The Maker of Universes PDF º The Maker PDF or

The Maker of Universes PDF º The Maker PDF or

The Maker of Universes [Reading] ➼ The Maker of Universes ➲ Philip José Farmer – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk When Robert Wolff found a strange horn in an empty house, he held the key to a different universe To blow that horn would open up a door through space time and permit entry to a cosmos whose dimension When Robert Wolff found a strange horn in an empty house, he held the key to a different universe To blow that horn would open up a The Maker PDF or door through space time and permit entry to a cosmos whose dimensions and laws were not those our starry galxy knowsFor that other universe was a place of tiers, world upon world piled upon each other like the landings of a sky piercing mountain The one to blow that horn would ascend those steps, from creation to creation, until he would come face to face with the being whose brain child it wasBut what if that maker of universes was a madman Or an imposter Or a super criminal hiding from the wrath of his own superiors The Maker of Universes is unlike any science fiction novel you have ever read, it is wonderfully unique.


10 thoughts on “The Maker of Universes

  1. Evgeny Evgeny says:

    A retired professor Robert Wolff was looking at the house he wanted to buy Suddenly in the closet a portal to another world appeared with a guy on the other side blowing a horn The portal was quickly closing, but not before the mysterious stranger threw Wolff the horn To make a long story short it was possible to open the portal again at the same place closet using that musical instrument Wolff did and found a paradise, so did not think twice about leaving behind his boring retired life an A retired professor Robert Wolff was looking at the house he wanted to buy Suddenly in the closet a portal to another world appeared with a guy on the other side blowing a horn The portal was quickly closing, but not before the mysterious stranger threw Wolff the horn To make a long story short it was possible to open the portal again at the same place closet using that musical instrument Wolff did and found a paradise, so did not think twice about leaving behind his boring retired life and nagging wife and to the new world he went After a while he realized the paradise is not exactly what it is cracked up to be, but at that time he was so deeply involved into the machinations of the new world he had no choice but to take action Let me just say that what followed was typical pulp fiction I mean it in good sense which strongly reminded me of Princess of Mars This series is notable for two reasons Firstly the world building is great and very fresh, even these days There is no way I am spoiling this, but there are two hints in the book and series names about it Secondly the series inspired Roger Zelazny s Amber which I consider one of the best fantasy series ever written even though I admit it aged a little You can actually see Zelazny s recommendation on the cover of this book I already mentioned pulp fiction As a typical example this book shares both its strength and weaknesses Great non stop action, constant mortal danger, testosterone overload, secondary characters dying by truckloads while the main characters are protected by the strongest possible plot armor these are all here I rated the book with 3 stars, but these are strong 3 stars on the side closer to 4 than 2 I definitely continue reading the series, but its first installment is not strong enough to warrant 4 I also have to mention that this is a must read for any die hard Amber fan


  2. Mark Mark says:

    As an exercise in world building, World of Tiers is very interesting That s about it, though I enjoyed it on a pulpy quick read level However, I wouldn t recommend it to anyone looking for a deep involving novel The Plot Robert Wolff is a retired linguistics professor looking at homes to buy in Arizona While inspecting a room alone, a gate to the world of tiers opens before him He steps through and finds a world where mermaids and nymphs exist After a few weeks of eating the food and dr As an exercise in world building, World of Tiers is very interesting That s about it, though I enjoyed it on a pulpy quick read level However, I wouldn t recommend it to anyone looking for a deep involving novel The Plot Robert Wolff is a retired linguistics professor looking at homes to buy in Arizona While inspecting a room alone, a gate to the world of tiers opens before him He steps through and finds a world where mermaids and nymphs exist After a few weeks of eating the food and drinking the water, he is young again That s when the plot really gets going and he tries to figure out what this world is The Good The world of tiers is a pretty cool invention It s a world shaped like a stepped Myan Incan pyramid, four steps high The individual layers are separated from each other, connected only in the middle by massive monoliths Each layer is massive, containing entire continents.The world exists in a pocket universe, created by an alien race of immense power It is orbited by one sun and one moon When the sun goes behind the monoliths in the middle of the world, that s when night occurs.People get from level to level by climbing the nooks and crannies of the massive monoliths in the middle of each level This is forbidden by the god of the world of tiers, though.Most of the inhabitants were kidnapped from earth and their physical bodies altered by the god to resemble creatures of earth s myths, such as centaurs and mermaids.All of this is really cool, and very inventive, in my opinion I liked this world building aspect of the novel the most The Not So Good The not so good Pretty much everything else The book read like a summary of another, longer book For instance, while climbing the central monoliths, one of the character s girlfriends becomes pregnant and later loses the baby I didn t really spoil anything here, because this happens in the space of a couple of pages No psychological ramifications and no blaming or hurt feelings occur The characters were also not very compelling There was one who was kind of a trickster, but it was obviously a mary sue self insertion character for the author himself He was a little too perfect and competent to be true Conclusion It s a good enough read but I wouldn t recommend it to anyone who isn t a big fan of world building On that alone, it deserves praise That s about all the praise it deserves, though


  3. Jim Jim says:

    I m re reading this now after finally completing the series It s been almost 40 years since I first read it, so I ll see if it keeps its 4 star rating I doubt it , but I HAVE to find out how the entire story winds up.The re read was great There are some holes in the story, but it still stands as a fun, quick read It s still a fairly unique adventure story that is based on SF, but has some fantasy elements, sort of For years, I considered it a good, stand alone, novel I still thi I m re reading this now after finally completing the series It s been almost 40 years since I first read it, so I ll see if it keeps its 4 star rating I doubt it , but I HAVE to find out how the entire story winds up.The re read was great There are some holes in the story, but it still stands as a fun, quick read It s still a fairly unique adventure story that is based on SF, but has some fantasy elements, sort of For years, I considered it a good, stand alone, novel I still think so However, I got sucked into reading the following books, through the 5th wanted to scream in frustration since the ending was a cliff hanger It is now a series of 7 books The series was completed in the 90 s, a 14 year gap between books 5 6 I haven t read 6 or 7, yet Reviews for the last book are not encouraging, but I will get them because I need closure The first book starts out with Wolf on Earth He falls in with a knave who leads him on a merry chase through a private world of tiers that is inhabited by a bizarre collection of mythological beings that were grown in the labs of the creator of the universe When I first read this, what impressed me most, was the new to me, then idea of private universes worlds that Farmer came up with how he handled them It s really just a fun, action story with an SF basis but reallyof a fantasy novel He s managed to pack so many different genres into one book tied them all together in a unique then seamless way Spoiler below Farmer posits a race that humans are descended from our Earth is just oneprivate universe Space travel isn t really possible since the stars aren t really there, they re imperfections in the lining of the bubble universe we inhabit The makers of the universes aren t even the originators of this, they found out the same thing as they developed They are now an old, declining race They ve forgotten the science behind the wonders they control are fighting among themselves the implication being they are repeating the cycle of those that created them The main character of the series is Kickaha, the merry knave that first introduces Wolf to the new universe He s originally from Earth is now something of a legend thorn in the side of the Lords His battle with one lord, Red Orc, in particular is a central theme the clean cut hero against the decadent villan


  4. William Clemens William Clemens says:

    I thought I liked Philip Jose Farmer, I really did, but maybe I am wrong.I remember being blown away by this series when I first read it many years back, but revisiting it I can t believe how awful some of this is The writing isn t terrible per se, and the plot is decent Earthling is transported to another world, cruel overlord has taken over, must climb through the universe to find the creator and take him down The twist at the end is not a huge surprise, and despite the fantastic creatures I thought I liked Philip Jose Farmer, I really did, but maybe I am wrong.I remember being blown away by this series when I first read it many years back, but revisiting it I can t believe how awful some of this is The writing isn t terrible per se, and the plot is decent Earthling is transported to another world, cruel overlord has taken over, must climb through the universe to find the creator and take him down The twist at the end is not a huge surprise, and despite the fantastic creatures along the way, the book drags Actually, it is mainly because of the creatures and landscapes along the way that the plot drags Rather than learning about the land and animals and people through plot, we get a lot of expoistion A lot of which is unclear why we needed it Farmer seems to have gotten so excited about the world he created, and the backstor he formulated, that we need to hear all about it, even when the plot just freezes while he tells us If that weren t bad enough, the name of each new and or person needs to have about 8 letters too many, 3 of which must be z s.I am going to push on to the next two or three to see if it gets better, but I am afraid it won t


  5. Steven Steven says:

    I loved how the book started with a whisper, in a very mundane setting Also I really loved the orientation sequence to the fantasy world There was some other good stuff throughout I have still have a lot of trouble grasping and keeping track of weird fantasy names though, like in the Hobbit At some point in this book, I found myself reading about centaurs, and I couldn t remember them being introduced A little later it was bird knights or something and I couldn t remember when they had been I loved how the book started with a whisper, in a very mundane setting Also I really loved the orientation sequence to the fantasy world There was some other good stuff throughout I have still have a lot of trouble grasping and keeping track of weird fantasy names though, like in the Hobbit At some point in this book, I found myself reading about centaurs, and I couldn t remember them being introduced A little later it was bird knights or something and I couldn t remember when they had been introduced either It s like a fantasy trope tossed salad Usually Farmer is great at evoking visuals, but I couldn t really picture the shape and scale of this Tier world very well This is my least favorite Philip Jose Farmer book so far The book didn t end well either, it just chopped off abruptly at the end to be picked up in the next book


  6. Betty Betty says:

    Solid read, typical Farmer book It was released in 1970, 1970 In spite of the age, it carries well for mainstream SF, although there are images and styles here that are very reminiscent of his Riverworld books That is the use of ancient history and mythology to drive his current worlds Decent read nonetheless I enjoyed it But it will not be a favourite.


  7. Metaphorosis Metaphorosis says:

    Metaphorosis Reviews2 starsSummary A dissatisfied retired man finds a strange gateway in the basement of a house that s for sale Going through it, he finds a bizarre world of stacked disks on a spindle, full of danger, weird environments, and beautiful women.Review Pretty much my entire, limited knowledge of Philip Jose Farmer comes from the Riverworld series I thought those books were mostly very good But it turns out that the bits I didn t like the macho tone, the occasional lack of logic Metaphorosis Reviews2 starsSummary A dissatisfied retired man finds a strange gateway in the basement of a house that s for sale Going through it, he finds a bizarre world of stacked disks on a spindle, full of danger, weird environments, and beautiful women.Review Pretty much my entire, limited knowledge of Philip Jose Farmer comes from the Riverworld series I thought those books were mostly very good But it turns out that the bits I didn t like the macho tone, the occasional lack of logic are very much a part of the Farmer approach In this book, they re the main part.It appears Farmer had a modestly intriguing idea the stacked world of tiers, and ran with it This is pulp fiction, but not in a good way It s all manly men, beautiful, obedient women, and a very thin plot tied together with an almost complete lack of logic In the hands of someone like Zelazny or Anthony, this could have worked For Farmer, it feels like a seat of the pants project written to deadline I just can t recommend it.I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review


  8. Traci Traci says:

    I have read so many books from this era with this similiar plot I m sure you know it well too The Narnia Wizard of Oz Alice in Wonderland theme of a modern day character unsatisfied with life being transported to a magical world I may have read it before but this is one of the better ones Nice writing and world building Doesn t really stand up to current fantasy or science fiction but an above average example of the golden age of pulp Recommended to both fans of fantasy and science fiction I have read so many books from this era with this similiar plot I m sure you know it well too The Narnia Wizard of Oz Alice in Wonderland theme of a modern day character unsatisfied with life being transported to a magical world I may have read it before but this is one of the better ones Nice writing and world building Doesn t really stand up to current fantasy or science fiction but an above average example of the golden age of pulp Recommended to both fans of fantasy and science fiction To anyone interested in this era of writing And to fans of Guy Gavriel Kay s Fionavar series as well as the books named above


  9. Lumys Lumys says:

    After reading To Your Scattered Bodies Go and it s sequels, which I loved, I was eager to try another book especially a serie by Farmer Even though not all the books in that cycle were perfect, sometimes fairly unequal, they were still pretty enjoyable, asking thought provoking moral, ethical and philosophical questions or building an interesting universe In the foreword of this book, Farmer explained how he came up with the different concepts as a young boy, how Kickaha and other charact After reading To Your Scattered Bodies Go and it s sequels, which I loved, I was eager to try another book especially a serie by Farmer Even though not all the books in that cycle were perfect, sometimes fairly unequal, they were still pretty enjoyable, asking thought provoking moral, ethical and philosophical questions or building an interesting universe In the foreword of this book, Farmer explained how he came up with the different concepts as a young boy, how Kickaha and other characters were created, what inspired them and when I realized I was getting another stranger stuck on a weird planet , it only added to the hype Oh boy was I in for a disappointment.To sum up the book without spoiling too much, we follow Robert Wolff, an old American professor stuck in a fairly unhappy marriage, who discovers a silver horn allowing him to travel to another universe through a scene that is _slightly_ reminiscent of a book by a certain C S Lewis After discovering the area for a few days and getting to know the locals, he decides to stay there permanently after realizing his body is becoming younger his hair regrows, even his erm manhood is better Once he learns the local language some ancient Greek variant, lucky he was classical languages professor right , we get to know the universe a bit better, which is basically shaped like the Tower of Babel, or a wedding cake, multiple cylinders of decreasing sizes stacked on one another, each containing a different biome, culture, etc After his silver horn and the most beautiful woman of the universe are stolen from him yes, she seems to be his property too , he follows the kidnappers to rescue both, going through different adventures on each level, with the added goal of reaching the top to meet the Lord who rules that universe and making him pay for his wicked games like implementing people s brains in apes or eagles.Now, Farmer seems to really know his anthropology, I am no expert but the names sound natural, the historical, religious and mythical references are flowing and at no point do we really see or feel the seam, everything seems to hold together Moreover, he coversthan the Western classics, granted two levels are around ancient Greeks Atlantis and Troy but the other are built around Native American culture and an interesting mix of 13th Century Teutonic Germans and Yiddish speaking Germans with also ancient Semitic aborigines All of this make the universe feels fairly rich, but unfortunately, the pacing makes us miss most of it.As the story is centered around the rescue of Wolff s belongings, we really don t get to stop much to take on the sights, on every level, the speed is greater, we barely get to see the Atlantis level, the Native American one is literally spent rushing on horseback, etc The book will jump between a few scenes and dialogues to a paragraph describing weeks if not months worth of actions in a few words Sure, I don t want to read 200 pages of Robert climbs 4 cliffs of 30000 feet but still, sometimes it feels rushed At the start of the book, I would empathize easily with Wolff but as the book progresses characters feel emptier and emptier, becomingarchetypical, less relatableThe book fitsthe bill of fantasy than sci fi, which wasn t a problem for me in this case, but some elements would really make the suspension of disbelief difficult to maintain, e.g the fact that Wolff always manage to follow the kidnappers even though that world is huge and he gets lost or delayed a bunch of times Kickaha is basically a Mary Sue, able to survive anything, seemingly teleport around maybe even literally, later books seem to focus on him so it might be explained then Despite a nice reveal twist at the end, the story is pretty straightforward apart from the few extreme coincidences.However, my biggest grip with the book is the way it treats non white male characters Now, the book was published in 1965 and I am sure none was shocked by any of that when it came out, but today, in 2020, it does clash withmodern sensibilities While the usage of Amerindian could be excused for the time, negroid is another thing entirely, a few years before the Civil Rights movement and we are still stuck on this There is also a few of the Semitic characters who are described to have hawkish noses, which is a bit yikes Moving on from the racist undertones, there are also misoginist ones Wolff talks about his woman fast and how he wants to break it, Kickaha threatens a woman with rape and tell her she will long for him afterwards And then there is the if you don t slay chicks you are queer and other masculine remarks Obviously this isn t as bad as, say, Lovecraft but does it mean it s ok I am partial to the Death of the Author and removing some of the writer bias and adding historical context but it sometimes read really archaic and that s a shame.For a while, I compared this book to Everworld from K A Applegate, but truthfully these books are waybalanced and polished I thought I was getting another Riverworld saga, but I was actually reading an ancestor of that, a first draft of To Your Scattered Bodies Go In conclusion, while I enjoyed part of the book, I am not sure I will be reading the sequels anytime soon, despite the really interesting ending we want answers Some parts of the book, just don t play well with modern sensibilities, a lot of it feels rushed or hollow, the characters get no development or too much and from nowhere , etc


  10. Jack Jack says:

    Been awhile but I remember searching all over to find remember this series, I could only remember kickaha or something like that to go on my search on finding these again this was before the computer era of everything at your fingertip s Fun read kind of like the Amber series but different heh 4 6 in series and everyone just pulls you along, and end s up in our world if I remember right best be on the re read shelf


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10 thoughts on “The Maker of Universes

  1. Evgeny Evgeny says:

    A retired professor Robert Wolff was looking at the house he wanted to buy Suddenly in the closet a portal to another world appeared with a guy on the other side blowing a horn The portal was quickly closing, but not before the mysterious stranger threw Wolff the horn To make a long story short it was possible to open the portal again at the same place closet using that musical instrument Wolff did and found a paradise, so did not think twice about leaving behind his boring retired life an A retired professor Robert Wolff was looking at the house he wanted to buy Suddenly in the closet a portal to another world appeared with a guy on the other side blowing a horn The portal was quickly closing, but not before the mysterious stranger threw Wolff the horn To make a long story short it was possible to open the portal again at the same place closet using that musical instrument Wolff did and found a paradise, so did not think twice about leaving behind his boring retired life and nagging wife and to the new world he went After a while he realized the paradise is not exactly what it is cracked up to be, but at that time he was so deeply involved into the machinations of the new world he had no choice but to take action Let me just say that what followed was typical pulp fiction I mean it in good sense which strongly reminded me of Princess of Mars This series is notable for two reasons Firstly the world building is great and very fresh, even these days There is no way I am spoiling this, but there are two hints in the book and series names about it Secondly the series inspired Roger Zelazny s Amber which I consider one of the best fantasy series ever written even though I admit it aged a little You can actually see Zelazny s recommendation on the cover of this book I already mentioned pulp fiction As a typical example this book shares both its strength and weaknesses Great non stop action, constant mortal danger, testosterone overload, secondary characters dying by truckloads while the main characters are protected by the strongest possible plot armor these are all here I rated the book with 3 stars, but these are strong 3 stars on the side closer to 4 than 2 I definitely continue reading the series, but its first installment is not strong enough to warrant 4 I also have to mention that this is a must read for any die hard Amber fan

  2. Mark Mark says:

    As an exercise in world building, World of Tiers is very interesting That s about it, though I enjoyed it on a pulpy quick read level However, I wouldn t recommend it to anyone looking for a deep involving novel The Plot Robert Wolff is a retired linguistics professor looking at homes to buy in Arizona While inspecting a room alone, a gate to the world of tiers opens before him He steps through and finds a world where mermaids and nymphs exist After a few weeks of eating the food and dr As an exercise in world building, World of Tiers is very interesting That s about it, though I enjoyed it on a pulpy quick read level However, I wouldn t recommend it to anyone looking for a deep involving novel The Plot Robert Wolff is a retired linguistics professor looking at homes to buy in Arizona While inspecting a room alone, a gate to the world of tiers opens before him He steps through and finds a world where mermaids and nymphs exist After a few weeks of eating the food and drinking the water, he is young again That s when the plot really gets going and he tries to figure out what this world is The Good The world of tiers is a pretty cool invention It s a world shaped like a stepped Myan Incan pyramid, four steps high The individual layers are separated from each other, connected only in the middle by massive monoliths Each layer is massive, containing entire continents.The world exists in a pocket universe, created by an alien race of immense power It is orbited by one sun and one moon When the sun goes behind the monoliths in the middle of the world, that s when night occurs.People get from level to level by climbing the nooks and crannies of the massive monoliths in the middle of each level This is forbidden by the god of the world of tiers, though.Most of the inhabitants were kidnapped from earth and their physical bodies altered by the god to resemble creatures of earth s myths, such as centaurs and mermaids.All of this is really cool, and very inventive, in my opinion I liked this world building aspect of the novel the most The Not So Good The not so good Pretty much everything else The book read like a summary of another, longer book For instance, while climbing the central monoliths, one of the character s girlfriends becomes pregnant and later loses the baby I didn t really spoil anything here, because this happens in the space of a couple of pages No psychological ramifications and no blaming or hurt feelings occur The characters were also not very compelling There was one who was kind of a trickster, but it was obviously a mary sue self insertion character for the author himself He was a little too perfect and competent to be true Conclusion It s a good enough read but I wouldn t recommend it to anyone who isn t a big fan of world building On that alone, it deserves praise That s about all the praise it deserves, though

