Edens Lost Kindle Þ

Edens Lost Kindle Þ


10 thoughts on “Edens Lost

  1. Sammy Sammy says:

    Sumner Locke Elliott's third novel continues the career of a writer who was in his time vastly underrated but who has aged poorly in some ways To the positive Elliott's delicate shading of character is stronger here than in his previous two novels Orphaned Angus journeys to the Blue Mountains to stay with the St James family ruled over by cold fish Eve the matriarch who has lost her youthful passion in favour of a cool detachment Her daughter Stevie has inherited Eve's passion but it is wasted on the beautiful young man she falls for who is unbeknownst to Stevie gay Elliott's first book Careful He Might Hear You had been a fictionalised version of his own childhood; here Edens Lost feels like a seuel telling the tale of young adults in love The interesting difference here is that while the ueer Marcus is clearly a stand in for the author Elliott is also to be found in the other St James daughter Bea Bea has hidden her desires for physical and emotional connection by retreating to her creative pursuits She is writing for radio dramas and gradually developing a career out of this But her rational intellectual point of view is challenged when she meets an American serviceman Edens Lost is an engaging read and feels purposeful than the forgettable second novel in the Elliott canon Some Doves and Pythons Still fifty years after publication it feels woefully archaic I read a review that described the book as strictly matinee entertainment and I think that's the problem here Elliott was an immensely talented and creative writer; he had made his name for years in radio serials and live television dramas so he knew how to spin several plates before bringing them down together and he knew how to conjure up engaging dialogue and plots But despite some fetching attempts at modernism he is not a particularly literary writer Most enervating of all is Elliott's habit of directing the reader to how dialogue is spoken Words and sometimes individual syllables are italicised; the radio dramatist doesn't trust his own dialogue without an actor to interpret it As a result Edens Lost feels like a high class airport novel Of the three sections the second Bea's is by far the most successful clearly connecting to the writer's own sense of self This is the kind of novel to pass the time on a train journey or perhaps better yet on a rained in weekend at a hotel with a partner you are secretly planning to abandon for a attractive new lover If you're not in that situation though don't worry about it


  2. Michael Burge Michael Burge says:

    The best part of this fascinating book is Part Two Bea a hidden gem inside what is an often hard read due to being a detailed study in human frailty expressed in well human frailty barely expressed Nevertheless it's a must read Elliott tackles a study of the chauvinistic foundations of western society and how it governs female expression Perhaps it's because Bea is the character who fights it with the most pluck which makes Part Two so effective?


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Edens Lost ✤ Edens Lost Download ➸ Author Sumner Locke Elliott – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Come to us Mrs St James had said To seventeen year old Angus alone orphaned restless it is a tempting invitation Talk of Hitler and war looms ominously in the air and Angus is bored with his dreary li Come to us Mrs St James had said To seventeen year old Angus alone orphaned restless it is a tempting invitation Talk of Hitler and war looms ominously in the air and Angus is bored with his dreary life in the city Drawn by the fascination of the off beat St James family he goes to live with them in the Blue MountainsAt first he is delighted and awed by his new friends but graduallly the glamour fades and reality exposes their individual flawsOver the years the magnetism remains and it proves to be one from which he is unable or unwilling to escape.

  • Edens Lost
  • Sumner Locke Elliott
  • 27 August 2015
  • 9780725103705

About the Author: Sumner Locke Elliott

Elliott was born in Sydney in to the writer Helena Sumner Locke and the journalist Henry Logan Elliott His mother died of eclampsia one day after his birth Elliott was raised by his aunts who had a fierce custody battle over him fictionalized in Elliott's autobiographical novel Careful He Might Hear You Elliott was educated at Cranbrook School in Bellevue Hill SydneyElliott began act.


10 thoughts on “Edens Lost

  1. Sammy Sammy says:

    Sumner Locke Elliott's third novel continues the career of a writer who was in his time vastly underrated but who has aged poorly in some ways To the positive Elliott's delicate shading of character is stronger here than in his previous two novels Orphaned Angus journeys to the Blue Mountains to stay with the St James family ruled over by cold fish Eve the matriarch who has lost her youthful passion in favour of a cool detachment Her daughter Stevie has inherited Eve's passion but it is wasted on the beautiful young man she falls for who is unbeknownst to Stevie gay Elliott's first book Careful He Might Hear You had been a fictionalised version of his own childhood; here Edens Lost feels like a seuel telling the tale of young adults in love The interesting difference here is that while the ueer Marcus is clearly a stand in for the author Elliott is also to be found in the other St James daughter Bea Bea has hidden her desires for physical and emotional connection by retreating to her creative pursuits She is writing for radio dramas and gradually developing a career out of this But her rational intellectual point of view is challenged when she meets an American serviceman Edens Lost is an engaging read and feels purposeful than the forgettable second novel in the Elliott canon Some Doves and Pythons Still fifty years after publication it feels woefully archaic I read a review that described the book as strictly matinee entertainment and I think that's the problem here Elliott was an immensely talented and creative writer; he had made his name for years in radio serials and live television dramas so he knew how to spin several plates before bringing them down together and he knew how to conjure up engaging dialogue and plots But despite some fetching attempts at modernism he is not a particularly literary writer Most enervating of all is Elliott's habit of directing the reader to how dialogue is spoken Words and sometimes individual syllables are italicised; the radio dramatist doesn't trust his own dialogue without an actor to interpret it As a result Edens Lost feels like a high class airport novel Of the three sections the second Bea's is by far the most successful clearly connecting to the writer's own sense of self This is the kind of novel to pass the time on a train journey or perhaps better yet on a rained in weekend at a hotel with a partner you are secretly planning to abandon for a attractive new lover If you're not in that situation though don't worry about it

  2. Michael Burge Michael Burge says:

    The best part of this fascinating book is Part Two Bea a hidden gem inside what is an often hard read due to being a detailed study in human frailty expressed in well human frailty barely expressed Nevertheless it's a must read Elliott tackles a study of the chauvinistic foundations of western society and how it governs female expression Perhaps it's because Bea is the character who fights it with the most pluck which makes Part Two so effective?

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *