Arctic Summer Kindle Þ Kindle Edition

Arctic Summer Kindle Þ Kindle Edition

Arctic Summer [Ebook] ➤ Arctic Summer By Damon Galgut – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk In , the SS Birmingham approaches India On board is Morgan Forster, novelist and man of letters, who is embarking on a journey of discovery As Morgan stands on deck, the promise of a strange new futur In , the SS Birmingham approaches India On board is Morgan Forster, novelist and man of letters, who is embarking on a journey of discovery As Morgan stands on deck, the promise of a strange new future begins to take shape before his eyes The seeds of a story start to gather at the corner of his mind a sense of impending menace, lust in close confines, under a h.


10 thoughts on “Arctic Summer

  1. Roger Brunyate Roger Brunyate says:

    Inside a Very Private ManI knew E M Forster at Cambridge That is to say, he allowed me to visit him in his rooms at King s College a couple of times in 1962, when I was a young undergraduate We talked about those few subjects on which he would willingly open up mainly music, art, and literature sufficiently removed from his own I found him genial, witty, and welcoming, but also extraordinarily private on any matter having to do with his life or work Many years later, after he was long dead Inside a Very Private ManI knew E M Forster at Cambridge That is to say, he allowed me to visit him in his rooms at King s College a couple of times in 1962, when I was a young undergraduate We talked about those few subjects on which he would willingly open up mainly music, art, and literature sufficiently removed from his own I found him genial, witty, and welcoming, but also extraordinarily private on any matter having to do with his life or work Many years later, after he was long dead, I got to know him in a different way, through adapting his novelWhere Angels Fear to Treadas an opera libretto The choices I had to make gave me a closer insight into Forster s mind as an artist, as I tried to work out not only what was most essential in what he wrote, but also tentatively what might lie behind the lines that he could not write I believe I have read all his fiction other than the incomplete Arctic Summer, whose title the South African writer Damon Galgut borrowed for his biographical novel I have now corrected that omission But I have never read a traditional biography of Forster, so this was a revelation, like seeing an old acquaintance in a new light, fresh but familiar at the same time.The novel opens just over a century ago and fifty years before I met him , on the steamship carrying Edward Morgan Forster on his first visit to India, in 1912 Immediately, I felt that Galgut had captured his personality just right his crumpled, second hand appearance, which made him seem like a tradesman of some kind his exquisite politeness his extraordinary reticence about personal matters of any kind, especially sexual ones On board ship, he meets a young army officer called Searight, who recognizes a kindred spirit in Morgan, and is not reticent at all The author, already famous from the success of his fourth published novel, Howards End, is both horrified and intrigued For although recognizing himself as a homosexual Galgut s period appropriate term is minorite and yearning for love, he would remain a virgin until he was 37.Galgut s approach is rather similar to what Colm T ib n did for Henry James in The Master, though he is less episodic and I thinkrevealing Both men, according to their authors, were attracted to young men of a lower class, though both struggled against expressing or even admitting it But unlike James, who easily assumed his status as a public figure, Galgut s Forster is a mass of insecurities, and feels himself something of a fraud He is also presented as a profoundly lonely man, seeking love and human companionship, but deterred from finding it because of the complications of his physical urges.Three of the long chapters which make up the meat of this book are named after men, all of other races, each of whom was important to Morgan at different phases of his life There is Masood, an Indian barrister of good family whom he tutored for admission to Oxford years before, and is now his chief reason for visiting India now Masood will give much, but he cannot give him all Then there is Mohammed, a tram conductor whom Morgan befriends during the years he spends in Alexandria during the War, working for the Red Cross And finally Bapu Sahib, the Indian Mahahrajah who invites Morgan to his court as Private Secretary in the early 1920 s theirs is by no means a sexual relationship, but based on mutual respect and fondness it also coincides with what was probably the least closeted period of Forster s life.For the inability to let go emotionally is what Forster sees as the besetting handicap of the English upper middle class, entrenched behind walls of xenophobia and convention It is the subject of his early novels such as Where Angels Fear to Tread Even knowing that book as well as I do, Galgut gave me new insights I understood the magnetic charm of the Italian ruffian, Gino Carella, and his effect on the hero, Philip Herriton I also understood that Philip could noadmit these things than could Forster himself, also still trapped in the middle class proprieties of his mother s world But away from England, in each of his voyages East, to India, Egypt, and India again, he found himself loosening upandHis masterpiece, A Passage to India, went far to expressing the contrasts, not just between two cultures but two sides of his personality But it did not resolve them one of Galgut s most impressive scenes is the one in which Forster realizes that the book must be built around an unsolved mystery And Morgan Forster never could resolve them in print He lived for 46 years longer, but never wrote another novel.Galgut s book also made me sad How little I knew back then Withhomework, for instance, I could have asked Forster about his literary friends, Virginia and Leonard Woolf, D H Lawrence, and C V Cavafy, all of whom figure in Galgut s book But he would have brushed me off with polite evasions For though I shared his conversation and his whiskey, I could never really know him Now, after reading this deeply perceptive novel, in some essential way I do The three act opera was composed by Mark Lanz Weiser It received its student premiere at the Peabody Conservatory in Balti in 1999 Its professional premiere was given by Opera San Jose in February, 2015


  2. Helle Helle says:

    Having recently read Damon Galgut s In A Strange Room, which was brilliant, and having a life long love of E.M Forster, I was prepared to love this novel about the English writer I liked it a lot but for some reason not quite as much as I loved The Master, a similar novel, in which Colm To b n eloquently and plausibly muses on Henry James s life and books.As in The Master, in which To b n calls his protagonist Henry, Galgut calls his hero Morgan throughout, lovingly as I interpreted it, and it Having recently read Damon Galgut s In A Strange Room, which was brilliant, and having a life long love of E.M Forster, I was prepared to love this novel about the English writer I liked it a lot but for some reason not quite as much as I loved The Master, a similar novel, in which Colm To b n eloquently and plausibly muses on Henry James s life and books.As in The Master, in which To b n calls his protagonist Henry, Galgut calls his hero Morgan throughout, lovingly as I interpreted it, and it brings the reader closer to him and his first name wasn t meant to be Edward anyway, Galgut tells us his father accidentally said his own name at the christening Had he been less absent minded, Forster s first name would have been the same as James s The title Arctic Summer was the title of a novel Forster never finished and seems fitting for this portrait of him, his last and unrevealed story, as it were It is part plausible story telling based on research and part Galgut s rendition of Forster s thoughts about his homosexuality and the two main loves of his life at least during the period that we follow him , Syed Ross Masood and Mohammed el Adl, and less so his thoughts about his books In a conversation with Virginia and Leonard Woolf at the end of the novel, Forster says that he isn t really a novelist Virginia agrees, Leonard does not For my own part, I would have liked a bitabout his novels.Galgut returns to India in this novel, and to travelling He creates a story in which Forster puts together his major works, but the novel builds up to the creation of what many consider to be Forster s masterpiece, A Passage to India Galgut s novel delineates the other novel s development and suggests where many of its ideas spring from It took Forster some twelve years to write he continually abandoned it, deeming his memories of India inauthentic, until he visited it again Lines from Passage are strewn throughout this novel as if Forster had picked up bits and pieces from conversations and events over the 12 years from its conception to its final composition, which he may well have done I recognized lines spoken by Dr Aziz and Dr Godbole, descriptions of Forster s journey to the Barabar Caves which became the Marabar Caves and his thoughts on the British Raj, many of which made Passage such an important book at the time Forster had the keenest eyes when it came to observing the English in India but also in depth knowledge of some of the differences between Hindus and Muslims in India and, thus, of the complexities of Indian politics at the time A lot of guess work is necessarily involved as to Forster s feelings of loss and inadequacy, his way of being a forlorn, gentle man unable to fathom, let alone experience, the depths of his own sexual desires We are reminded in the beginning of the novel that Wilde was imprisoned only 17 years previously Much of this is both probable and reasonable, but I felt less willing to grant Galgut the liberty of imagining Forster s small sexual encounters so explicitly It seemed intrusive somehow because Forster himself hid this part of himself from all but his closest friends, although I suspect that may have been one of Galgut s reasons for including them to imagine them out into the open And my need to protect Forster post humously is no doubt entirely misplaced this is art, after all but those were my feelings I have to admit that it also grated on my ears that the word nevertheless is used perhaps 20 times in the novel yet didn t work Or even so, however , leaving it out.In conclusion, though, I read this as an affective homage to Forster Like Forster and through painting this portrait of him Galgut explores human connections and travelling, two of my favourite topics At one point in the novel, Forster sees a sign in India which is characteristically misspelled and which comes to be a kind of theme in A Passage to India the memorable God si love, an orthographically inaccurate but quite wonderful way, to my mind, of reiterating the epigraph to Howards End Only connect


  3. ·Karen· ·Karen· says:

    You see, he told Morgan It s as I said Everything comes down to religion, and it s dull, dull, dull Religion is perhaps not the only element at work here What do you mean Oh yes, I see but even that part of it is dull A mixture of rapture and cowardice No action, but all that quivering Oh lawks a mercy I seem to have turned into one of those people who need something to happen occasionally in the books they are reading Beautifully, sensitively written But once laid down, it w You see, he told Morgan It s as I said Everything comes down to religion, and it s dull, dull, dull Religion is perhaps not the only element at work here What do you mean Oh yes, I see but even that part of it is dull A mixture of rapture and cowardice No action, but all that quivering Oh lawks a mercy I seem to have turned into one of those people who need something to happen occasionally in the books they are reading Beautifully, sensitively written But once laid down, it was hard to pick up again At first I blamed the excruciating font, the rough paper, my reddened streaming eyes I battled on, because I have loved Mr Galgut s work in the past But it really was a mixture of rapture and very understandable cowardice No action, but all that quivering


