a lot of data that is not widely discussed about the actual sexual and relational realities of teen boys today There are many helpful suggestions about how to discuss gender stereotypes familial values about sex consent and media literacy At times the writing is uneven but that is than made up for by the information conveyed If you’re concerned with how to help your son avoid the traps of toxic masculinity and sexual entitlement you might want to try this book


  3. Lance Eaton Lance Eaton says:

    Boys don't have to be boys but we sure want them to think so Overall I appreciate Smiler's effort to delegitimize male culture that emphasizes and trains men to be Casanovas promiscuous and disregardful of women He hits upon several points that correspond to my own experience while also leading down some roads I had not thought of There are some places here he comes up short eg he argues that the male as player only really began to be celebrated in the 1960s and beyond but ignores characters like Costello who was a player regularly celebrated within the Abbott and Costello showIf you enjoyed this review feel free to check out my other reviews and writings at By Any Other Nerd


  4. Matthew Matthew says:

    Through reliable research this book was able to achieve its aims to dismantle the stereotype of boys as driven only by an obsession with having intercourse with multiple partners and call for deeper growth and understanding of modern masculinity Most of the research presented did not seem extraordinarily revolutionary but I suppose it is a new idea that the majority of men in these studies are oriented toward creating and maintaining one functioning relationship


  5. Laura Laura says:

    Decent but not great The author is arguing that we need to stop forcing the player stereotype on boys most boys don't want that but in the process slut shames boys who are sexually active and reenforces a lot of stereotypes he's trying to debunk


  6. Laura Jane Laura Jane says:

    Decent but not great The author is arguing that we need to stop forcing the player stereotype on boys most boys don't want that but in the process slut shames boys who are sexually active and reenforces a lot of stereotypes he's trying to debunk


  7. Marta Marta says:

    Some of this was definitely directed at the parents of teenage boys but it was still fascinating


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10 thoughts on “Challenging Casanova

  1. Kate Irwin-smiler Kate Irwin-smiler says:

    Ok full disclosure I'm married to the author But I'm not a psychologist I don't study media or gender or anything like that so while I've heard a lot about his work over the years I've never read much of it And I think this book gives a great big picture look at why ways we talk about and treat men especially adolescent men harms them and us as a society Individual instances or characters or products that seem amusing or harmless on their own when seen in the context this book offers are less innocent and scary And I while I've heard so much of the facts and figures and data in this book over the years I find this a compelling argument for why we as a society should change the ways we talk about men

  2. Jemma Z Jemma Z says:

    This is a great read for parents of boys The author presents a lot of data that is not widely discussed about the actual sexual and relational realities of teen boys today There are many helpful suggestions about how to discuss gender stereotypes familial values about sex consent and media literacy At times the writing is uneven but that is than made up for by the information conveyed If you’re concerned with how to help your son avoid the traps of toxic masculinity and sexual entitlement you might want to try this book

  3. Lance Eaton Lance Eaton says:

    Boys don't have to be boys but we sure want them to think so Overall I appreciate Smiler's effort to delegitimize male culture that emphasizes and trains men to be Casanovas promiscuous and disregardful of women He hits upon several points that correspond to my own experience while also leading down some roads I had not thought of There are some places here he comes up short eg he argues that the male as player only really began to be celebrated in the 1960s and beyond but ignores characters like Costello who was a player regularly celebrated within the Abbott and Costello showIf you enjoyed this review feel free to check out my other reviews and writings at By Any Other Nerd

  4. Matthew Matthew says:

    Through reliable research this book was able to achieve its aims to dismantle the stereotype of boys as driven only by an obsession with having intercourse with multiple partners and call for deeper growth and understanding of modern masculinity Most of the research presented did not seem extraordinarily revolutionary but I suppose it is a new idea that the majority of men in these studies are oriented toward creating and maintaining one functioning relationship

  5. Laura Laura says:

    Decent but not great The author is arguing that we need to stop forcing the player stereotype on boys most boys don't want that but in the process slut shames boys who are sexually active and reenforces a lot of stereotypes he's trying to debunk

  6. Laura Jane Laura Jane says:

    Decent but not great The author is arguing that we need to stop forcing the player stereotype on boys most boys don't want that but in the process slut shames boys who are sexually active and reenforces a lot of stereotypes he's trying to debunk

  7. Marta Marta says:

    Some of this was definitely directed at the parents of teenage boys but it was still fascinating

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *