Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism

Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism

Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism [Download] ➼ Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism By Sallie B. King – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Engaged Buddhism is the contemporary movement of nonviolent social and political activism found throughout the Buddhist world Its ethical theory sees the world in terms of cause and effect, a view tha Engaged Buddhism is the contemporary The Social PDF/EPUB ë movement of nonviolent social and political activism found throughout the Buddhist world Its ethical theory sees the world in terms of cause and effect, a view that discourages its practitioners from becoming adversaries, blaming or condemning the other Its leaders make some of the most important contributions in the Buddhist world to thinking about issues in political theory, human rights, Being Benevolence: PDF or nonviolence, and social justiceBeing Benevolence provides for the first time a rich overview of the main ideas and arguments of prominent Engaged Buddhist thinkers and activists on a variety of questions What kind of political system should modern Asian states have What are the pros and cons of Western liberalism Can Buddhism support the idea of human rights Can there ever be a nonviolent nation state Benevolence: The Social PDF/EPUB Â It identifies the roots of Engaged Buddhist social ethics in such traditional Buddhist concepts and practices as interdependence, compassion, and meditation, and shows how these are applied to particular social and political issues It illuminates the movement s metaphysical views on the individual and society and goes on to examine how Engaged Buddhists respond to fundamental questions in political theory concerning the proper balance between the individual and society The second half of the volume focuses on applied social political issues human rights, nonviolence, and social justice.


10 thoughts on “Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism

  1. Alex Alex says:

    A great, readable introduction to how Engaged Buddhists in Asia imagine a what Buddhism even is and b what engagement in the world might consist of Or, an intellectual history of the present c late 1990s early 2000s An anthology of views expressed by an impressive cohort representing many Buddhist national traditions Tzu Chi s Cheng Yen, HH Dalai Lama, Sarvodaya s A T Ariyaratne, Thich Nhat Hanh, Phra Payutto, Maha Ghosananda, etc Chapters are partible and may be read independentl A great, readable introduction to how Engaged Buddhists in Asia imagine a what Buddhism even is and b what engagement in the world might consist of Or, an intellectual history of the present c late 1990s early 2000s An anthology of views expressed by an impressive cohort representing many Buddhist national traditions Tzu Chi s Cheng Yen, HH Dalai Lama, Sarvodaya s A T Ariyaratne, Thich Nhat Hanh, Phra Payutto, Maha Ghosananda, etc Chapters are partible and may be read independently And I liked the set up it might seem like Engaged Buddhism merely clothes Western social activism in Buddhist rhetoric, or merely reacts to modernity, but the case is stronger for viewing the movement as another fourth turning of the wheel Toward that end, the author suggests, we should brush up on what Engaged Buddhists take to be foundational to Buddhism Chapter two , see how it builds its own social ethical theories chapter three and ideas of self and society chapter four , and explore how it incorporates and challenges paradigms like human rights, non violence, and justice chapters five, six, and seven.I was most engaged in the books when the author explores dissenting views between various figures, and most skeptical when everyone seemed to be on the same page, or Engaged Buddhism spoke with one voice It s interesting to read the chapter on human rights after many Western left thinkers have critiqued its dominance and its failings not enough while the author seems to champion Engaged Buddhism s embrace of the human rights paradigm, even some of Engaged Buddhists thinking recorded in this chapter anticipate these newer critiques.I m still catching up on the scholarship on Engaged Buddhism and I believe this book will be a great base


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10 thoughts on “Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism

  1. Alex Alex says:

    A great, readable introduction to how Engaged Buddhists in Asia imagine a what Buddhism even is and b what engagement in the world might consist of Or, an intellectual history of the present c late 1990s early 2000s An anthology of views expressed by an impressive cohort representing many Buddhist national traditions Tzu Chi s Cheng Yen, HH Dalai Lama, Sarvodaya s A T Ariyaratne, Thich Nhat Hanh, Phra Payutto, Maha Ghosananda, etc Chapters are partible and may be read independentl A great, readable introduction to how Engaged Buddhists in Asia imagine a what Buddhism even is and b what engagement in the world might consist of Or, an intellectual history of the present c late 1990s early 2000s An anthology of views expressed by an impressive cohort representing many Buddhist national traditions Tzu Chi s Cheng Yen, HH Dalai Lama, Sarvodaya s A T Ariyaratne, Thich Nhat Hanh, Phra Payutto, Maha Ghosananda, etc Chapters are partible and may be read independently And I liked the set up it might seem like Engaged Buddhism merely clothes Western social activism in Buddhist rhetoric, or merely reacts to modernity, but the case is stronger for viewing the movement as another fourth turning of the wheel Toward that end, the author suggests, we should brush up on what Engaged Buddhists take to be foundational to Buddhism Chapter two , see how it builds its own social ethical theories chapter three and ideas of self and society chapter four , and explore how it incorporates and challenges paradigms like human rights, non violence, and justice chapters five, six, and seven.I was most engaged in the books when the author explores dissenting views between various figures, and most skeptical when everyone seemed to be on the same page, or Engaged Buddhism spoke with one voice It s interesting to read the chapter on human rights after many Western left thinkers have critiqued its dominance and its failings not enough while the author seems to champion Engaged Buddhism s embrace of the human rights paradigm, even some of Engaged Buddhists thinking recorded in this chapter anticipate these newer critiques.I m still catching up on the scholarship on Engaged Buddhism and I believe this book will be a great base

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