All That Is Solid: The Great Housing Disaster Epub Ò

All That Is Solid: The Great Housing Disaster Epub Ò


All That Is Solid: The Great Housing Disaster ➶ [Read] ➲ All That Is Solid: The Great Housing Disaster By Danny Dorling ➾ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Housing was at the heart of the financial collapse, and our economy is now precariously reliant on the housing market In this groundbreaking new book, Danny Dorling argues that housing is the defining Housing was at the heart of the financial Is Solid: PDF ↠ collapse, and our economy is now precariously reliant on the housing market In this groundbreaking new book, Danny Dorling argues that housing is the defining issue of our times Tracing how we got to our current crisis and how housing has come to reflect class and wealth in All That Kindle - Britain, All That Is Solid radically shows that the solution to our problems rising homelessness, a generation priced out of home ownership is not, as is widely assumed, building homes Inequality, he argues, is what we really need to overcome.

  • Hardcover
  • All That Is Solid: The Great Housing Disaster
  • Danny Dorling
  • English
  • 10 June 2019

About the Author: Danny Dorling

Danny Dorling is a British social geographer researching Is Solid: PDF ↠ inequality and human geography He is the Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography of the School of Geography and the Environment of the University of OxfordDanny Dorling has lived all his life in England To try to counter his myopic world view, in , Danny started working with a All That Kindle - group of researchers on a project to remap the world worldmapperHe has published with many colleaguesthan a dozen books on issues related to social inequalities in Britain and several hundred journal papers Much of this work is available open access and will be added to this website soonHis work concerns issues of housing, health, employment, education and That Is Solid: MOBI ï poverty Danny was employed as a play worker in children s summer play schemes He learnt the ethos of pre school education where the underlying rationale was that playing is learning for living He tries not to forget this He is an Academician of the Academy of the Learned Societies in the Social Sciences, Honorary President of the Society of Cartographers and a patron of Roadpeace, the national charity for road crash victims.



10 thoughts on “All That Is Solid: The Great Housing Disaster

  1. Anna Anna says:

    Well, this is a deeply enraging book I recommend looking at pictures of happy dogs in order to promote calm after finishing it Housing is an especially vexed issue for me, as I used to work in local government in the time BC Before Crisis Before Coalition I had access to a lot of housing data and worked on issues relating to new housing development, as well as having a wise colleague who taught me huge amounts about the operation of the housing system Prior to the crisis, it was clear th Well, this is a deeply enraging book I recommend looking at pictures of happy dogs in order to promote calm after finishing it Housing is an especially vexed issue for me, as I used to work in local government in the time BC Before Crisis Before Coalition I had access to a lot of housing data and worked on issues relating to new housing development, as well as having a wise colleague who taught me huge amounts about the operation of the housing system Prior to the crisis, it was clear that there were major problems with housing in the UK Apart from anything else, I was living in a slummy shared rental managed by an actively malign rental agency That said, my rent was 25% lower than it is 5 years later, despite now living in another slummy shared rental further out of the centre of the same city At least my current rental agents are only passively malign When the crisis hit, there was massive concern in local government about the sudden cessation of new house building, sometimes quite literally in the middle of construction It was clear that a new approach to housing policy was needed to respond to the crisis and the underlying problems which it exacerbated Then the Coalition got in and every single housing policy they came up with did the opposite of what was needed My colleagues and I used to read aloud press releases from the Department of Communities and Local Government, asking each other, Don t they realise what will happen If Eric Pickles et al did realise, they did not care about the homelessness, housing insecurity, and affordability crises they were encouraging Moreover, Mr Pickles department cut all funding for my colleagues and I, so we were made redundant en masse I took refuge in postgraduate education and began teaching undergraduates about housing, not without a certain bitter tone My PhD isn t about housing, though, as three years of sustained intense anger would have given me ulcers This extensive preamble is to set the context for my reading this book and my lack of neutrality on its subject matter All that is Solid did not tell me a great deal that I didn t already know and thus I found the initial chapters somewhat slow and meandering Personally, I would have structured a book of this kind a bit differently, perhaps based on the housing tenures or the roles played by housing shelter, real estate investment, etc Nonetheless, Dorling is a powerful writer and marshals an impressive breadth of information I wasn t as impressed by All that is Solid as Injustice Why social inequality persists, an earlier book of his which I highly recommend The main theme is the same, though Dorling traces the current UK housing crisis to the growth of inequality since the 1980s One of his key points, which I have not seen much discussion of elsewhere, is that there are considerablybedrooms than there are people in the UK Thus to speak of a housing shortage conceals the unequal distribution of not just housing but the space within it He also discusses Britain s appallingly feudal distribution of land ownership, which I also teach undergraduates about.The book s themes coalescedeffectively as it went on, culminating in a powerful ending Dorling takes a pleasingly pragmatic approach to policy solutions Rather than relying on small scale change co housing projects and the like , he advocates legal changes that would alter people s rights to housing and the power balance between landlords tenants He sees speculative investment in housing as anathema, which should not be so radical a view given the disastrous chaos of the 2007 8 financial meltdown Major reform of council tax, perhaps including the introduction of a land value tax, is also suggested The current council tax system is appallingly regressive Dorling also deplores the punitive and cruel cuts to benefits, such as the bedroom tax The most upsetting parts of the book discuss how the Coalition has targeted the most vulnerable, removing their safety net against homelessness Dorling connects this to increasing death rates amongst the elderly, a correlation I hadn t come across before.I highly recommend this book and on balance am glad that I read it, as Dorling had a constructive and interesting set of policy approaches to suggest that might improve the situation Unfortunately, hell will freeze over before the Coalition would contemplate any of them We must hope for ahumane and less ideologically blinkered government after the coming election With housing, I find that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing From my academic and professional experience, I understand why my living situations since I left home have been increasingly expensive yet of consistently poor quality I understand why I ve lived with mouldy walls, malfunctioning white goods, overcrowding, astronomical energy bills due to absent insulation, arbitrary fees, insecure tenancies, tiny rooms, and worn Ikea furnishings Yet this understanding is the very opposite of consolation I don t aspire to own a home and rent from the bank rather than an absent landlord, as the only obvious advantage would be non magnolia walls Dorling makes abundantly clear that the current housing system works in the favour of a rich minority and disadvantages everybody else to a greater or lesser degree Contemplating all this for any length of time inclines me to become a hermit and live in a yurt somewhere Or perhaps move to Scotland, where many of the creative fees contract fees, inventory fees, administrative fees, etc levied by rental agents are now illegal.Of course, I am one of the lucky ones I can afford my rent, as it s only about 40% of my income Compared to many, I am well housed Still, it s terrible how much the housing situation has deteriorated in past few decades For my generation, living somewhere with decent insulation, adequate space, and no mould problem is a major ambition I am two weeks away from my thirtieth birthday and have never rented anywhere that combined those three basic attributes Such luxury only exists at the most unaffordable end of the rental market And I don t even live in London, which takes the housing problems of other British urban areas to hyperbolic extremes Although I haven t said much about the book, if you ve waded through my rancor then I can safely recommend it to you To conclude, here is a quote that sets the current housing crisis neatly in wider context What each generation spends most of its money on changes over time Our grandparents spent faron food than on housing our parents often spenton cars than on housing We, however, spendon housing than on anything else Our children may on average spendon education unless they can stop that particular bubble from forming, but that is a subject for a future book

  2. Rich Burt Rich Burt says:

    Whilst I totally am on side with the authors politics, the incredible depth of research is often poorly presented in rambling and repetitive chapters I read another review that the delivery is akin to someone having a rant in a pub and at times it does come across a bit like that Still, it s a very enlightening book and I d recommend it for its factual content.

  3. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    A Karl Marx Freidrich Engels quote has inspired two book titles this year Soviet set novel All That is Solid Melts into Air by Darragh McKeon, and this expos of the British housing crisis The problem is not a dearth of housing, Dorling notes, but the inefficient distribution of that housing usually due to wealth inequality There are plenty of properties to go around, yet squatting and homelessness remain perpetual problems In addition, Britain has some of Europe s smallest new build hou A Karl Marx Freidrich Engels quote has inspired two book titles this year Soviet set novel All That is Solid Melts into Air by Darragh McKeon, and this expos of the British housing crisis The problem is not a dearth of housing, Dorling notes, but the inefficient distribution of that housing usually due to wealth inequality There are plenty of properties to go around, yet squatting and homelessness remain perpetual problems In addition, Britain has some of Europe s smallest new build houses, with noticeably tiny rooms, and this can have a surprisingly major psychological effect on inhabitants Nor does it help that council tax is heavily weighted against those in modest dwellings, and that the so called bedroom tax penalizes those on welfare benefits if they are found to have a spare room When rents are as high as they are in Britain today, most people who rent simply have to choose the least bad home they are offered That quote certainly struck a chord for me for over six years now, my husband and I have been stuck in a vicious cycle of renting non ideal properties that still end up costing nearly above our means Ironically, those who are most adversely affected by housing policy believe they have little power to alter politics And usually they are right I m not a citizen, so I can t vote my husband can and does vote, but his dissenting opinion has little bearing on local elections dominated by the Conservative Party Housing should be about the long term, about provision, not profit Amen Among the solutions Dorling suggests are the following increased wages, rent control, incremental council tax bands all the way up to Z, the decriminalization of squatting, and second homes being taxed at a much higher rate But all of these practical changes imply a much greater societal shift a change of heart and of focus for a government that is currently as far as we can tell by and for the rich.This is a very important book, one I hope will be influential among academics and lawmakers Some of the details of economics and demographics passed me by, which is why I skimmed it rather than reading the whole thing Owen Hatherley, reviewing the book in the Guardian, calls it an avalanche of graphs, statistics and stories of housing misery , but I wholeheartedly agree with the message and laud Dorling s courage and clarity

  4. Shane Brownie Shane Brownie says:

    Very disappointed with this Poor bordering on misleading use of evidence and charts Was hoping to see a robust argument but came away with opinion on selective statistics.

  5. Siobhan Markwell Siobhan Markwell says:

    Dorling exposes the toll that unaffordable housing is taking on our communities and national life He convincingly challenges the myths that perpetuate the status quo I would have liked to see an additional chapter documenting developments since it was published in 2014 and a bitdepth on the role that international money laundering via London s bricks and mortar plays in keeping the housing bubble inflated Otherwise, I think he should be essential reading for every A level student and un Dorling exposes the toll that unaffordable housing is taking on our communities and national life He convincingly challenges the myths that perpetuate the status quo I would have liked to see an additional chapter documenting developments since it was published in 2014 and a bitdepth on the role that international money laundering via London s bricks and mortar plays in keeping the housing bubble inflated Otherwise, I think he should be essential reading for every A level student and undergraduate in the land as it is they who will be paying the real price of the avaricious, dishonest behaviour of the present generation of property owners and landlords

  6. Ietrio Ietrio says:

    The main idea is rather simple takepower from the people and push that power to the chosen ones, the bureaucrats like Dorling Never mind that the current situation is precisely the result of a century of Dorlings making the choices for the people Like in the Soviet Union, the ideal Dorlin society is the one without unemployment everybody works and than people eat though their representatives.

  7. Anna Lavery Anna Lavery says:

    Informative book which makes your blood boil A book everyone in the UK should read Could beconcise Also screw rent controls just abolish landlords.

  8. Amy Amy says:

    Interesting book that is enlightening and certainly gave me a different perspective The incredible growth in house prices is incredible and concerning The writer is anticipating a crash but 3 years on there is no sign except at the super high end of the London market I did get a little frustrated as the book went on It is a little repetitive and one stat about half way though the book sounded incredulous For the first time whilst reading the book i checked the source and it was the Daily Interesting book that is enlightening and certainly gave me a different perspective The incredible growth in house prices is incredible and concerning The writer is anticipating a crash but 3 years on there is no sign except at the super high end of the London market I did get a little frustrated as the book went on It is a little repetitive and one stat about half way though the book sounded incredulous For the first time whilst reading the book i checked the source and it was the Daily Mail Seriously This then made me question the book a lotas this is not a credible source and it was ironic that a few pages later the author was slamming the Daily Mail for its criticism of a UN rapporteur from memory I m glad I read the book and it has definitely had an impact on me but the book could be about half the length and I m not convinced by all the arguments

  9. Kazimiera pendrey Kazimiera pendrey says:

    this was very interesting book it made me realise how little i knew about the realities of the soldiers when they landed on the beaches the personal stories of people and what a great loss of life there was i would recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in the second world war and the personal stories of people who lived through it

  10. !Tæmbuŝu !Tæmbuŝu says:

    Reviewed by The Guardian 14 Feb 2014 , The Independent 7 Mar 2014 Reviewed by The Guardian 14 Feb 2014 , The Independent 7 Mar 2014

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “All That Is Solid: The Great Housing Disaster

  1. Anna Anna says:

    Well, this is a deeply enraging book I recommend looking at pictures of happy dogs in order to promote calm after finishing it Housing is an especially vexed issue for me, as I used to work in local government in the time BC Before Crisis Before Coalition I had access to a lot of housing data and worked on issues relating to new housing development, as well as having a wise colleague who taught me huge amounts about the operation of the housing system Prior to the crisis, it was clear th Well, this is a deeply enraging book I recommend looking at pictures of happy dogs in order to promote calm after finishing it Housing is an especially vexed issue for me, as I used to work in local government in the time BC Before Crisis Before Coalition I had access to a lot of housing data and worked on issues relating to new housing development, as well as having a wise colleague who taught me huge amounts about the operation of the housing system Prior to the crisis, it was clear that there were major problems with housing in the UK Apart from anything else, I was living in a slummy shared rental managed by an actively malign rental agency That said, my rent was 25% lower than it is 5 years later, despite now living in another slummy shared rental further out of the centre of the same city At least my current rental agents are only passively malign When the crisis hit, there was massive concern in local government about the sudden cessation of new house building, sometimes quite literally in the middle of construction It was clear that a new approach to housing policy was needed to respond to the crisis and the underlying problems which it exacerbated Then the Coalition got in and every single housing policy they came up with did the opposite of what was needed My colleagues and I used to read aloud press releases from the Department of Communities and Local Government, asking each other, Don t they realise what will happen If Eric Pickles et al did realise, they did not care about the homelessness, housing insecurity, and affordability crises they were encouraging Moreover, Mr Pickles department cut all funding for my colleagues and I, so we were made redundant en masse I took refuge in postgraduate education and began teaching undergraduates about housing, not without a certain bitter tone My PhD isn t about housing, though, as three years of sustained intense anger would have given me ulcers This extensive preamble is to set the context for my reading this book and my lack of neutrality on its subject matter All that is Solid did not tell me a great deal that I didn t already know and thus I found the initial chapters somewhat slow and meandering Personally, I would have structured a book of this kind a bit differently, perhaps based on the housing tenures or the roles played by housing shelter, real estate investment, etc Nonetheless, Dorling is a powerful writer and marshals an impressive breadth of information I wasn t as impressed by All that is Solid as Injustice Why social inequality persists, an earlier book of his which I highly recommend The main theme is the same, though Dorling traces the current UK housing crisis to the growth of inequality since the 1980s One of his key points, which I have not seen much discussion of elsewhere, is that there are considerablybedrooms than there are people in the UK Thus to speak of a housing shortage conceals the unequal distribution of not just housing but the space within it He also discusses Britain s appallingly feudal distribution of land ownership, which I also teach undergraduates about.The book s themes coalescedeffectively as it went on, culminating in a powerful ending Dorling takes a pleasingly pragmatic approach to policy solutions Rather than relying on small scale change co housing projects and the like , he advocates legal changes that would alter people s rights to housing and the power balance between landlords tenants He sees speculative investment in housing as anathema, which should not be so radical a view given the disastrous chaos of the 2007 8 financial meltdown Major reform of council tax, perhaps including the introduction of a land value tax, is also suggested The current council tax system is appallingly regressive Dorling also deplores the punitive and cruel cuts to benefits, such as the bedroom tax The most upsetting parts of the book discuss how the Coalition has targeted the most vulnerable, removing their safety net against homelessness Dorling connects this to increasing death rates amongst the elderly, a correlation I hadn t come across before.I highly recommend this book and on balance am glad that I read it, as Dorling had a constructive and interesting set of policy approaches to suggest that might improve the situation Unfortunately, hell will freeze over before the Coalition would contemplate any of them We must hope for ahumane and less ideologically blinkered government after the coming election With housing, I find that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing From my academic and professional experience, I understand why my living situations since I left home have been increasingly expensive yet of consistently poor quality I understand why I ve lived with mouldy walls, malfunctioning white goods, overcrowding, astronomical energy bills due to absent insulation, arbitrary fees, insecure tenancies, tiny rooms, and worn Ikea furnishings Yet this understanding is the very opposite of consolation I don t aspire to own a home and rent from the bank rather than an absent landlord, as the only obvious advantage would be non magnolia walls Dorling makes abundantly clear that the current housing system works in the favour of a rich minority and disadvantages everybody else to a greater or lesser degree Contemplating all this for any length of time inclines me to become a hermit and live in a yurt somewhere Or perhaps move to Scotland, where many of the creative fees contract fees, inventory fees, administrative fees, etc levied by rental agents are now illegal.Of course, I am one of the lucky ones I can afford my rent, as it s only about 40% of my income Compared to many, I am well housed Still, it s terrible how much the housing situation has deteriorated in past few decades For my generation, living somewhere with decent insulation, adequate space, and no mould problem is a major ambition I am two weeks away from my thirtieth birthday and have never rented anywhere that combined those three basic attributes Such luxury only exists at the most unaffordable end of the rental market And I don t even live in London, which takes the housing problems of other British urban areas to hyperbolic extremes Although I haven t said much about the book, if you ve waded through my rancor then I can safely recommend it to you To conclude, here is a quote that sets the current housing crisis neatly in wider context What each generation spends most of its money on changes over time Our grandparents spent faron food than on housing our parents often spenton cars than on housing We, however, spendon housing than on anything else Our children may on average spendon education unless they can stop that particular bubble from forming, but that is a subject for a future book

  2. Rich Burt Rich Burt says:

    Whilst I totally am on side with the authors politics, the incredible depth of research is often poorly presented in rambling and repetitive chapters I read another review that the delivery is akin to someone having a rant in a pub and at times it does come across a bit like that Still, it s a very enlightening book and I d recommend it for its factual content.

  3. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    A Karl Marx Freidrich Engels quote has inspired two book titles this year Soviet set novel All That is Solid Melts into Air by Darragh McKeon, and this expos of the British housing crisis The problem is not a dearth of housing, Dorling notes, but the inefficient distribution of that housing usually due to wealth inequality There are plenty of properties to go around, yet squatting and homelessness remain perpetual problems In addition, Britain has some of Europe s smallest new build hou A Karl Marx Freidrich Engels quote has inspired two book titles this year Soviet set novel All That is Solid Melts into Air by Darragh McKeon, and this expos of the British housing crisis The problem is not a dearth of housing, Dorling notes, but the inefficient distribution of that housing usually due to wealth inequality There are plenty of properties to go around, yet squatting and homelessness remain perpetual problems In addition, Britain has some of Europe s smallest new build houses, with noticeably tiny rooms, and this can have a surprisingly major psychological effect on inhabitants Nor does it help that council tax is heavily weighted against those in modest dwellings, and that the so called bedroom tax penalizes those on welfare benefits if they are found to have a spare room When rents are as high as they are in Britain today, most people who rent simply have to choose the least bad home they are offered That quote certainly struck a chord for me for over six years now, my husband and I have been stuck in a vicious cycle of renting non ideal properties that still end up costing nearly above our means Ironically, those who are most adversely affected by housing policy believe they have little power to alter politics And usually they are right I m not a citizen, so I can t vote my husband can and does vote, but his dissenting opinion has little bearing on local elections dominated by the Conservative Party Housing should be about the long term, about provision, not profit Amen Among the solutions Dorling suggests are the following increased wages, rent control, incremental council tax bands all the way up to Z, the decriminalization of squatting, and second homes being taxed at a much higher rate But all of these practical changes imply a much greater societal shift a change of heart and of focus for a government that is currently as far as we can tell by and for the rich.This is a very important book, one I hope will be influential among academics and lawmakers Some of the details of economics and demographics passed me by, which is why I skimmed it rather than reading the whole thing Owen Hatherley, reviewing the book in the Guardian, calls it an avalanche of graphs, statistics and stories of housing misery , but I wholeheartedly agree with the message and laud Dorling s courage and clarity

