Paperback è The Godwhale eBook Þ

Paperback è The Godwhale eBook Þ


The Godwhale ❮Download❯ ✤ The Godwhale Author T.J. Bass – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Rorqual Maru was a cyborg part organic whale, part mechanised ship and part god She was a harvester a vast plankton rake, now without a crop, abandoned by earth society when the seas died So she selec Rorqual Maru was a cyborg part organic whale, part mechanised ship and part god She was a harvester a vast plankton rake, now without a crop, abandoned by earth society when the seas died So she selected an island for her grave, hoping to keep her carcass visible for salvage Although her long ear heard nothing, she believed that man still lived in his hive If he should ever return to the sea, she wanted to serve She longed for the thrill of a human s bare feet touching the skin of her deck She missed the hearty hails, the sweat and the laughter She needed mankind But all humans were long gone or were they.

    Load results Apple Footer Apple Support ear heard nothing, she believed that man still lived in his hive If he should ever return to the sea, she wanted to serve She longed for the thrill of a human s bare feet touching the skin of her deck She missed the hearty hails, the sweat and the laughter She needed mankind But all humans were long gone or were they."/>
  • Paperback
  • 286 pages
  • The Godwhale
  • T.J. Bass
  • English
  • 07 March 2018
  • 057512993X

About the Author: T.J. Bass

Thomas Joseph Bassler, author of health diet related non fiction under the name Thomas J Bassler.



10 thoughts on “The Godwhale

  1. James Hoff James Hoff says:

    Don t be fooled by the title The godhwhale itself is only a portion of this epic, century spanning book Chock full of ideas, hard science, and details, the Godwhale is no less than a masterpiece It is SF on a HUGE scale If you ve never heard of it, don t let this deter you The Godwhale is one of SF s lesser known classics.

  2. Geoffery Crescent Geoffery Crescent says:

    The Godwhale came to me in a stack of classic sci fi paperbacks, mostly Asimov and Wyndham and Vogt and the like It stood out, party because of its relatively large size and its bizarre cover art, and it came complete with a recommendation from my Dad, who remembered reading it years ago The problem being, of course, that stack of books didn t contain Half past Human, the novel preceding the Godwhale A quick Google search taught me the difference between the four toed Nebish and the five toed The Godwhale came to me in a stack of classic sci fi paperbacks, mostly Asimov and Wyndham and Vogt and the like It stood out, party because of its relatively large size and its bizarre cover art, and it came complete with a recommendation from my Dad, who remembered reading it years ago The problem being, of course, that stack of books didn t contain Half past Human, the novel preceding the Godwhale A quick Google search taught me the difference between the four toed Nebish and the five toed Benthics, and on I went, only partially confused by prior events The book does not lend itself well to coherent reading Time passes in a seemingly random manner, minutes and years pass alike without any reference in text The plot follows the unfolding of a series of events, rather than characters, which meant just as you were getting to know one group of people the action would pass to another My copy also had frequent grammatical errors speech marks were scattered at random throughout.The Godwhale does have a lot to recommend it however Like all the best classic sci fi, there s an ecological message in there about our destructive influence on Earth s ecology The blend of biology and technology is unusual and well done, and a bizarre cast of characters rounds everything out Once you realise the plot is going to meander all over the place without their help, you find yourself content to sit back and enjoy the exploits of King ARNOLD and his sexy chicken brain washing adventures and Larry the mechanical centaur It s as weird as it sounds Actually Larry is one of my favourite things about this novel He gets crushed in half at the beginning of the book, so he agrees to be frozen in suspension until a decent set of working genitals can be found for him After a rude awakening in the wrong future, he spends the majority of his time crawling around on his hands, serving as adviser and historic badass in equal measure, like acompetent version of Fry from Futurama Well written disabled characters are rare in genre fiction, and Larry is never just the one looking to walk again And his girlfriend is a robotic fruit machine Yeah There s a doozy of a twist at the end as well, and it s not just it was Earth all along which was a bit of a staple of sci fi at the time A good read then, not the most cohesive, but defintely one of theimaginative pulps I ve ever read

  3. Peter Pier Peter Pier says:

    Post apocalyptic That was my first real SF book, I love it dearly Regarding it being written in the 70ies, it s quite amazing regarding the amount of AI I say, recommended, including it s predecessor, Half Past Human T.J Bass delivered a tremendous work.What I learned humankind will never fit into a tupperware box.Peter

  4. Gaby Gaby says:

    I massively enjoyed this one Only thing I didn t like was ARNOLD who essentially seemed to come in and dump patriarchy all over ainteresting society I also wish the Godwhale herself had hadof a complex vocal role but still a ton of fun reading it.

  5. Dragoonfliy Dragoonfliy says:

    I read this book years ago and decided abruptly to find it again and re read it It s surprisingly dense for such a small book, and covers and vast swathe of science fiction concepts in simply the first few chapters Still enjoyed it the second time around, though I found some sections to be predictable cliche Despite this many of the ideas presented are still pretty novel and entertaining to read about.

  6. John Fritz John Fritz says:

    Been so long since I read this but it struck a chord so that after all these years I still remember Augmented Renal Nucleus of Larry Dever and bots and warbles.

  7. Lea Lea says:

    lives on in memory for years

  8. Joanie Bassler Joanie Bassler says:

    I wasn t going to write a review for this book, because I had read it years ago and felt that most of the reviews, did it justice However, upon reading somerecent reviews that mention the rape scene plus the fact that the scene is focused on in the Forward I wanted to share my view on this I do not want that one event to overshadow the rest of the book and cause potential readers to turn away from this novel Rape is a heinous crime, in all of its forms I m not denying that Bu I wasn t going to write a review for this book, because I had read it years ago and felt that most of the reviews, did it justice However, upon reading somerecent reviews that mention the rape scene plus the fact that the scene is focused on in the Forward I wanted to share my view on this I do not want that one event to overshadow the rest of the book and cause potential readers to turn away from this novel Rape is a heinous crime, in all of its forms I m not denying that But the incident in this book is not gratuitous or explicit, it is a quick pounce and not treated as a rape for very explicit reasons, not because the author was blind to it At least I don t think he was.The rape occurs in order to illustrate who ARNOLD was and how he had been programmed by the Hive I think the assault and his subsequent behavior illustrated how well the Hives conditioning and brainwashing worked They created him for a very specific reason As some reviewers have pointed out, Arnold seems to take over the story and eclipses the better,interesting characters, but I think there is a message in there Perhaps a cautionary tale What about the future world that Bass created Dead oceans, sterile genetically altered plants, test tube babies, the Hive society and the Benthic society Are we killing our oceans Does society program our behavior If we had a population like the Benthics, would they be over run by modern man The book was written over 40 years ago before the computers, invitro fertilization, genetically modified foods, the dying oceans that we have today Like so many of the SF books written back then, they were written for a young male audience, have mostly male protagonists, and have a lotgoing on than androcentric or misogynistic attitudes We see speculation, extrapolation, and technology that is sometimes unbelievable but sometimes scarily close to what we see today There is a reason his two books were nominated for Nebula Awards the same reason Orion brought them back into print Science Fiction fans enjoyed reading them

  9. Jonathan Jonathan says:

    Although it was written in the seventies The Godwhale is still a surprisingly relevant science fiction novel Many of the themes explored are very much a product of its time, but themes of morality, economics and prejudice attitudes are still apt today The most relevant theme of all is how to cope with overpopulation, which is a problem we are sure to face in the future, namely how to provide enough food to feed so many people This has many echoes with our own world as it is estimated that Although it was written in the seventies The Godwhale is still a surprisingly relevant science fiction novel Many of the themes explored are very much a product of its time, but themes of morality, economics and prejudice attitudes are still apt today The most relevant theme of all is how to cope with overpopulation, which is a problem we are sure to face in the future, namely how to provide enough food to feed so many people This has many echoes with our own world as it is estimated that the global population will rise to over 10 billion by the midpoint of the century As well as such prescient themes, the language can be challenging at times, but not to the detriment of the story It is clear that the writer was once a doctor through his use of medical terms to reinforce the theory behind the pseudo science described here This adds a much greater level of believability rather than confusing the reader, a skill akin to the likes of the classic authors such as Jules Verne The characters that populate the story are not the most likeable, which is a reflection of the bleak and futile existence they endure It actually soothes many peoples fear of technology as the most likeable of the characters are Rorqual Maru, the Godwhale of the title, and Trilobite In fact the machines arehuman than the humans themselves, with the exception of Larry, the main protagonist and Drum The story asks many questions and doesn t supply all of the answers I will not reveal too much as I got the impression that the ending is very subjective It is a very personal experience and conclusions have to be drawn by the reader themselves Also for reasons unknown Bass never returned to the fascinating world he created and as he is sadly no longer with us he never will Ken Macleod s forward in this SF Masterworks edition concludes with an apt assessment of the books ending The doctor gave us the diagnosis, and the prognosis He left it for us to write the prescription

