Petite Poucette MOBI Þ Paperback

Petite Poucette MOBI Þ Paperback


  • Paperback
  • 84 pages
  • Petite Poucette
  • Michel Serres
  • French
  • 08 September 2016
  • 9782746506053

10 thoughts on “Petite Poucette

  1. Ruby Ruby says:

    25interesting ideas here but defeats its own purpose by not including the people it purports to talk about which is a problem with academic texts generally I admit but it becomes particularly striking here not sure what the reader is left with in the end


  2. Jacob Jacob says:

    This text presents a reading of a new historical milieu that has not been adeuately taken up by philosophy Thumbelina is a coded pseudonym for the anonymous individual or today She is a child of prosthetic information externalized knowledge Our systems of teaching no longer work for her as she already has access to knowledge Novel approaches to school are reuired that grasp this novel subject Very interesting read insofar as we can read in Thumbelina the production of a new subjectivity that comes to us from the outside an unfolding of the ‘past present’ into this unrecognizable present


  3. Alex Golub Alex Golub says:

    I respect Serres as a philosopher and have profited from some of his other work but this volume will seem infuriatingly vague and derivative to anyone who has thought about digital media at all I don’t just mean academics If you like listening to podcasts about technology you have already thought through the issues Serres discusses in this book Frankly I would have stopped reading it if it wasn’t so short Feel free to skip unless you need a uick reed to keep up with your Goodreads reading challenge


  4. Bram Bram says:

    Firstly I'm a little surprised how much I appreciated Serres not uttering the word millenial and taking the these crazy kids today approach While reading this I noticed how much I do this myself not accepting that the crazy kids of a few years back are now bona fide adults and actually the core of the very near future society and that they may not be exactly the same as the current core of society So I was very aware that I know that technology is changing people but at the same time I'm expecting future society to stay exactly the same I think Serres makes a very good point thereAlso I think that Serres over romanticizes the situation by a mile When you think students are being noisy in your classroom because they are expecting insight instead of readily available information I think you are mistaking apathy for a statement of criticism These kinds of examples echo throughout the book I might be wrong but to me it seems that Serres does not only expect the new generation to be different but better compared to their ancestors And while I certainly hope for this I'm not sure we can use it as our base expection


  5. Michal Šramo Michal Šramo says:

    In general the book doesn´t know what it wants to be An academic text without proper structure reflection thought fiction philosophical reasoning or criticism? It´s all of it and none of it Despite describing some very simple ideas world has changed like never before; externalization of mind and body; changes need to be addressed big that philosophical language and use of metaphors make it a bit hard to read english translation Author recognizes the platform of this world had changed he names it but leaves the reader without any idea how to deal with it Still worth reading especially because very short Somehow carries an optimistic message about this world


  6. Cathy Cathy says:

    Michel Serres raises interesting ideas about today's young Internet generation and how their use of smartphones social media instant access to knowledge etc is changing society how and what we learn how we interact how we differ from our ancestors But that is pretty much all he does There is no follow through or conclusion or perhaps speculation on where it will all lead us This essay is ultimately pointless and unsatisfying


  7. Bob Woodley Bob Woodley says:

    Written in 2012 at the height of the Silicon Valley disruption era by a french intellectual in residence at Stanford this is a strange mixture of 'intello' tropes and internet euphoria This was written before Russia used social networks to manipulate our elections before the rise of the far right before fake news Life was so much simpler thenThe book is conceived as a love letter from the boomer generation to wired millenials trying to understand what their world view must be like and give it coherence and intellectual respectability It is uneven The image of St Denis carrying his head as a metaphor for people staring at their phones is kind of clever The middle section on politics seems like re packaged 1968 thought One theme throughout is how the instant access to knowledge makes the old hierarchies of powerknowledge obsolete That seems less convincing now that we have flat earthers and anti vaxxers all empowered by on line 'knowledge'Still his viewpoint is one we don't hear much in the US Tech press and the writing as always with Serres is delightful and would be uite difficult to translate


  8. J Murnaghan J Murnaghan says:

    Always a pleasure to read Serres' style of presenting ideas I can't say that I agree with his optimism on the topic but this short essay has convinced me to try to stay open minded


  9. Sam Sam says:

    Interesting meditation and philosophy of our current school age generation


  10. Edouard Reinach Edouard Reinach says:

    A grand book A must read if we want to understand how deep a revolution the technological revolution is to our way to deal with knowledge information and education