  4. Vit Babenco Vit Babenco says:

    Love had vexed his mind, making him irritable and irrational There was something in human affection that was at odds with reason, he thought, like a kind of mild insanity Moral qualms and shortage of willpower I believe Damon Galgut perfectly depicts his protagonist s drawbacks And he magically recreates psychological climate and an atmosphere of that long gone era That echo It played in his head at unexpected moments, repeating certain sounds and making nonsense of them But could you r Love had vexed his mind, making him irritable and irrational There was something in human affection that was at odds with reason, he thought, like a kind of mild insanity Moral qualms and shortage of willpower I believe Damon Galgut perfectly depicts his protagonist s drawbacks And he magically recreates psychological climate and an atmosphere of that long gone era That echo It played in his head at unexpected moments, repeating certain sounds and making nonsense of them But could you remember an echo Memory itself was like another kind of echo, everything duplicating endlessly, in shadow versions of itself And this is an aura of the place He didn t believe not really in the supernatural But he didn t entirely disbelieve either India scraped up to the surface a kind of buried animism in him, a propensity towards the mystical And an idea of happiness is always better than the happiness itself But the shame, he slowly realised, was part of the point Degradation had its own sensual power, and no sooner was he hurrying away from one encounter than his mind was leaping ahead to the next one In the morning when he woke up he was already breathless with anticipation and the hours passed with grinding slowness till the appointed time But the idea was farthrilling than the act, which was over almost as soon as it started E.M Forster was an unhappy man, tormented by his desires and doubts, and he lived a miserable life but his moral suffering did make a great writer out of him


  5. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    As a writer he d felt he had to provide answers, but India had reminded him that no answer would suffice There had been so much he d seen and heard in that country which had baffled him and which rational thinking couldn t penetrate Mystery was at the heart of things there and it would be at the heart of his novel too 3.5 This fictionalized account of the life of E.M Forster zeroes in on the drawn out composition of A Passage to India, which he began in 1913 but wouldn t complete and publis As a writer he d felt he had to provide answers, but India had reminded him that no answer would suffice There had been so much he d seen and heard in that country which had baffled him and which rational thinking couldn t penetrate Mystery was at the heart of things there and it would be at the heart of his novel too 3.5 This fictionalized account of the life of E.M Forster zeroes in on the drawn out composition of A Passage to India, which he began in 1913 but wouldn t complete and publish until 1924 In between he broke off to write Maurice only published posthumously , spent three years working in Egypt during the war, and served as a secretary to an Indian maharajah For as bold as he was able to be in his writing of Maurice, Morgan as he is known here was still a virgin at the time and fought with the idea that his homosexual urges were unnatural and disgusting India exerted a pull on him in part because his first great, unrequited love was for Syed Ross Masood, a young Indian man he tutored in Latin Though that relationship was never consummated, later ones with an Egyptian tram conductor and an Indian barber were.As fictionalized biographies of authors go, I d rate this somewhere between David Lodge s A Man of Parts H.G Wells and Colm T ib n s superior The Master Henry James all three books share a heavy focus on the author s sexuality Buggery in the colonies It wasn t noble is one of my favorite random snippets from this novel, and sums up, for me, its slightly prurient aftertaste Although Galgut gives an intimate and sympathetic picture of Forster s struggles to live and write as he wished to informed by his journals and letters as well as biographies and other secondary source material I found I had to force myself to keep going with a book that lacked a propulsive narrative I did enjoy reading about the inspirations and key decisions behind A Passage to India, which I read in a college course on the Modernists, but for me the best scenes featured meetings with other contemporary writers Leonard and Virginia Woolf, Cavafy, and especially D.H Lawrence


  6. notgettingenough notgettingenough says:

    The long is I suspect most people come to this as an EM Forster fan, whereas I m the contrary case This was the only Galgut I hadn t read when I picked it up in London a year orago On the other hand, I ve never read a thing by EM Forster other than his brilliant short story The Machine Stops.So enamoured am I of Galgut that when I bought this, I didn t even look at the back cover, only to discover when I sat down to begin it at home that it is a bio novel I was crestfallen I have a The long is I suspect most people come to this as an EM Forster fan, whereas I m the contrary case This was the only Galgut I hadn t read when I picked it up in London a year orago On the other hand, I ve never read a thing by EM Forster other than his brilliant short story The Machine Stops.So enamoured am I of Galgut that when I bought this, I didn t even look at the back cover, only to discover when I sat down to begin it at home that it is a bio novel I was crestfallen I have a historian s distaste for bio pics, biography, autobiography Why would a bio novel be any different What is it Some excuse to write a biography without doing the hard work Without having to bother with the facts Back on the shelf it sat, and sat And sat Until the other day when I came upon it soon after an experience which had given me a different perspective on this sort of book I read Infinity The Story of a Moment by Gabriel Josipovici, read it, loved it, and only subsequently discovered it was a bio novel.Rest here


  7. Eric Anderson Eric Anderson says:

    Sometimes the feeling of a novel resonates so strongly with my current emotional state that it s eerie It s that magical moment where consciousness becomes fused so tight with the narrative and the particular story becomes my own particular and universal True I had this sensation as I got into the thick of this novel s story It seems an unlikely place and person to feel so connected to Galgut s fictional imagining of writer EM Forster The novel mostly takes place between the publication Sometimes the feeling of a novel resonates so strongly with my current emotional state that it s eerie It s that magical moment where consciousness becomes fused so tight with the narrative and the particular story becomes my own particular and universal True I had this sensation as I got into the thick of this novel s story It seems an unlikely place and person to feel so connected to Galgut s fictional imagining of writer EM Forster The novel mostly takes place between the publication of Howard s End in 1910 and the publication of A Passage to India in 1924 Forster or Morgan as he is commonly called travels to India primarily to visit a man he s fallen in love with named Syed Ross Masood He experiences first hand the strained racial relations and the way imperialism was transforming at that time Having met in England when Morgan was tutoring him the pair became close friends, but never lovers as Masood denied Morgan s advances When Morgan returns to England he continues to live with his mother who is both his closest companion and worst enemy During the war Morgan takes up a position in Egypt and there meets the second great love of his life Mohammed Galgut carefully reconstructs the tentative relationships Morgan builds with other people, elucidating the suppressed sexuality of Morgan and the complexity of racial politics The story is overall a speculation on the events and emotions which fed into the difficult creation of A Passage to India as well as the novel Maurice which wasn t published until after the author s death.Read my full review of Arctic Summer by Damon Galgut on LonesomeReader


  8. Jay Jay says:

    I became much too close to the main character in this novel to be able to discuss the book with much objectivity In fact, at the end of the novel I knew that I would strangely miss accompanying the thoughts of Morgan Forster, or rather Damon Galgut s creation of E.M Forster Morgan s loneliness, his sense of being an outsider, his rather sad connections with those he comes to love are not unfamiliar to me in my own experiences and Galgut manages to bring out what elevates and enriches those ex I became much too close to the main character in this novel to be able to discuss the book with much objectivity In fact, at the end of the novel I knew that I would strangely miss accompanying the thoughts of Morgan Forster, or rather Damon Galgut s creation of E.M Forster Morgan s loneliness, his sense of being an outsider, his rather sad connections with those he comes to love are not unfamiliar to me in my own experiences and Galgut manages to bring out what elevates and enriches those experiences in a masterful way Damon Galgut got my attention with hisexperimental In a Strange Room , which I found fascinating and baffling After reading that book I noticed myself thinking back on it often with ever greater appreciation, but here in Arctic Summer I m shown a Damon Galgut who writestraditionally, and still makes the book linger after he s done Perhaps Arctic Summer will not be a huge literary milestone for Damon Galgut, mainly due to it s dominant concern with Forster s personal and intimate life as opposed to his writing But, for me this moving book about a rather gentle man has already been placed among my favorites


  9. Amanda Patterson Amanda Patterson says:

    I loved the idea of this book Damon Galgut fictionalises EM Forster s life between 1910 and 1924 It is the story behind the story of A Passage to India I wasn t quite sure how to review this book, so I made a list of the things I loved first I enjoyed reading about the literati of the time, and how EM Forster felt alienated It was interesting to find out about a famous writer s life through an empathetic novelist s eyes I was impressed by the research and time that went into creating the I loved the idea of this book Damon Galgut fictionalises EM Forster s life between 1910 and 1924 It is the story behind the story of A Passage to India I wasn t quite sure how to review this book, so I made a list of the things I loved first I enjoyed reading about the literati of the time, and how EM Forster felt alienated It was interesting to find out about a famous writer s life through an empathetic novelist s eyes I was impressed by the research and time that went into creating the novel, and I liked the idea of finding out about the way people thought in India and Egypt and England in the early 1900s.The book lacked something, though, and I think it had a lot to do with the sterile telling of the tale We stayed in EM Forster s head, and I had no sense of setting because of the lack of sensory details I also found the scenes in the book overly long and repetitive, which may be true to real life, but boring when you read them The magic was lost for me in that final third of the book I read A Passage to India at university and this story took me back to a very different place and version of myself It made me think of how we remember things, and how we change More importantly, it reminded me of how we never forget how we feel about certain things, even after many years have passed This made me wish Galgut had recreated somethingtangible, instead of seemingly following the infatuation with the unknown from Forster s famous novel


  10. Hugh Hugh says:

    A fascinating portrait of E.M Forster and his long struggle to produce A passage to India Galgut s prose is always well judged and readable, and it left me wanting to read Forster.


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10 thoughts on “Arctic Summer

  1. Roger Brunyate Roger Brunyate says:

    Inside a Very Private ManI knew E M Forster at Cambridge That is to say, he allowed me to visit him in his rooms at King s College a couple of times in 1962, when I was a young undergraduate We talked about those few subjects on which he would willingly open up mainly music, art, and literature sufficiently removed from his own I found him genial, witty, and welcoming, but also extraordinarily private on any matter having to do with his life or work Many years later, after he was long dead Inside a Very Private ManI knew E M Forster at Cambridge That is to say, he allowed me to visit him in his rooms at King s College a couple of times in 1962, when I was a young undergraduate We talked about those few subjects on which he would willingly open up mainly music, art, and literature sufficiently removed from his own I found him genial, witty, and welcoming, but also extraordinarily private on any matter having to do with his life or work Many years later, after he was long dead, I got to know him in a different way, through adapting his novelWhere Angels Fear to Treadas an opera libretto The choices I had to make gave me a closer insight into Forster s mind as an artist, as I tried to work out not only what was most essential in what he wrote, but also tentatively what might lie behind the lines that he could not write I believe I have read all his fiction other than the incomplete Arctic Summer, whose title the South African writer Damon Galgut borrowed for his biographical novel I have now corrected that omission But I have never read a traditional biography of Forster, so this was a revelation, like seeing an old acquaintance in a new light, fresh but familiar at the same time.The novel opens just over a century ago and fifty years before I met him , on the steamship carrying Edward Morgan Forster on his first visit to India, in 1912 Immediately, I felt that Galgut had captured his personality just right his crumpled, second hand appearance, which made him seem like a tradesman of some kind his exquisite politeness his extraordinary reticence about personal matters of any kind, especially sexual ones On board ship, he meets a young army officer called Searight, who recognizes a kindred spirit in Morgan, and is not reticent at all The author, already famous from the success of his fourth published novel, Howards End, is both horrified and intrigued For although recognizing himself as a homosexual Galgut s period appropriate term is minorite and yearning for love, he would remain a virgin until he was 37.Galgut s approach is rather similar to what Colm T ib n did for Henry James in The Master, though he is less episodic and I thinkrevealing Both men, according to their authors, were attracted to young men of a lower class, though both struggled against expressing or even admitting it But unlike James, who easily assumed his status as a public figure, Galgut s Forster is a mass of insecurities, and feels himself something of a fraud He is also presented as a profoundly lonely man, seeking love and human companionship, but deterred from finding it because of the complications of his physical urges.Three of the long chapters which make up the meat of this book are named after men, all of other races, each of whom was important to Morgan at different phases of his life There is Masood, an Indian barrister of good family whom he tutored for admission to Oxford years before, and is now his chief reason for visiting India now Masood will give much, but he cannot give him all Then there is Mohammed, a tram conductor whom Morgan befriends during the years he spends in Alexandria during the War, working for the Red Cross And finally Bapu Sahib, the Indian Mahahrajah who invites Morgan to his court as Private Secretary in the early 1920 s theirs is by no means a sexual relationship, but based on mutual respect and fondness it also coincides with what was probably the least closeted period of Forster s life.For the inability to let go emotionally is what Forster sees as the besetting handicap of the English upper middle class, entrenched behind walls of xenophobia and convention It is the subject of his early novels such as Where Angels Fear to Tread Even knowing that book as well as I do, Galgut gave me new insights I understood the magnetic charm of the Italian ruffian, Gino Carella, and his effect on the hero, Philip Herriton I also understood that Philip could noadmit these things than could Forster himself, also still trapped in the middle class proprieties of his mother s world But away from England, in each of his voyages East, to India, Egypt, and India again, he found himself loosening upandHis masterpiece, A Passage to India, went far to expressing the contrasts, not just between two cultures but two sides of his personality But it did not resolve them one of Galgut s most impressive scenes is the one in which Forster realizes that the book must be built around an unsolved mystery And Morgan Forster never could resolve them in print He lived for 46 years longer, but never wrote another novel.Galgut s book also made me sad How little I knew back then Withhomework, for instance, I could have asked Forster about his literary friends, Virginia and Leonard Woolf, D H Lawrence, and C V Cavafy, all of whom figure in Galgut s book But he would have brushed me off with polite evasions For though I shared his conversation and his whiskey, I could never really know him Now, after reading this deeply perceptive novel, in some essential way I do The three act opera was composed by Mark Lanz Weiser It received its student premiere at the Peabody Conservatory in Balti in 1999 Its professional premiere was given by Opera San Jose in February, 2015