  10. Bill Ramsell Bill Ramsell says:

    This is a very important book It was written by a pathologist in 1974 he was also a genius and shaved his head to cut down on wind resistance when he ran marathons and describes a future Earth where humans have become littlethan insects in the Hive that rules the land surfaces of the planet It s a terrifying possible future, and apart from the odd mysticism and series of unlikely coincidences that drive the plot, a very good book It s certainly a refreshing change from all the zomb This is a very important book It was written by a pathologist in 1974 he was also a genius and shaved his head to cut down on wind resistance when he ran marathons and describes a future Earth where humans have become littlethan insects in the Hive that rules the land surfaces of the planet It s a terrifying possible future, and apart from the odd mysticism and series of unlikely coincidences that drive the plot, a very good book It s certainly a refreshing change from all the zombie dystopian future books which have, for some reason, become popular recently.This edition contains a great many typos, which is a bit disappointing I m considering a sternly worded letter to the editors That being said, this is a book worth reading

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10 thoughts on “The Godwhale

  1. James Hoff James Hoff says:

    Don t be fooled by the title The godhwhale itself is only a portion of this epic, century spanning book Chock full of ideas, hard science, and details, the Godwhale is no less than a masterpiece It is SF on a HUGE scale If you ve never heard of it, don t let this deter you The Godwhale is one of SF s lesser known classics.

  2. Geoffery Crescent Geoffery Crescent says:

    The Godwhale came to me in a stack of classic sci fi paperbacks, mostly Asimov and Wyndham and Vogt and the like It stood out, party because of its relatively large size and its bizarre cover art, and it came complete with a recommendation from my Dad, who remembered reading it years ago The problem being, of course, that stack of books didn t contain Half past Human, the novel preceding the Godwhale A quick Google search taught me the difference between the four toed Nebish and the five toed The Godwhale came to me in a stack of classic sci fi paperbacks, mostly Asimov and Wyndham and Vogt and the like It stood out, party because of its relatively large size and its bizarre cover art, and it came complete with a recommendation from my Dad, who remembered reading it years ago The problem being, of course, that stack of books didn t contain Half past Human, the novel preceding the Godwhale A quick Google search taught me the difference between the four toed Nebish and the five toed Benthics, and on I went, only partially confused by prior events The book does not lend itself well to coherent reading Time passes in a seemingly random manner, minutes and years pass alike without any reference in text The plot follows the unfolding of a series of events, rather than characters, which meant just as you were getting to know one group of people the action would pass to another My copy also had frequent grammatical errors speech marks were scattered at random throughout.The Godwhale does have a lot to recommend it however Like all the best classic sci fi, there s an ecological message in there about our destructive influence on Earth s ecology The blend of biology and technology is unusual and well done, and a bizarre cast of characters rounds everything out Once you realise the plot is going to meander all over the place without their help, you find yourself content to sit back and enjoy the exploits of King ARNOLD and his sexy chicken brain washing adventures and Larry the mechanical centaur It s as weird as it sounds Actually Larry is one of my favourite things about this novel He gets crushed in half at the beginning of the book, so he agrees to be frozen in suspension until a decent set of working genitals can be found for him After a rude awakening in the wrong future, he spends the majority of his time crawling around on his hands, serving as adviser and historic badass in equal measure, like acompetent version of Fry from Futurama Well written disabled characters are rare in genre fiction, and Larry is never just the one looking to walk again And his girlfriend is a robotic fruit machine Yeah There s a doozy of a twist at the end as well, and it s not just it was Earth all along which was a bit of a staple of sci fi at the time A good read then, not the most cohesive, but defintely one of theimaginative pulps I ve ever read

  3. Peter Pier Peter Pier says:

    Post apocalyptic That was my first real SF book, I love it dearly Regarding it being written in the 70ies, it s quite amazing regarding the amount of AI I say, recommended, including it s predecessor, Half Past Human T.J Bass delivered a tremendous work.What I learned humankind will never fit into a tupperware box.Peter

  4. Gaby Gaby says:

    I massively enjoyed this one Only thing I didn t like was ARNOLD who essentially seemed to come in and dump patriarchy all over ainteresting society I also wish the Godwhale herself had hadof a complex vocal role but still a ton of fun reading it.

  5. Dragoonfliy Dragoonfliy says:

    I read this book years ago and decided abruptly to find it again and re read it It s surprisingly dense for such a small book, and covers and vast swathe of science fiction concepts in simply the first few chapters Still enjoyed it the second time around, though I found some sections to be predictable cliche Despite this many of the ideas presented are still pretty novel and entertaining to read about.

  6. John Fritz John Fritz says:

    Been so long since I read this but it struck a chord so that after all these years I still remember Augmented Renal Nucleus of Larry Dever and bots and warbles.

  7. Lea Lea says:

    lives on in memory for years

  8. Joanie Bassler Joanie Bassler says:

    I wasn t going to write a review for this book, because I had read it years ago and felt that most of the reviews, did it justice However, upon reading somerecent reviews that mention the rape scene plus the fact that the scene is focused on in the Forward I wanted to share my view on this I do not want that one event to overshadow the rest of the book and cause potential readers to turn away from this novel Rape is a heinous crime, in all of its forms I m not denying that Bu I wasn t going to write a review for this book, because I had read it years ago and felt that most of the reviews, did it justice However, upon reading somerecent reviews that mention the rape scene plus the fact that the scene is focused on in the Forward I wanted to share my view on this I do not want that one event to overshadow the rest of the book and cause potential readers to turn away from this novel Rape is a heinous crime, in all of its forms I m not denying that But the incident in this book is not gratuitous or explicit, it is a quick pounce and not treated as a rape for very explicit reasons, not because the author was blind to it At least I don t think he was.The rape occurs in order to illustrate who ARNOLD was and how he had been programmed by the Hive I think the assault and his subsequent behavior illustrated how well the Hives conditioning and brainwashing worked They created him for a very specific reason As some reviewers have pointed out, Arnold seems to take over the story and eclipses the better,interesting characters, but I think there is a message in there Perhaps a cautionary tale What about the future world that Bass created Dead oceans, sterile genetically altered plants, test tube babies, the Hive society and the Benthic society Are we killing our oceans Does society program our behavior If we had a population like the Benthics, would they be over run by modern man The book was written over 40 years ago before the computers, invitro fertilization, genetically modified foods, the dying oceans that we have today Like so many of the SF books written back then, they were written for a young male audience, have mostly male protagonists, and have a lotgoing on than androcentric or misogynistic attitudes We see speculation, extrapolation, and technology that is sometimes unbelievable but sometimes scarily close to what we see today There is a reason his two books were nominated for Nebula Awards the same reason Orion brought them back into print Science Fiction fans enjoyed reading them

  9. Jonathan Jonathan says:

    Although it was written in the seventies The Godwhale is still a surprisingly relevant science fiction novel Many of the themes explored are very much a product of its time, but themes of morality, economics and prejudice attitudes are still apt today The most relevant theme of all is how to cope with overpopulation, which is a problem we are sure to face in the future, namely how to provide enough food to feed so many people This has many echoes with our own world as it is estimated that Although it was written in the seventies The Godwhale is still a surprisingly relevant science fiction novel Many of the themes explored are very much a product of its time, but themes of morality, economics and prejudice attitudes are still apt today The most relevant theme of all is how to cope with overpopulation, which is a problem we are sure to face in the future, namely how to provide enough food to feed so many people This has many echoes with our own world as it is estimated that the global population will rise to over 10 billion by the midpoint of the century As well as such prescient themes, the language can be challenging at times, but not to the detriment of the story It is clear that the writer was once a doctor through his use of medical terms to reinforce the theory behind the pseudo science described here This adds a much greater level of believability rather than confusing the reader, a skill akin to the likes of the classic authors such as Jules Verne The characters that populate the story are not the most likeable, which is a reflection of the bleak and futile existence they endure It actually soothes many peoples fear of technology as the most likeable of the characters are Rorqual Maru, the Godwhale of the title, and Trilobite In fact the machines arehuman than the humans themselves, with the exception of Larry, the main protagonist and Drum The story asks many questions and doesn t supply all of the answers I will not reveal too much as I got the impression that the ending is very subjective It is a very personal experience and conclusions have to be drawn by the reader themselves Also for reasons unknown Bass never returned to the fascinating world he created and as he is sadly no longer with us he never will Ken Macleod s forward in this SF Masterworks edition concludes with an apt assessment of the books ending The doctor gave us the diagnosis, and the prognosis He left it for us to write the prescription

  10. Bill Ramsell Bill Ramsell says:

    This is a very important book It was written by a pathologist in 1974 he was also a genius and shaved his head to cut down on wind resistance when he ran marathons and describes a future Earth where humans have become littlethan insects in the Hive that rules the land surfaces of the planet It s a terrifying possible future, and apart from the odd mysticism and series of unlikely coincidences that drive the plot, a very good book It s certainly a refreshing change from all the zomb This is a very important book It was written by a pathologist in 1974 he was also a genius and shaved his head to cut down on wind resistance when he ran marathons and describes a future Earth where humans have become littlethan insects in the Hive that rules the land surfaces of the planet It s a terrifying possible future, and apart from the odd mysticism and series of unlikely coincidences that drive the plot, a very good book It s certainly a refreshing change from all the zombie dystopian future books which have, for some reason, become popular recently.This edition contains a great many typos, which is a bit disappointing I m considering a sternly worded letter to the editors That being said, this is a book worth reading

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