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Petite Poucette➺ [Reading] ➼ Petite Poucette By Michel Serres ➯ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Le monde a tellement changé ue les jeunes doivent tout réinventerNos sociétés occidentales ont déjà vécu deux révolutions le passage de l'oral à l'écrit puis de l'écrit à l'imprimé Comme Le monde a tellement changé ue les jeunes doivent tout réinventerNos sociétés occidentales ont déjà vécu deux révolutions le passage de l'oral à l'écrit puis de l'écrit à l'imprimé Comme chacune des précédentes la troisième tout aussi décisive s'accompagne de mutations politiues sociales et cognitives Ce sont des périodes de crisesDe l'essor des nouvelles technologies un nouvel humain est né Michel Serres le baptise «Petite Poucette» clin d'oeil à la maestria avec lauelle les messages fusent de ses pouces Petite Poucette va devoir réinventer une manière de vivre ensemble des institutions une manière d'être et de connaître Débute une nouvelle ère ui verra la victoire de la multitude anonyme sur les élites dirigeantes bien identifiées ; du savoir discuté sur les doctrines enseignées ; d'une société immatérielle librement connectée sur la société du spectacle à sens uniueCe livre propose à Petite Poucette une collaboration entre générations pour mettre en oeuvre cette utopie seule réalité possibleA l'origine de ce livre un discours prononcé à l'Académie française en ui a été très largement diffusé tout d'abord par la publication d'un extrait le lendemain dans «Le Monde» repris par un article dans «Le Figaro» puis d'un grand mouvement sur InternetProfesseur à Stanford University membre de l'Académie française Michel Serres est l'auteur de nombreux essais philosophiues et d'histoire des sciences dont les derniers Temps des crises et Musiue ont été largement salués par la presse Il est l'un des rares philosophes contemporains à proposer une vision du monde ui associe les sciences et la culture.


About the Author: Michel Serres

Michel Serres was a French philosopher theorist and author.


10 thoughts on “Petite Poucette

  1. Ruby Ruby says:

    25interesting ideas here but defeats its own purpose by not including the people it purports to talk about which is a problem with academic texts generally I admit but it becomes particularly striking here not sure what the reader is left with in the end

  2. Jacob Jacob says:

    This text presents a reading of a new historical milieu that has not been adeuately taken up by philosophy Thumbelina is a coded pseudonym for the anonymous individual or today She is a child of prosthetic information externalized knowledge Our systems of teaching no longer work for her as she already has access to knowledge Novel approaches to school are reuired that grasp this novel subject Very interesting read insofar as we can read in Thumbelina the production of a new subjectivity that comes to us from the outside an unfolding of the ‘past present’ into this unrecognizable present

  3. Alex Golub Alex Golub says:

    I respect Serres as a philosopher and have profited from some of his other work but this volume will seem infuriatingly vague and derivative to anyone who has thought about digital media at all I don’t just mean academics If you like listening to podcasts about technology you have already thought through the issues Serres discusses in this book Frankly I would have stopped reading it if it wasn’t so short Feel free to skip unless you need a uick reed to keep up with your Goodreads reading challenge

  4. Bram Bram says:

    Firstly I'm a little surprised how much I appreciated Serres not uttering the word millenial and taking the these crazy kids today approach While reading this I noticed how much I do this myself not accepting that the crazy kids of a few years back are now bona fide adults and actually the core of the very near future society and that they may not be exactly the same as the current core of society So I was very aware that I know that technology is changing people but at the same time I'm expecting future society to stay exactly the same I think Serres makes a very good point thereAlso I think that Serres over romanticizes the situation by a mile When you think students are being noisy in your classroom because they are expecting insight instead of readily available information I think you are mistaking apathy for a statement of criticism These kinds of examples echo throughout the book I might be wrong but to me it seems that Serres does not only expect the new generation to be different but better compared to their ancestors And while I certainly hope for this I'm not sure we can use it as our base expection

  5. Michal Šramo Michal Šramo says:

    In general the book doesn´t know what it wants to be An academic text without proper structure reflection thought fiction philosophical reasoning or criticism? It´s all of it and none of it Despite describing some very simple ideas world has changed like never before; externalization of mind and body; changes need to be addressed big that philosophical language and use of metaphors make it a bit hard to read english translation Author recognizes the platform of this world had changed he names it but leaves the reader without any idea how to deal with it Still worth reading especially because very short Somehow carries an optimistic message about this world

  6. Cathy Cathy says:

    Michel Serres raises interesting ideas about today's young Internet generation and how their use of smartphones social media instant access to knowledge etc is changing society how and what we learn how we interact how we differ from our ancestors But that is pretty much all he does There is no follow through or conclusion or perhaps speculation on where it will all lead us This essay is ultimately pointless and unsatisfying

  7. Bob Woodley Bob Woodley says:

    Written in 2012 at the height of the Silicon Valley disruption era by a french intellectual in residence at Stanford this is a strange mixture of 'intello' tropes and internet euphoria This was written before Russia used social networks to manipulate our elections before the rise of the far right before fake news Life was so much simpler thenThe book is conceived as a love letter from the boomer generation to wired millenials trying to understand what their world view must be like and give it coherence and intellectual respectability It is uneven The image of St Denis carrying his head as a metaphor for people staring at their phones is kind of clever The middle section on politics seems like re packaged 1968 thought One theme throughout is how the instant access to knowledge makes the old hierarchies of powerknowledge obsolete That seems less convincing now that we have flat earthers and anti vaxxers all empowered by on line 'knowledge'Still his viewpoint is one we don't hear much in the US Tech press and the writing as always with Serres is delightful and would be uite difficult to translate

  8. J Murnaghan J Murnaghan says:

    Always a pleasure to read Serres' style of presenting ideas I can't say that I agree with his optimism on the topic but this short essay has convinced me to try to stay open minded

  9. Sam Sam says:

    Interesting meditation and philosophy of our current school age generation

  10. Edouard Reinach Edouard Reinach says:

    A grand book A must read if we want to understand how deep a revolution the technological revolution is to our way to deal with knowledge information and education

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *