Relativity: The Special and the General Theory Kindle

Relativity: The Special and the General Theory Kindle

Relativity: The Special and the General Theory ❮Read❯ ➪ Relativity: The Special and the General Theory Author Albert Einstein – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk An accesible version of Einstein s masterpiece of theory, written by the genius himselfAccording to Einstein himself, this book is intended to give an exact insight into the theory of Relativity to th Special and PDF Î An accesible version of Einstein s masterpiece of theory, written by the genius himselfAccording to Einstein himself, this book is intended to give an exact insight into the theory of Relativity to those readers who, from a general scientific and philosophical point of view, are interested in the theory, but who are not conversant with the mathematical apparatus of theoretical physics When he wrote the book in , Einstein s name was scarcely known outside Relativity: The eBook ☆ the physics institutes Having just completed his masterpiece, The General Theory of Relativity which provided a brand new theory of gravity and promised a new perspective on the cosmos as a whole he set out at once to share his excitement with as wide a public as possible in this popular and accessible bookHere published for the first time as a Penguin Classic, this edition of Relativity features a new introduction by bestselling science author Nigel The Special and MOBI ô CalderFor than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English speaking world With than , titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up to date translations by award winning translators.


10 thoughts on “Relativity: The Special and the General Theory

  1. Jonathan Jonathan says:

    This is the copy that I wanted In his own words, he describes conceptually the theory of special and general relativity He uses very clever and easy to understand theoretical and real situations to guide your understanding towards an omega point I bought this book at special price from here This is the copy that I wanted In his own words, he describes conceptually the theory of special and general relativity He uses very clever and easy to understand theoretical and real situations to guide your understanding towards an omega point I bought this book at special price from here


  2. Dominika Košútová Dominika Košútová says:

    I hope that no one will ask me what was this book about.


  3. Riku Sayuj Riku Sayuj says:

    Some years ago in France a book by Jean Fran ois Gautier appeared, entitled Does the universe exist. Good question.What if the universe were a concept like cosmic ether, or phlogiston, or the conspiracy of the Elders of Zion Philosophically, Gautier s arguments make sense.The idea of the universe, as the totality of the cosmos, is one that comes from the most ancient cosmographies, cosmologies, and cosmogonies But can one describe, as if seeing it from above, something within which we are cont Some years ago in France a book by Jean Fran ois Gautier appeared, entitled Does the universe exist. Good question.What if the universe were a concept like cosmic ether, or phlogiston, or the conspiracy of the Elders of Zion Philosophically, Gautier s arguments make sense.The idea of the universe, as the totality of the cosmos, is one that comes from the most ancient cosmographies, cosmologies, and cosmogonies But can one describe, as if seeing it from above, something within which we are contained, of which we are part, and from which we cannot exit Can there be a descriptive geometry of the universe when there is no space outside it on which to project it Can we talk about the beginning of the universe, when a temporal notion such as beginning must refer to the parameter of a clock, while the universe must be the clock of itself and cannot be referred to anything that is external to it Can we say, as Eddington does, that a hundred billion stars constitute a galaxy and a hundred billion galaxies constitute the universe, when, as Gautier observes, while a galaxy is an observable object, the universe is not, and therefore we would be establishing an improper analogy between two incommensurable objects Can we postulate the universe and then study with empirical instruments this postulate as if it were an object Can a singular object exist surely the most singular of all that has as its characteristic that of being only a law And what if the story of the big bang were a tale as fantastic as the gnostic account that insisted the universe was generated by the lapsus of a clumsy demiurge Basically, this criticism of the notion of the universe reiterates Kant s criticism of the notion of the world.After all, the cultivated person s first duty is to be always prepared to rewrite the encyclopedia.P.S The reflections are directly borrowed from Umberto Eco s lectures, but are genuine concerns of this reviewer too Questions are addressed to Einstein, of course


  4. E. G. E. G. says:

    PrefaceNote to the Fifteenth Edition Relativity Appendices 1 Simple Derivation of the Lorentz Transformation2 Minowski s Four dimensional Space World 3 The Experimental Confirmation of the General Theory of Relativity a Motion of the Perihelion of Mercury b Deflection of Light by a Gravitational Field c Displacement of Spectral Lines towards the Red4 The Structure of Space according to the General Theory of Relativity5 Relativity and the Problem of SpaceBibliographyIndex


  5. Rob Rob says:

    edit i wrote the 4 star review below before reading the fifth appendix i mean, who could imagine that an appendix could change anything well, this one did all the chapters in the body of the book are 2 or 3 pages Appendix V is a 20 page essay, written 36 years after the rest of the book and just 3 years before einstein died it is a tour de force on the history, philosophy, and psychology i kid you not of the scientific understanding of empty space it was shocking, thrilling, amazing th edit i wrote the 4 star review below before reading the fifth appendix i mean, who could imagine that an appendix could change anything well, this one did all the chapters in the body of the book are 2 or 3 pages Appendix V is a 20 page essay, written 36 years after the rest of the book and just 3 years before einstein died it is a tour de force on the history, philosophy, and psychology i kid you not of the scientific understanding of empty space it was shocking, thrilling, amazing the book now gets 5 stars.careful, i think some editions don t have Appendix V.original 4 star review the subtitle of this slim book is a clear explanation that anyone can understand , but unfortunately i m afraid that s far from true there s not too much math in the book, but there is enough that anyone really needs to be replaced with any egghead but if you are already familiar with relativity, this is a great book, with lots of deep philosophical underpinnings as expounded my the man himself i found his writing style to be exquisite not too dry, not too colloquial.the treatment of special relativity is wonderful.but trying to teach general relativity in 45 pages with no math is just too tall an order he even warns us as things start to get rough I am guilty of a certain slovenliness of treatment, which as we know from the special theory of relativity, is far from being unimportant and pardonable It is now high time that we remedy this defect but I would mention at the outset, that this matter lays no small claims on the patience and on the power of abstraction of the reader indeed, the treatment of GR is in very broad strokes, with rather obscure connections still, quite enjoyable to find this readable text by one of my great heroes


  6. Robert Robert says:

    The aim of this book is to introduce people without a strong physics or even scientific background to the special and general theories of relativity theories that Einstein was the primary developer of Einstein assumes the reader has passes a university matriculation exam What that meant in the first half of the 20th Century, I don t know but in practice what s required is the level of algebra I had by age 16 plus a smattering of mentions of the square root of minus 1 I also found basic The aim of this book is to introduce people without a strong physics or even scientific background to the special and general theories of relativity theories that Einstein was the primary developer of Einstein assumes the reader has passes a university matriculation exam What that meant in the first half of the 20th Century, I don t know but in practice what s required is the level of algebra I had by age 16 plus a smattering of mentions of the square root of minus 1 I also found basic calculus useful for one section, though it is possible to do without it.For the most part this book is excellent, introducing the minimal amount of mathematics and formal language necessary to understand the most important and fundamental concepts of Einstein s theories in a way that is accessible whilst concise It might be possible to do it better with a bigger book, a less formal style and a lotdiagrams but it very interesting to get Einstein s unique perspective as originator of the theories and insight into his thought processes.A few sections are remarkable in contrast with the rest, for being unclear The section on addition of velocities in special relativity leaves ratherto the reader than anything else in the book, mathematically, and when I looked it up it turned out to be much easier to work out using basic calculus than algebraic division and the bit that wasn t clear was that a division of two equations was what was required This section could be skipped without losing much The remainder of the muddy sections come at the back end of the section on general relativity The simplest precise mathematical formulation of this theory is expressed using tensors and tensor algebra is way beyond what anybody encounters in standard school maths or physics curricula Einstein makes no attempt to explain it and in fact never shows the fundamental equation of general relativity This makes it very hard for him to explain how gravitational fields and space time interact, which leads to the lack of clarity in the latter stages of this part of the book Things get easier and clearer again when he moves on to relativity and cosmology.The final part of the book is a collection of appendices expanding on things discussed earlier on I required pen and paper to check the derivation of the Lorentz Transformations from first principles but this section could just be skipped if the maths bothers you it doesn t add a lot but it is interesting to see it, if your algebra is up to it.The most rewarding thing for me, since nothing here is completely new to me, was listening to Einstein s voice He seemed to come at things from a viewpoint muchgenerally philosophical than most present day physicists would, discussing Kant, Descartes and Hume, for instance The section on the concept of empty space was fascinating he concludes that general relativity precludes this notion one cannot have space time without it containing fields What he means is fields of force the electromagnetic field, gravitational field etc This implies the notion of a field being present even if its magnitude is zero which is a bizarre concept Modern quantum mechanics backs these ideas to the hilt and leads me to think that one of the most important areas of inquiry for fundamental physics as it stands is the connection between the classical idea of space time and the quantum idea of the vacuum The fundamental nature of both is obscure and in some sense they should be the same thing.Overall this is an excellent introduction to special relativity and at least the conceptual underpinnings of general relativity, if not of the full theory, which really just can t be explained properly without knowledge of tensors