  3. Jim Jim says:

    I m re reading this now after finally completing the series It s been almost 40 years since I first read it, so I ll see if it keeps its 4 star rating I doubt it , but I HAVE to find out how the entire story winds up.The re read was great There are some holes in the story, but it still stands as a fun, quick read It s still a fairly unique adventure story that is based on SF, but has some fantasy elements, sort of For years, I considered it a good, stand alone, novel I still thi I m re reading this now after finally completing the series It s been almost 40 years since I first read it, so I ll see if it keeps its 4 star rating I doubt it , but I HAVE to find out how the entire story winds up.The re read was great There are some holes in the story, but it still stands as a fun, quick read It s still a fairly unique adventure story that is based on SF, but has some fantasy elements, sort of For years, I considered it a good, stand alone, novel I still think so However, I got sucked into reading the following books, through the 5th wanted to scream in frustration since the ending was a cliff hanger It is now a series of 7 books The series was completed in the 90 s, a 14 year gap between books 5 6 I haven t read 6 or 7, yet Reviews for the last book are not encouraging, but I will get them because I need closure The first book starts out with Wolf on Earth He falls in with a knave who leads him on a merry chase through a private world of tiers that is inhabited by a bizarre collection of mythological beings that were grown in the labs of the creator of the universe When I first read this, what impressed me most, was the new to me, then idea of private universes worlds that Farmer came up with how he handled them It s really just a fun, action story with an SF basis but reallyof a fantasy novel He s managed to pack so many different genres into one book tied them all together in a unique then seamless way Spoiler below Farmer posits a race that humans are descended from our Earth is just oneprivate universe Space travel isn t really possible since the stars aren t really there, they re imperfections in the lining of the bubble universe we inhabit The makers of the universes aren t even the originators of this, they found out the same thing as they developed They are now an old, declining race They ve forgotten the science behind the wonders they control are fighting among themselves the implication being they are repeating the cycle of those that created them The main character of the series is Kickaha, the merry knave that first introduces Wolf to the new universe He s originally from Earth is now something of a legend thorn in the side of the Lords His battle with one lord, Red Orc, in particular is a central theme the clean cut hero against the decadent villan

  4. William Clemens William Clemens says:

    I thought I liked Philip Jose Farmer, I really did, but maybe I am wrong.I remember being blown away by this series when I first read it many years back, but revisiting it I can t believe how awful some of this is The writing isn t terrible per se, and the plot is decent Earthling is transported to another world, cruel overlord has taken over, must climb through the universe to find the creator and take him down The twist at the end is not a huge surprise, and despite the fantastic creatures I thought I liked Philip Jose Farmer, I really did, but maybe I am wrong.I remember being blown away by this series when I first read it many years back, but revisiting it I can t believe how awful some of this is The writing isn t terrible per se, and the plot is decent Earthling is transported to another world, cruel overlord has taken over, must climb through the universe to find the creator and take him down The twist at the end is not a huge surprise, and despite the fantastic creatures along the way, the book drags Actually, it is mainly because of the creatures and landscapes along the way that the plot drags Rather than learning about the land and animals and people through plot, we get a lot of expoistion A lot of which is unclear why we needed it Farmer seems to have gotten so excited about the world he created, and the backstor he formulated, that we need to hear all about it, even when the plot just freezes while he tells us If that weren t bad enough, the name of each new and or person needs to have about 8 letters too many, 3 of which must be z s.I am going to push on to the next two or three to see if it gets better, but I am afraid it won t

  5. Steven Steven says:

    I loved how the book started with a whisper, in a very mundane setting Also I really loved the orientation sequence to the fantasy world There was some other good stuff throughout I have still have a lot of trouble grasping and keeping track of weird fantasy names though, like in the Hobbit At some point in this book, I found myself reading about centaurs, and I couldn t remember them being introduced A little later it was bird knights or something and I couldn t remember when they had been I loved how the book started with a whisper, in a very mundane setting Also I really loved the orientation sequence to the fantasy world There was some other good stuff throughout I have still have a lot of trouble grasping and keeping track of weird fantasy names though, like in the Hobbit At some point in this book, I found myself reading about centaurs, and I couldn t remember them being introduced A little later it was bird knights or something and I couldn t remember when they had been introduced either It s like a fantasy trope tossed salad Usually Farmer is great at evoking visuals, but I couldn t really picture the shape and scale of this Tier world very well This is my least favorite Philip Jose Farmer book so far The book didn t end well either, it just chopped off abruptly at the end to be picked up in the next book

  6. Betty Betty says:

    Solid read, typical Farmer book It was released in 1970, 1970 In spite of the age, it carries well for mainstream SF, although there are images and styles here that are very reminiscent of his Riverworld books That is the use of ancient history and mythology to drive his current worlds Decent read nonetheless I enjoyed it But it will not be a favourite.

  7. Metaphorosis Metaphorosis says:

    Metaphorosis Reviews2 starsSummary A dissatisfied retired man finds a strange gateway in the basement of a house that s for sale Going through it, he finds a bizarre world of stacked disks on a spindle, full of danger, weird environments, and beautiful women.Review Pretty much my entire, limited knowledge of Philip Jose Farmer comes from the Riverworld series I thought those books were mostly very good But it turns out that the bits I didn t like the macho tone, the occasional lack of logic Metaphorosis Reviews2 starsSummary A dissatisfied retired man finds a strange gateway in the basement of a house that s for sale Going through it, he finds a bizarre world of stacked disks on a spindle, full of danger, weird environments, and beautiful women.Review Pretty much my entire, limited knowledge of Philip Jose Farmer comes from the Riverworld series I thought those books were mostly very good But it turns out that the bits I didn t like the macho tone, the occasional lack of logic are very much a part of the Farmer approach In this book, they re the main part.It appears Farmer had a modestly intriguing idea the stacked world of tiers, and ran with it This is pulp fiction, but not in a good way It s all manly men, beautiful, obedient women, and a very thin plot tied together with an almost complete lack of logic In the hands of someone like Zelazny or Anthony, this could have worked For Farmer, it feels like a seat of the pants project written to deadline I just can t recommend it.I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review

  8. Traci Traci says:

    I have read so many books from this era with this similiar plot I m sure you know it well too The Narnia Wizard of Oz Alice in Wonderland theme of a modern day character unsatisfied with life being transported to a magical world I may have read it before but this is one of the better ones Nice writing and world building Doesn t really stand up to current fantasy or science fiction but an above average example of the golden age of pulp Recommended to both fans of fantasy and science fiction I have read so many books from this era with this similiar plot I m sure you know it well too The Narnia Wizard of Oz Alice in Wonderland theme of a modern day character unsatisfied with life being transported to a magical world I may have read it before but this is one of the better ones Nice writing and world building Doesn t really stand up to current fantasy or science fiction but an above average example of the golden age of pulp Recommended to both fans of fantasy and science fiction To anyone interested in this era of writing And to fans of Guy Gavriel Kay s Fionavar series as well as the books named above

  9. Lumys Lumys says:

    After reading To Your Scattered Bodies Go and it s sequels, which I loved, I was eager to try another book especially a serie by Farmer Even though not all the books in that cycle were perfect, sometimes fairly unequal, they were still pretty enjoyable, asking thought provoking moral, ethical and philosophical questions or building an interesting universe In the foreword of this book, Farmer explained how he came up with the different concepts as a young boy, how Kickaha and other charact After reading To Your Scattered Bodies Go and it s sequels, which I loved, I was eager to try another book especially a serie by Farmer Even though not all the books in that cycle were perfect, sometimes fairly unequal, they were still pretty enjoyable, asking thought provoking moral, ethical and philosophical questions or building an interesting universe In the foreword of this book, Farmer explained how he came up with the different concepts as a young boy, how Kickaha and other characters were created, what inspired them and when I realized I was getting another stranger stuck on a weird planet , it only added to the hype Oh boy was I in for a disappointment.To sum up the book without spoiling too much, we follow Robert Wolff, an old American professor stuck in a fairly unhappy marriage, who discovers a silver horn allowing him to travel to another universe through a scene that is _slightly_ reminiscent of a book by a certain C S Lewis After discovering the area for a few days and getting to know the locals, he decides to stay there permanently after realizing his body is becoming younger his hair regrows, even his erm manhood is better Once he learns the local language some ancient Greek variant, lucky he was classical languages professor right , we get to know the universe a bit better, which is basically shaped like the Tower of Babel, or a wedding cake, multiple cylinders of decreasing sizes stacked on one another, each containing a different biome, culture, etc After his silver horn and the most beautiful woman of the universe are stolen from him yes, she seems to be his property too , he follows the kidnappers to rescue both, going through different adventures on each level, with the added goal of reaching the top to meet the Lord who rules that universe and making him pay for his wicked games like implementing people s brains in apes or eagles.Now, Farmer seems to really know his anthropology, I am no expert but the names sound natural, the historical, religious and mythical references are flowing and at no point do we really see or feel the seam, everything seems to hold together Moreover, he coversthan the Western classics, granted two levels are around ancient Greeks Atlantis and Troy but the other are built around Native American culture and an interesting mix of 13th Century Teutonic Germans and Yiddish speaking Germans with also ancient Semitic aborigines All of this make the universe feels fairly rich, but unfortunately, the pacing makes us miss most of it.As the story is centered around the rescue of Wolff s belongings, we really don t get to stop much to take on the sights, on every level, the speed is greater, we barely get to see the Atlantis level, the Native American one is literally spent rushing on horseback, etc The book will jump between a few scenes and dialogues to a paragraph describing weeks if not months worth of actions in a few words Sure, I don t want to read 200 pages of Robert climbs 4 cliffs of 30000 feet but still, sometimes it feels rushed At the start of the book, I would empathize easily with Wolff but as the book progresses characters feel emptier and emptier, becomingarchetypical, less relatableThe book fitsthe bill of fantasy than sci fi, which wasn t a problem for me in this case, but some elements would really make the suspension of disbelief difficult to maintain, e.g the fact that Wolff always manage to follow the kidnappers even though that world is huge and he gets lost or delayed a bunch of times Kickaha is basically a Mary Sue, able to survive anything, seemingly teleport around maybe even literally, later books seem to focus on him so it might be explained then Despite a nice reveal twist at the end, the story is pretty straightforward apart from the few extreme coincidences.However, my biggest grip with the book is the way it treats non white male characters Now, the book was published in 1965 and I am sure none was shocked by any of that when it came out, but today, in 2020, it does clash withmodern sensibilities While the usage of Amerindian could be excused for the time, negroid is another thing entirely, a few years before the Civil Rights movement and we are still stuck on this There is also a few of the Semitic characters who are described to have hawkish noses, which is a bit yikes Moving on from the racist undertones, there are also misoginist ones Wolff talks about his woman fast and how he wants to break it, Kickaha threatens a woman with rape and tell her she will long for him afterwards And then there is the if you don t slay chicks you are queer and other masculine remarks Obviously this isn t as bad as, say, Lovecraft but does it mean it s ok I am partial to the Death of the Author and removing some of the writer bias and adding historical context but it sometimes read really archaic and that s a shame.For a while, I compared this book to Everworld from K A Applegate, but truthfully these books are waybalanced and polished I thought I was getting another Riverworld saga, but I was actually reading an ancestor of that, a first draft of To Your Scattered Bodies Go In conclusion, while I enjoyed part of the book, I am not sure I will be reading the sequels anytime soon, despite the really interesting ending we want answers Some parts of the book, just don t play well with modern sensibilities, a lot of it feels rushed or hollow, the characters get no development or too much and from nowhere , etc

  10. Jack Jack says:

    Been awhile but I remember searching all over to find remember this series, I could only remember kickaha or something like that to go on my search on finding these again this was before the computer era of everything at your fingertip s Fun read kind of like the Amber series but different heh 4 6 in series and everyone just pulls you along, and end s up in our world if I remember right best be on the re read shelf

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