  2. Helle Helle says:

    Having recently read Damon Galgut s In A Strange Room, which was brilliant, and having a life long love of E.M Forster, I was prepared to love this novel about the English writer I liked it a lot but for some reason not quite as much as I loved The Master, a similar novel, in which Colm To b n eloquently and plausibly muses on Henry James s life and books.As in The Master, in which To b n calls his protagonist Henry, Galgut calls his hero Morgan throughout, lovingly as I interpreted it, and it Having recently read Damon Galgut s In A Strange Room, which was brilliant, and having a life long love of E.M Forster, I was prepared to love this novel about the English writer I liked it a lot but for some reason not quite as much as I loved The Master, a similar novel, in which Colm To b n eloquently and plausibly muses on Henry James s life and books.As in The Master, in which To b n calls his protagonist Henry, Galgut calls his hero Morgan throughout, lovingly as I interpreted it, and it brings the reader closer to him and his first name wasn t meant to be Edward anyway, Galgut tells us his father accidentally said his own name at the christening Had he been less absent minded, Forster s first name would have been the same as James s The title Arctic Summer was the title of a novel Forster never finished and seems fitting for this portrait of him, his last and unrevealed story, as it were It is part plausible story telling based on research and part Galgut s rendition of Forster s thoughts about his homosexuality and the two main loves of his life at least during the period that we follow him , Syed Ross Masood and Mohammed el Adl, and less so his thoughts about his books In a conversation with Virginia and Leonard Woolf at the end of the novel, Forster says that he isn t really a novelist Virginia agrees, Leonard does not For my own part, I would have liked a bitabout his novels.Galgut returns to India in this novel, and to travelling He creates a story in which Forster puts together his major works, but the novel builds up to the creation of what many consider to be Forster s masterpiece, A Passage to India Galgut s novel delineates the other novel s development and suggests where many of its ideas spring from It took Forster some twelve years to write he continually abandoned it, deeming his memories of India inauthentic, until he visited it again Lines from Passage are strewn throughout this novel as if Forster had picked up bits and pieces from conversations and events over the 12 years from its conception to its final composition, which he may well have done I recognized lines spoken by Dr Aziz and Dr Godbole, descriptions of Forster s journey to the Barabar Caves which became the Marabar Caves and his thoughts on the British Raj, many of which made Passage such an important book at the time Forster had the keenest eyes when it came to observing the English in India but also in depth knowledge of some of the differences between Hindus and Muslims in India and, thus, of the complexities of Indian politics at the time A lot of guess work is necessarily involved as to Forster s feelings of loss and inadequacy, his way of being a forlorn, gentle man unable to fathom, let alone experience, the depths of his own sexual desires We are reminded in the beginning of the novel that Wilde was imprisoned only 17 years previously Much of this is both probable and reasonable, but I felt less willing to grant Galgut the liberty of imagining Forster s small sexual encounters so explicitly It seemed intrusive somehow because Forster himself hid this part of himself from all but his closest friends, although I suspect that may have been one of Galgut s reasons for including them to imagine them out into the open And my need to protect Forster post humously is no doubt entirely misplaced this is art, after all but those were my feelings I have to admit that it also grated on my ears that the word nevertheless is used perhaps 20 times in the novel yet didn t work Or even so, however , leaving it out.In conclusion, though, I read this as an affective homage to Forster Like Forster and through painting this portrait of him Galgut explores human connections and travelling, two of my favourite topics At one point in the novel, Forster sees a sign in India which is characteristically misspelled and which comes to be a kind of theme in A Passage to India the memorable God si love, an orthographically inaccurate but quite wonderful way, to my mind, of reiterating the epigraph to Howards End Only connect

  3. ·Karen· ·Karen· says:

    You see, he told Morgan It s as I said Everything comes down to religion, and it s dull, dull, dull Religion is perhaps not the only element at work here What do you mean Oh yes, I see but even that part of it is dull A mixture of rapture and cowardice No action, but all that quivering Oh lawks a mercy I seem to have turned into one of those people who need something to happen occasionally in the books they are reading Beautifully, sensitively written But once laid down, it w You see, he told Morgan It s as I said Everything comes down to religion, and it s dull, dull, dull Religion is perhaps not the only element at work here What do you mean Oh yes, I see but even that part of it is dull A mixture of rapture and cowardice No action, but all that quivering Oh lawks a mercy I seem to have turned into one of those people who need something to happen occasionally in the books they are reading Beautifully, sensitively written But once laid down, it was hard to pick up again At first I blamed the excruciating font, the rough paper, my reddened streaming eyes I battled on, because I have loved Mr Galgut s work in the past But it really was a mixture of rapture and very understandable cowardice No action, but all that quivering

  4. Vit Babenco Vit Babenco says:

    Love had vexed his mind, making him irritable and irrational There was something in human affection that was at odds with reason, he thought, like a kind of mild insanity Moral qualms and shortage of willpower I believe Damon Galgut perfectly depicts his protagonist s drawbacks And he magically recreates psychological climate and an atmosphere of that long gone era That echo It played in his head at unexpected moments, repeating certain sounds and making nonsense of them But could you r Love had vexed his mind, making him irritable and irrational There was something in human affection that was at odds with reason, he thought, like a kind of mild insanity Moral qualms and shortage of willpower I believe Damon Galgut perfectly depicts his protagonist s drawbacks And he magically recreates psychological climate and an atmosphere of that long gone era That echo It played in his head at unexpected moments, repeating certain sounds and making nonsense of them But could you remember an echo Memory itself was like another kind of echo, everything duplicating endlessly, in shadow versions of itself And this is an aura of the place He didn t believe not really in the supernatural But he didn t entirely disbelieve either India scraped up to the surface a kind of buried animism in him, a propensity towards the mystical And an idea of happiness is always better than the happiness itself But the shame, he slowly realised, was part of the point Degradation had its own sensual power, and no sooner was he hurrying away from one encounter than his mind was leaping ahead to the next one In the morning when he woke up he was already breathless with anticipation and the hours passed with grinding slowness till the appointed time But the idea was farthrilling than the act, which was over almost as soon as it started E.M Forster was an unhappy man, tormented by his desires and doubts, and he lived a miserable life but his moral suffering did make a great writer out of him

  5. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    As a writer he d felt he had to provide answers, but India had reminded him that no answer would suffice There had been so much he d seen and heard in that country which had baffled him and which rational thinking couldn t penetrate Mystery was at the heart of things there and it would be at the heart of his novel too 3.5 This fictionalized account of the life of E.M Forster zeroes in on the drawn out composition of A Passage to India, which he began in 1913 but wouldn t complete and publis As a writer he d felt he had to provide answers, but India had reminded him that no answer would suffice There had been so much he d seen and heard in that country which had baffled him and which rational thinking couldn t penetrate Mystery was at the heart of things there and it would be at the heart of his novel too 3.5 This fictionalized account of the life of E.M Forster zeroes in on the drawn out composition of A Passage to India, which he began in 1913 but wouldn t complete and publish until 1924 In between he broke off to write Maurice only published posthumously , spent three years working in Egypt during the war, and served as a secretary to an Indian maharajah For as bold as he was able to be in his writing of Maurice, Morgan as he is known here was still a virgin at the time and fought with the idea that his homosexual urges were unnatural and disgusting India exerted a pull on him in part because his first great, unrequited love was for Syed Ross Masood, a young Indian man he tutored in Latin Though that relationship was never consummated, later ones with an Egyptian tram conductor and an Indian barber were.As fictionalized biographies of authors go, I d rate this somewhere between David Lodge s A Man of Parts H.G Wells and Colm T ib n s superior The Master Henry James all three books share a heavy focus on the author s sexuality Buggery in the colonies It wasn t noble is one of my favorite random snippets from this novel, and sums up, for me, its slightly prurient aftertaste Although Galgut gives an intimate and sympathetic picture of Forster s struggles to live and write as he wished to informed by his journals and letters as well as biographies and other secondary source material I found I had to force myself to keep going with a book that lacked a propulsive narrative I did enjoy reading about the inspirations and key decisions behind A Passage to India, which I read in a college course on the Modernists, but for me the best scenes featured meetings with other contemporary writers Leonard and Virginia Woolf, Cavafy, and especially D.H Lawrence

  6. notgettingenough notgettingenough says:

    The long is I suspect most people come to this as an EM Forster fan, whereas I m the contrary case This was the only Galgut I hadn t read when I picked it up in London a year orago On the other hand, I ve never read a thing by EM Forster other than his brilliant short story The Machine Stops.So enamoured am I of Galgut that when I bought this, I didn t even look at the back cover, only to discover when I sat down to begin it at home that it is a bio novel I was crestfallen I have a The long is I suspect most people come to this as an EM Forster fan, whereas I m the contrary case This was the only Galgut I hadn t read when I picked it up in London a year orago On the other hand, I ve never read a thing by EM Forster other than his brilliant short story The Machine Stops.So enamoured am I of Galgut that when I bought this, I didn t even look at the back cover, only to discover when I sat down to begin it at home that it is a bio novel I was crestfallen I have a historian s distaste for bio pics, biography, autobiography Why would a bio novel be any different What is it Some excuse to write a biography without doing the hard work Without having to bother with the facts Back on the shelf it sat, and sat And sat Until the other day when I came upon it soon after an experience which had given me a different perspective on this sort of book I read Infinity The Story of a Moment by Gabriel Josipovici, read it, loved it, and only subsequently discovered it was a bio novel.Rest here

  7. Eric Anderson Eric Anderson says:

    Sometimes the feeling of a novel resonates so strongly with my current emotional state that it s eerie It s that magical moment where consciousness becomes fused so tight with the narrative and the particular story becomes my own particular and universal True I had this sensation as I got into the thick of this novel s story It seems an unlikely place and person to feel so connected to Galgut s fictional imagining of writer EM Forster The novel mostly takes place between the publication Sometimes the feeling of a novel resonates so strongly with my current emotional state that it s eerie It s that magical moment where consciousness becomes fused so tight with the narrative and the particular story becomes my own particular and universal True I had this sensation as I got into the thick of this novel s story It seems an unlikely place and person to feel so connected to Galgut s fictional imagining of writer EM Forster The novel mostly takes place between the publication of Howard s End in 1910 and the publication of A Passage to India in 1924 Forster or Morgan as he is commonly called travels to India primarily to visit a man he s fallen in love with named Syed Ross Masood He experiences first hand the strained racial relations and the way imperialism was transforming at that time Having met in England when Morgan was tutoring him the pair became close friends, but never lovers as Masood denied Morgan s advances When Morgan returns to England he continues to live with his mother who is both his closest companion and worst enemy During the war Morgan takes up a position in Egypt and there meets the second great love of his life Mohammed Galgut carefully reconstructs the tentative relationships Morgan builds with other people, elucidating the suppressed sexuality of Morgan and the complexity of racial politics The story is overall a speculation on the events and emotions which fed into the difficult creation of A Passage to India as well as the novel Maurice which wasn t published until after the author s death.Read my full review of Arctic Summer by Damon Galgut on LonesomeReader

  8. Jay Jay says:

    I became much too close to the main character in this novel to be able to discuss the book with much objectivity In fact, at the end of the novel I knew that I would strangely miss accompanying the thoughts of Morgan Forster, or rather Damon Galgut s creation of E.M Forster Morgan s loneliness, his sense of being an outsider, his rather sad connections with those he comes to love are not unfamiliar to me in my own experiences and Galgut manages to bring out what elevates and enriches those ex I became much too close to the main character in this novel to be able to discuss the book with much objectivity In fact, at the end of the novel I knew that I would strangely miss accompanying the thoughts of Morgan Forster, or rather Damon Galgut s creation of E.M Forster Morgan s loneliness, his sense of being an outsider, his rather sad connections with those he comes to love are not unfamiliar to me in my own experiences and Galgut manages to bring out what elevates and enriches those experiences in a masterful way Damon Galgut got my attention with hisexperimental In a Strange Room , which I found fascinating and baffling After reading that book I noticed myself thinking back on it often with ever greater appreciation, but here in Arctic Summer I m shown a Damon Galgut who writestraditionally, and still makes the book linger after he s done Perhaps Arctic Summer will not be a huge literary milestone for Damon Galgut, mainly due to it s dominant concern with Forster s personal and intimate life as opposed to his writing But, for me this moving book about a rather gentle man has already been placed among my favorites

  9. Amanda Patterson Amanda Patterson says:

    I loved the idea of this book Damon Galgut fictionalises EM Forster s life between 1910 and 1924 It is the story behind the story of A Passage to India I wasn t quite sure how to review this book, so I made a list of the things I loved first I enjoyed reading about the literati of the time, and how EM Forster felt alienated It was interesting to find out about a famous writer s life through an empathetic novelist s eyes I was impressed by the research and time that went into creating the I loved the idea of this book Damon Galgut fictionalises EM Forster s life between 1910 and 1924 It is the story behind the story of A Passage to India I wasn t quite sure how to review this book, so I made a list of the things I loved first I enjoyed reading about the literati of the time, and how EM Forster felt alienated It was interesting to find out about a famous writer s life through an empathetic novelist s eyes I was impressed by the research and time that went into creating the novel, and I liked the idea of finding out about the way people thought in India and Egypt and England in the early 1900s.The book lacked something, though, and I think it had a lot to do with the sterile telling of the tale We stayed in EM Forster s head, and I had no sense of setting because of the lack of sensory details I also found the scenes in the book overly long and repetitive, which may be true to real life, but boring when you read them The magic was lost for me in that final third of the book I read A Passage to India at university and this story took me back to a very different place and version of myself It made me think of how we remember things, and how we change More importantly, it reminded me of how we never forget how we feel about certain things, even after many years have passed This made me wish Galgut had recreated somethingtangible, instead of seemingly following the infatuation with the unknown from Forster s famous novel

  10. Hugh Hugh says:

    A fascinating portrait of E.M Forster and his long struggle to produce A passage to India Galgut s prose is always well judged and readable, and it left me wanting to read Forster.

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