Sally Wister's Journal eBook ↠ Sally Wister's eBook

Sally Wister's Journal eBook ↠ Sally Wister's eBook

Sally Wister's Journal ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☉ Sally Wister's Journal Author Sally Wister – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk In 1775 the British invaded Philadelphia Sally Wister a sixteen year old girl was sent to the country side to avoid harm During her time there in order to keep a friend up to date she kept a journal T In the British invaded Philadelphia Sally Wister a sixteen year old girl was sent to the country side to avoid harm During her time there in order to keep a friend up to date she kept a journal This lively diary has not been available to the book buying public in nearly a hundred years but is a vital and delightful historical record of a young girl's life during a perilous and all important time Sally Wister's eBook ð in American history.


6 thoughts on “Sally Wister's Journal

  1. Sarah Brazytis Sarah Brazytis says:

    This really truly genuine journal is adorable Sally Wister is an irresistibly cute uaker girl who will banish all of your preconceived notions of a Colonial era young lady She writes her journal 'to' a dear friend she will not see for some time so that Deborah will know exactly how her days passed as officers handsome ugly attractive and otherwise flit in and out of family life She is uite artless about herself and her friends being appealing to these young soldiers A polite good morning from Major sociable than ever No wonder; a stoic could not resist such affable damsels as we are They form many new friends and some of the accounts of their mischief really are very funny You get a good idea of what it was like for civilian households to live day in and day out with the knowledge that the British could be over the next rise in the road coming to raze your house and turn you out pennilessThere is a heavy emphasis on romance and boygirl relationships but it is all uite pure not so much as a hand holding if I recall correctlyVery enjoyable read and especially because it gives you a peek into how real people of that time lived and acted Besides Sally would make such a fun companion if she lived todayBonus Descriptions of clothing and daily dress are very valuable for reenactors and costumers


  2. Timons Esaias Timons Esaias says:

    This is a slight little memoir by someone who saw no battles but it is worth reading nonetheless Sally Wister was a 16 year old uaker girl at the time of the Battle of Brandywine in the American Revolution Her family had residences both in and near Philadelphia and when the British occupied the city the Wisters moved away and sent the children even further Sally stayed in a farmhouse next to a major highway not far from Wissahickon Creek which was being used as a potential defensive line by the Americans This meant that troops were constantly passing nearby or camping in the pasture; and officers were regularly billeted in the farmhouseThe text records her and her friends' flirtations with the officers some of whom became important politicians after the War and their worries about a British attack It gives a sketchy but realistic impression of what life just behind the lines was like from the view of a non combatantTwo brief detailsA description of visiting a vacated army camp This morn my charming friend and self ascended the barren hills of Whitemarsh from the tops of which we had an extensive prospect of the country round The traces of the Army which encamp'd on these hills are very visible ragged huts imitations of chimneys and many other ruinous objects which plainly show'd they had been thereThe unit stationed at the house begins packing up unexpectedly Yes madam Are you Mr Wister's wife? No his daughter Is your papa at home? No I reply'd but invited him in to see mama He agreed; dismounted as did many other officers; but he alone came into our parlour Watts follow'd to bid us adieu They sat a few minutes; told us that two of their men had deserted and when that was the case they generally mov'd their uarters Watts told him how I was frightened He said I paid but a poor compliment to their cavalry I only smil'd


  3. Kate H Kate H says:

    Sally Wister is a boy crazy 16 year old uaker girl living in Germantown during the Siege of Philadelphia by the British in 1777 British and American soldiers visit and are uartered at her family's summer house This book is great if you need some insight into dialect of the time or want to hop into the head of a girl not so different from teens of today she muses on clothes the cuteness of various soldiers pranks she pulls and perhaps most memorably for me and I paraphrase here Men all they talk about is food and how hungry they are Good for research or a laugh


  4. Kayla Kayla says:

    Interesting but the uaker language is sometimes hard and annoying to read Lately I have been reading a LOT of true diaries majorly those of young people and children and this has been one of the most interesting so far Sarah Wister a uaker was 16 years old when she wrote her journal in 1777 and 1778 during the Revolutionary War In her journal Sally describes her meeting of several American Captains


  5. Avis Black Avis Black says:

    Although she lived in an interesting period Wister's writing is atrocious Avoid this one


  6. Sophi Frost Sophi Frost says:

    This is a sweet and endearing little journal which gives an inside look at life of a young lady during the revolution I enjoyed Sally's descriptions and her wit Truly a treasure


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6 thoughts on “Sally Wister's Journal

  1. Sarah Brazytis Sarah Brazytis says:

    This really truly genuine journal is adorable Sally Wister is an irresistibly cute uaker girl who will banish all of your preconceived notions of a Colonial era young lady She writes her journal 'to' a dear friend she will not see for some time so that Deborah will know exactly how her days passed as officers handsome ugly attractive and otherwise flit in and out of family life She is uite artless about herself and her friends being appealing to these young soldiers A polite good morning from Major sociable than ever No wonder; a stoic could not resist such affable damsels as we are They form many new friends and some of the accounts of their mischief really are very funny You get a good idea of what it was like for civilian households to live day in and day out with the knowledge that the British could be over the next rise in the road coming to raze your house and turn you out pennilessThere is a heavy emphasis on romance and boygirl relationships but it is all uite pure not so much as a hand holding if I recall correctlyVery enjoyable read and especially because it gives you a peek into how real people of that time lived and acted Besides Sally would make such a fun companion if she lived todayBonus Descriptions of clothing and daily dress are very valuable for reenactors and costumers

  2. Timons Esaias Timons Esaias says:

    This is a slight little memoir by someone who saw no battles but it is worth reading nonetheless Sally Wister was a 16 year old uaker girl at the time of the Battle of Brandywine in the American Revolution Her family had residences both in and near Philadelphia and when the British occupied the city the Wisters moved away and sent the children even further Sally stayed in a farmhouse next to a major highway not far from Wissahickon Creek which was being used as a potential defensive line by the Americans This meant that troops were constantly passing nearby or camping in the pasture; and officers were regularly billeted in the farmhouseThe text records her and her friends' flirtations with the officers some of whom became important politicians after the War and their worries about a British attack It gives a sketchy but realistic impression of what life just behind the lines was like from the view of a non combatantTwo brief detailsA description of visiting a vacated army camp This morn my charming friend and self ascended the barren hills of Whitemarsh from the tops of which we had an extensive prospect of the country round The traces of the Army which encamp'd on these hills are very visible ragged huts imitations of chimneys and many other ruinous objects which plainly show'd they had been thereThe unit stationed at the house begins packing up unexpectedly Yes madam Are you Mr Wister's wife? No his daughter Is your papa at home? No I reply'd but invited him in to see mama He agreed; dismounted as did many other officers; but he alone came into our parlour Watts follow'd to bid us adieu They sat a few minutes; told us that two of their men had deserted and when that was the case they generally mov'd their uarters Watts told him how I was frightened He said I paid but a poor compliment to their cavalry I only smil'd

  3. Kate H Kate H says:

    Sally Wister is a boy crazy 16 year old uaker girl living in Germantown during the Siege of Philadelphia by the British in 1777 British and American soldiers visit and are uartered at her family's summer house This book is great if you need some insight into dialect of the time or want to hop into the head of a girl not so different from teens of today she muses on clothes the cuteness of various soldiers pranks she pulls and perhaps most memorably for me and I paraphrase here Men all they talk about is food and how hungry they are Good for research or a laugh

  4. Kayla Kayla says:

    Interesting but the uaker language is sometimes hard and annoying to read Lately I have been reading a LOT of true diaries majorly those of young people and children and this has been one of the most interesting so far Sarah Wister a uaker was 16 years old when she wrote her journal in 1777 and 1778 during the Revolutionary War In her journal Sally describes her meeting of several American Captains

  5. Avis Black Avis Black says:

    Although she lived in an interesting period Wister's writing is atrocious Avoid this one

  6. Sophi Frost Sophi Frost says:

    This is a sweet and endearing little journal which gives an inside look at life of a young lady during the revolution I enjoyed Sally's descriptions and her wit Truly a treasure

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