  7. Adam Adam says:

    The theory of relativity is amazing and important, but contrary to what the tagline says, Einstein himself is probably not the best person to have explain it to you I read this class for Freshman Studies in college, and I honestly have to admit that I wouldn t have gotten much of it without the significant aid of in depth lectures and classroom discussions This is not because the ideas themselves are too complex, but because Einstein fails in his attempt to make his ideas understood to a layma The theory of relativity is amazing and important, but contrary to what the tagline says, Einstein himself is probably not the best person to have explain it to you I read this class for Freshman Studies in college, and I honestly have to admit that I wouldn t have gotten much of it without the significant aid of in depth lectures and classroom discussions This is not because the ideas themselves are too complex, but because Einstein fails in his attempt to make his ideas understood to a layman I don t know what book you ought to read instead, but there are certainly many alternatives, of which some must be good Einstein does not assume any knowledge of physics, but he does kind of glide over what his variables mean or where they come from, and this makes it hard to grasp what the math means and how it fits in


  8. Sanjay Gautam Sanjay Gautam says:

    This book by Dr Einstein is very well written, though you will find the anatomy of sentences a little unusual Well this should not be a problem considering the theory s difficulty level Though the theory is very simple mathematically special theory of relativity I m talking about , but the case is reverse when it comes to understand it intuitively It defies the common sense And that s what the book is about It changes your outlook, the way you see the nature and gives you a new and better This book by Dr Einstein is very well written, though you will find the anatomy of sentences a little unusual Well this should not be a problem considering the theory s difficulty level Though the theory is very simple mathematically special theory of relativity I m talking about , but the case is reverse when it comes to understand it intuitively It defies the common sense And that s what the book is about It changes your outlook, the way you see the nature and gives you a new and better understanding


  9. Erik Graff Erik Graff says:

    As a kid my serious interests were scientific I collected feathers, insects, rocks and fossils maintained an aerospace scrapbook kept a journal about space exploration and read a lot of science books ranging from popular stuff and textbooks to serious works from the library which I hardly understood My greatest intellectual interests by junior high were in cosmology and astronomy.During middle school, or possibly during the freshman year in high school, I started going to the library to rea As a kid my serious interests were scientific I collected feathers, insects, rocks and fossils maintained an aerospace scrapbook kept a journal about space exploration and read a lot of science books ranging from popular stuff and textbooks to serious works from the library which I hardly understood My greatest intellectual interests by junior high were in cosmology and astronomy.During middle school, or possibly during the freshman year in high school, I started going to the library to read Einstein Like many, I thought him the ne plus ultra and believed that mastering his work was of great importance Having learned some algebra, trigonometry and geometry in school, I was able to read a little bit of his notation, but not much Basically, it was beyond me.In high school, starting freshman year, geopolitical concerns started commanding my attention I d been raised under the mushroom cloud like the rest of my generation and we were at war in southeast Asia History and politics seemedimportant, ethically and personally, than science Sopho Chemistry sealed the matter My lab skills were terrible, the teacher was poor, the textbook boring That was my last physical science class until a single physics course in college.Being laid off from Loyola and working now only part time gave me the opportunity to pursue some of the things I d foregone So, I picked up Einstein s Relativity, a book he wrote about the relativity theory for the general public


  10. Owlseyes Owlseyes says:

    The Times from Nov 10, 1919, left Nov 16, 1919, center and Dec 3, 1919 He was living alone A friend, Janos Plesch, once said, He sleeps until he is awakened he stays awake until he is told to go to bed he will go hungry until he is given something to eat and then he eats until he is stopped In A Century Ago, Einstein s Theory of Relativity Changed EverythingBy DENNIS OVERBYENOV 24, 2015http www.nytimes.com 2015 11 24 sciAwesome, see here The Times from Nov 10, 1919, left Nov 16, 1919, center and Dec 3, 1919 He was living alone A friend, Janos Plesch, once said, He sleeps until he is awakened he stays awake until he is told to go to bed he will go hungry until he is given something to eat and then he eats until he is stopped In A Century Ago, Einstein s Theory of Relativity Changed EverythingBy DENNIS OVERBYENOV 24, 2015http www.nytimes.com 2015 11 24 sciAwesome, see here


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10 thoughts on “Relativity: The Special and the General Theory

  1. Jonathan Jonathan says:

    This is the copy that I wanted In his own words, he describes conceptually the theory of special and general relativity He uses very clever and easy to understand theoretical and real situations to guide your understanding towards an omega point I bought this book at special price from here This is the copy that I wanted In his own words, he describes conceptually the theory of special and general relativity He uses very clever and easy to understand theoretical and real situations to guide your understanding towards an omega point I bought this book at special price from here

  2. Dominika Košútová Dominika Košútová says:

    I hope that no one will ask me what was this book about.

  3. Riku Sayuj Riku Sayuj says:

    Some years ago in France a book by Jean Fran ois Gautier appeared, entitled Does the universe exist. Good question.What if the universe were a concept like cosmic ether, or phlogiston, or the conspiracy of the Elders of Zion Philosophically, Gautier s arguments make sense.The idea of the universe, as the totality of the cosmos, is one that comes from the most ancient cosmographies, cosmologies, and cosmogonies But can one describe, as if seeing it from above, something within which we are cont Some years ago in France a book by Jean Fran ois Gautier appeared, entitled Does the universe exist. Good question.What if the universe were a concept like cosmic ether, or phlogiston, or the conspiracy of the Elders of Zion Philosophically, Gautier s arguments make sense.The idea of the universe, as the totality of the cosmos, is one that comes from the most ancient cosmographies, cosmologies, and cosmogonies But can one describe, as if seeing it from above, something within which we are contained, of which we are part, and from which we cannot exit Can there be a descriptive geometry of the universe when there is no space outside it on which to project it Can we talk about the beginning of the universe, when a temporal notion such as beginning must refer to the parameter of a clock, while the universe must be the clock of itself and cannot be referred to anything that is external to it Can we say, as Eddington does, that a hundred billion stars constitute a galaxy and a hundred billion galaxies constitute the universe, when, as Gautier observes, while a galaxy is an observable object, the universe is not, and therefore we would be establishing an improper analogy between two incommensurable objects Can we postulate the universe and then study with empirical instruments this postulate as if it were an object Can a singular object exist surely the most singular of all that has as its characteristic that of being only a law And what if the story of the big bang were a tale as fantastic as the gnostic account that insisted the universe was generated by the lapsus of a clumsy demiurge Basically, this criticism of the notion of the universe reiterates Kant s criticism of the notion of the world.After all, the cultivated person s first duty is to be always prepared to rewrite the encyclopedia.P.S The reflections are directly borrowed from Umberto Eco s lectures, but are genuine concerns of this reviewer too Questions are addressed to Einstein, of course

  4. E. G. E. G. says:

    PrefaceNote to the Fifteenth Edition Relativity Appendices 1 Simple Derivation of the Lorentz Transformation2 Minowski s Four dimensional Space World 3 The Experimental Confirmation of the General Theory of Relativity a Motion of the Perihelion of Mercury b Deflection of Light by a Gravitational Field c Displacement of Spectral Lines towards the Red4 The Structure of Space according to the General Theory of Relativity5 Relativity and the Problem of SpaceBibliographyIndex

  5. Rob Rob says:

    edit i wrote the 4 star review below before reading the fifth appendix i mean, who could imagine that an appendix could change anything well, this one did all the chapters in the body of the book are 2 or 3 pages Appendix V is a 20 page essay, written 36 years after the rest of the book and just 3 years before einstein died it is a tour de force on the history, philosophy, and psychology i kid you not of the scientific understanding of empty space it was shocking, thrilling, amazing th edit i wrote the 4 star review below before reading the fifth appendix i mean, who could imagine that an appendix could change anything well, this one did all the chapters in the body of the book are 2 or 3 pages Appendix V is a 20 page essay, written 36 years after the rest of the book and just 3 years before einstein died it is a tour de force on the history, philosophy, and psychology i kid you not of the scientific understanding of empty space it was shocking, thrilling, amazing the book now gets 5 stars.careful, i think some editions don t have Appendix V.original 4 star review the subtitle of this slim book is a clear explanation that anyone can understand , but unfortunately i m afraid that s far from true there s not too much math in the book, but there is enough that anyone really needs to be replaced with any egghead but if you are already familiar with relativity, this is a great book, with lots of deep philosophical underpinnings as expounded my the man himself i found his writing style to be exquisite not too dry, not too colloquial.the treatment of special relativity is wonderful.but trying to teach general relativity in 45 pages with no math is just too tall an order he even warns us as things start to get rough I am guilty of a certain slovenliness of treatment, which as we know from the special theory of relativity, is far from being unimportant and pardonable It is now high time that we remedy this defect but I would mention at the outset, that this matter lays no small claims on the patience and on the power of abstraction of the reader indeed, the treatment of GR is in very broad strokes, with rather obscure connections still, quite enjoyable to find this readable text by one of my great heroes

  6. Robert Robert says:

    The aim of this book is to introduce people without a strong physics or even scientific background to the special and general theories of relativity theories that Einstein was the primary developer of Einstein assumes the reader has passes a university matriculation exam What that meant in the first half of the 20th Century, I don t know but in practice what s required is the level of algebra I had by age 16 plus a smattering of mentions of the square root of minus 1 I also found basic The aim of this book is to introduce people without a strong physics or even scientific background to the special and general theories of relativity theories that Einstein was the primary developer of Einstein assumes the reader has passes a university matriculation exam What that meant in the first half of the 20th Century, I don t know but in practice what s required is the level of algebra I had by age 16 plus a smattering of mentions of the square root of minus 1 I also found basic calculus useful for one section, though it is possible to do without it.For the most part this book is excellent, introducing the minimal amount of mathematics and formal language necessary to understand the most important and fundamental concepts of Einstein s theories in a way that is accessible whilst concise It might be possible to do it better with a bigger book, a less formal style and a lotdiagrams but it very interesting to get Einstein s unique perspective as originator of the theories and insight into his thought processes.A few sections are remarkable in contrast with the rest, for being unclear The section on addition of velocities in special relativity leaves ratherto the reader than anything else in the book, mathematically, and when I looked it up it turned out to be much easier to work out using basic calculus than algebraic division and the bit that wasn t clear was that a division of two equations was what was required This section could be skipped without losing much The remainder of the muddy sections come at the back end of the section on general relativity The simplest precise mathematical formulation of this theory is expressed using tensors and tensor algebra is way beyond what anybody encounters in standard school maths or physics curricula Einstein makes no attempt to explain it and in fact never shows the fundamental equation of general relativity This makes it very hard for him to explain how gravitational fields and space time interact, which leads to the lack of clarity in the latter stages of this part of the book Things get easier and clearer again when he moves on to relativity and cosmology.The final part of the book is a collection of appendices expanding on things discussed earlier on I required pen and paper to check the derivation of the Lorentz Transformations from first principles but this section could just be skipped if the maths bothers you it doesn t add a lot but it is interesting to see it, if your algebra is up to it.The most rewarding thing for me, since nothing here is completely new to me, was listening to Einstein s voice He seemed to come at things from a viewpoint muchgenerally philosophical than most present day physicists would, discussing Kant, Descartes and Hume, for instance The section on the concept of empty space was fascinating he concludes that general relativity precludes this notion one cannot have space time without it containing fields What he means is fields of force the electromagnetic field, gravitational field etc This implies the notion of a field being present even if its magnitude is zero which is a bizarre concept Modern quantum mechanics backs these ideas to the hilt and leads me to think that one of the most important areas of inquiry for fundamental physics as it stands is the connection between the classical idea of space time and the quantum idea of the vacuum The fundamental nature of both is obscure and in some sense they should be the same thing.Overall this is an excellent introduction to special relativity and at least the conceptual underpinnings of general relativity, if not of the full theory, which really just can t be explained properly without knowledge of tensors

  7. Adam Adam says:

    The theory of relativity is amazing and important, but contrary to what the tagline says, Einstein himself is probably not the best person to have explain it to you I read this class for Freshman Studies in college, and I honestly have to admit that I wouldn t have gotten much of it without the significant aid of in depth lectures and classroom discussions This is not because the ideas themselves are too complex, but because Einstein fails in his attempt to make his ideas understood to a layma The theory of relativity is amazing and important, but contrary to what the tagline says, Einstein himself is probably not the best person to have explain it to you I read this class for Freshman Studies in college, and I honestly have to admit that I wouldn t have gotten much of it without the significant aid of in depth lectures and classroom discussions This is not because the ideas themselves are too complex, but because Einstein fails in his attempt to make his ideas understood to a layman I don t know what book you ought to read instead, but there are certainly many alternatives, of which some must be good Einstein does not assume any knowledge of physics, but he does kind of glide over what his variables mean or where they come from, and this makes it hard to grasp what the math means and how it fits in

  8. Sanjay Gautam Sanjay Gautam says:

    This book by Dr Einstein is very well written, though you will find the anatomy of sentences a little unusual Well this should not be a problem considering the theory s difficulty level Though the theory is very simple mathematically special theory of relativity I m talking about , but the case is reverse when it comes to understand it intuitively It defies the common sense And that s what the book is about It changes your outlook, the way you see the nature and gives you a new and better This book by Dr Einstein is very well written, though you will find the anatomy of sentences a little unusual Well this should not be a problem considering the theory s difficulty level Though the theory is very simple mathematically special theory of relativity I m talking about , but the case is reverse when it comes to understand it intuitively It defies the common sense And that s what the book is about It changes your outlook, the way you see the nature and gives you a new and better understanding

  9. Erik Graff Erik Graff says:

    As a kid my serious interests were scientific I collected feathers, insects, rocks and fossils maintained an aerospace scrapbook kept a journal about space exploration and read a lot of science books ranging from popular stuff and textbooks to serious works from the library which I hardly understood My greatest intellectual interests by junior high were in cosmology and astronomy.During middle school, or possibly during the freshman year in high school, I started going to the library to rea As a kid my serious interests were scientific I collected feathers, insects, rocks and fossils maintained an aerospace scrapbook kept a journal about space exploration and read a lot of science books ranging from popular stuff and textbooks to serious works from the library which I hardly understood My greatest intellectual interests by junior high were in cosmology and astronomy.During middle school, or possibly during the freshman year in high school, I started going to the library to read Einstein Like many, I thought him the ne plus ultra and believed that mastering his work was of great importance Having learned some algebra, trigonometry and geometry in school, I was able to read a little bit of his notation, but not much Basically, it was beyond me.In high school, starting freshman year, geopolitical concerns started commanding my attention I d been raised under the mushroom cloud like the rest of my generation and we were at war in southeast Asia History and politics seemedimportant, ethically and personally, than science Sopho Chemistry sealed the matter My lab skills were terrible, the teacher was poor, the textbook boring That was my last physical science class until a single physics course in college.Being laid off from Loyola and working now only part time gave me the opportunity to pursue some of the things I d foregone So, I picked up Einstein s Relativity, a book he wrote about the relativity theory for the general public

  10. Owlseyes Owlseyes says:

    The Times from Nov 10, 1919, left Nov 16, 1919, center and Dec 3, 1919 He was living alone A friend, Janos Plesch, once said, He sleeps until he is awakened he stays awake until he is told to go to bed he will go hungry until he is given something to eat and then he eats until he is stopped In A Century Ago, Einstein s Theory of Relativity Changed EverythingBy DENNIS OVERBYENOV 24, 2015http www.nytimes.com 2015 11 24 sciAwesome, see here The Times from Nov 10, 1919, left Nov 16, 1919, center and Dec 3, 1919 He was living alone A friend, Janos Plesch, once said, He sleeps until he is awakened he stays awake until he is told to go to bed he will go hungry until he is given something to eat and then he eats until he is stopped In A Century Ago, Einstein s Theory of Relativity Changed EverythingBy DENNIS OVERBYENOV 24, 2015http www.nytimes.com 2015 11 24 sciAwesome, see here

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