  4. Shane Brownie Shane Brownie says:

    Very disappointed with this Poor bordering on misleading use of evidence and charts Was hoping to see a robust argument but came away with opinion on selective statistics.

  5. Siobhan Markwell Siobhan Markwell says:

    Dorling exposes the toll that unaffordable housing is taking on our communities and national life He convincingly challenges the myths that perpetuate the status quo I would have liked to see an additional chapter documenting developments since it was published in 2014 and a bitdepth on the role that international money laundering via London s bricks and mortar plays in keeping the housing bubble inflated Otherwise, I think he should be essential reading for every A level student and un Dorling exposes the toll that unaffordable housing is taking on our communities and national life He convincingly challenges the myths that perpetuate the status quo I would have liked to see an additional chapter documenting developments since it was published in 2014 and a bitdepth on the role that international money laundering via London s bricks and mortar plays in keeping the housing bubble inflated Otherwise, I think he should be essential reading for every A level student and undergraduate in the land as it is they who will be paying the real price of the avaricious, dishonest behaviour of the present generation of property owners and landlords

  6. Ietrio Ietrio says:

    The main idea is rather simple takepower from the people and push that power to the chosen ones, the bureaucrats like Dorling Never mind that the current situation is precisely the result of a century of Dorlings making the choices for the people Like in the Soviet Union, the ideal Dorlin society is the one without unemployment everybody works and than people eat though their representatives.

  7. Anna Lavery Anna Lavery says:

    Informative book which makes your blood boil A book everyone in the UK should read Could beconcise Also screw rent controls just abolish landlords.

  8. Amy Amy says:

    Interesting book that is enlightening and certainly gave me a different perspective The incredible growth in house prices is incredible and concerning The writer is anticipating a crash but 3 years on there is no sign except at the super high end of the London market I did get a little frustrated as the book went on It is a little repetitive and one stat about half way though the book sounded incredulous For the first time whilst reading the book i checked the source and it was the Daily Interesting book that is enlightening and certainly gave me a different perspective The incredible growth in house prices is incredible and concerning The writer is anticipating a crash but 3 years on there is no sign except at the super high end of the London market I did get a little frustrated as the book went on It is a little repetitive and one stat about half way though the book sounded incredulous For the first time whilst reading the book i checked the source and it was the Daily Mail Seriously This then made me question the book a lotas this is not a credible source and it was ironic that a few pages later the author was slamming the Daily Mail for its criticism of a UN rapporteur from memory I m glad I read the book and it has definitely had an impact on me but the book could be about half the length and I m not convinced by all the arguments

  9. Kazimiera pendrey Kazimiera pendrey says:

    this was very interesting book it made me realise how little i knew about the realities of the soldiers when they landed on the beaches the personal stories of people and what a great loss of life there was i would recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in the second world war and the personal stories of people who lived through it

  10. !Tæmbuŝu !Tæmbuŝu says:

    Reviewed by The Guardian 14 Feb 2014 , The Independent 7 Mar 2014 Reviewed by The Guardian 14 Feb 2014 , The Independent 7 Mar 2014

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *