Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends PDF ¸ Ancient

Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends PDF ¸ Ancient


  • Paperback
  • 320 pages
  • Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends (Library of Essential Reading)
  • Lewis Spence
  • English
  • 08 February 2017
  • 0760770395

10 thoughts on “Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends (Library of Essential Reading)

  1. Victoria Ray Victoria Ray says:

    It is a very special book for those who enjoy reading a bitold fashioned language interested in Egyptian Mythologybut can confuse those who doesn t know much about ancient Egypt, Gods, Animal Worship, dark sides of Religion I used it mostly for research and inspiration ideas for my writing I believe it contains excellent information about the Egypt past we don t know It is a very special book for those who enjoy reading a bitold fashioned language interested in Egyptian Mythologybut can confuse those who doesn t know much about ancient Egypt, Gods, Animal Worship, dark sides of Religion I used it mostly for research and inspiration ideas for my writing I believe it contains excellent information about the Egypt past we don t know


  2. Paul Haspel Paul Haspel says:

    Ancient Egypt s mythology is intricate and multi layered and for that reason, it can be a challenge for the modern reader to understand how the gods and goddesses of the Egyptian pantheon, and their stories, interrelate Lewis Spence s Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends can provide a helpful introduction to classical Egyptian mythology, though the alert reader should approach this book with a sense of its limitations.Author Lewis Spence 1874 1955 , a Scottish journalist and poet, was also a de Ancient Egypt s mythology is intricate and multi layered and for that reason, it can be a challenge for the modern reader to understand how the gods and goddesses of the Egyptian pantheon, and their stories, interrelate Lewis Spence s Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends can provide a helpful introduction to classical Egyptian mythology, though the alert reader should approach this book with a sense of its limitations.Author Lewis Spence 1874 1955 , a Scottish journalist and poet, was also a dedicated student of mythology, with a strong interest in the occult He published Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends in 1915 or, in other words, seven years before archaeologist Howard Carter turned the world of Egyptology upside down with his discovery of the tomb of the pharaoh Tutankhamun in 1922 Accordingly, some readers may find some of Spence s premises and conclusions incomplete and that s even before we consider the disheartening ease with which Spence uses terms like barbarian and savage to talk about civilizations that are different from his own.Spence approaches Egyptian myth in terms of the then relatively new field of comparative world mythology His debt to fellow Scot Sir James George Frazer s great pioneering work in that field, The Golden Bough 1880 , is evident at one point, Spence praises the manner in which Frazer pertinently examines various interpretations of the significance of the myth of Osiris By contrast, he seems hostile to the ideas of E.A Wallis Budge, the leading Egyptologist of his time, spending several pages of the book s first chapter seeking to refute Wallis Budge s claim that there is no fetishistic or totemic aspect to the Egyptian deities.Anyone who has toured sites of Egyptian antiquity, such as the Philae temple complex in Upper Egypt, knows that the myth of Isis and Osiris is among the most important in the entire Egyptian pantheon Briefly, the story is as follows Osiris was murdered and dismembered by his brother Set, god of evil Isis, wife of Osiris, recovered the scattered parts of Osiris body and resurrected her husband long enough that the two could have a child, the hawk headed god Horus Horus fought with and defeated Set and Osiris proceeded to the underworld, where he resides to this day as judge of the dead Spence comments thoughtfully on the significance of this myth, writing that We find the myths of the combat between Set and Horus evolving from a simple opposition of day and night into a combat between the two gods.The combat symbolized the moral idea of the victory of good over evil, and those of the dead who were justified were regarded as having overcome Set as Horus had done p 100.Spence also does well at setting forth the history of religious practice in pharaonic Egypt, providing examples of change and continuity in terms of how the Egyptians practiced their faith, as when he talks of social and religious changes that occurred at the beginning of what Egyptologists call the Late Period, around 700 B.C Toward the end of the eighth century B.C a great religious reaction set in Hitherto the brilliant opening of the New Empire, particularly the time of Rameses II, had set a model for the pious of the Late period now the Old Kingdom, its monuments, rites, and customs, its fervent piety and its proud conservatism, was become the model epoch for the entire nation It was, however, less a faithful copy than a caricature of the Old Kingdom.All that was most strange and outrin the ancient religion was sought out and emulated Old monuments and religious literature were studied the language and orthography of long past centuries were revived and adopted and if much of this was incomprehensible to the bulk of the people, its very mystery but made it thesacred. p 301 Yet not all of the Egyptian stories included in this volume were myths meant to elucidate sacred truths of the Egyptian religion from pharaonic times some were stories that were set down simply to entertain These stories of magic and royal intrigue, which might remind some readers of the tales from the 1001 Nights, include the story of The Prophecy of Dedi from the Westcar papyrus in the Berlin Museum Like a number of the stories from The Arabian Nights, The Prophecy of Dedi makes a point of combining magic oriented plot devices with some historical elements in order to enhance the story s verisimilitude it is described as taking place in the time of Khufu and his son Khafra or Cheops and his son Chephren , the 4th dynasty pharaohs who built the two largest of the Pyramids of Giza back around 2500 B.C.As the story has it, Dedi s reputed ability to restore life to the dead draws the attention of Khufu, who feels that such knowledge would perhaps be of use to him in the construction of his pyramid p 201 Dedi is summoned, and proves his magical abilities by bringing a decapitated duck back to life into the bargain, he reassures the pharaoh Khufu, who is worried about the long term prospects for his dynasty, by prophesying that thy son shall reign, and thy son s son p 202 something that any Egyptian of that time could verify, simply by paying a visit to the three pyramids of Khufu and Khafra and Menkaure The expository passages of Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends can be heavy going by contrast, when Spence lets go of his anxiety to demonstrate his scholarly bona fides, and simply tells the stories, the book is most successful Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends is helpfully illustrated with photographs of papyri, statuary, mummies human and animal , pyramids, and temples, as well as some paintings by book illustrator Evelyn Paul that capture the lush and romantic quality of the myths Some of Spence s ideas definitely need to be taken with the proverbial grain of salt later in his career, he became one of the first proponents of the idea that the Nazi regime in Germany had to have been generated by malevolent occult forces as if the human capacity for evil had not already been made clear on many occasions before the Nazis came to power, and has not been abundantly demonstrated many times since the Nazi regime s collapse Yet Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends still provides a rather helpful, if inevitably a rather dated, survey.And Spence s work still seems to enjoy a degree of respect among at least some contemporary Egyptians I encountered Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends at a gift shop in Luxor not the temple complex in Upper Egypt, but rather the Egyptian themed, pyramid shaped gambling casino complex in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.A The gift shop staff, in an apparent nod toward authenticity, were all Egyptian and when the lady at the checkout counter saw that I had skipped the plastic snow globe pyramids and the King Tut T shirts, and had instead selected the Dover Books edition of Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends, she nodded gravely, looked up at me, and said, You chose well


  3. Sam Sam says:

    This was the hardest book I ve ever tried to get through and I really wanted to get through it When I started reading it, I was thinking to myself throughout the introduction that the author just seemed like he was trying to sound smart, but many of his sentences were incomplete It took me many lunch breaks to get through the introduction alone I finally checked out the date and realized that it was written over one hundred years ago However, I ve read many excerpts from books and news artic This was the hardest book I ve ever tried to get through and I really wanted to get through it When I started reading it, I was thinking to myself throughout the introduction that the author just seemed like he was trying to sound smart, but many of his sentences were incomplete It took me many lunch breaks to get through the introduction alone I finally checked out the date and realized that it was written over one hundred years ago However, I ve read many excerpts from books and news articles from that time that weren t written as poorly as this book You would think that whoever edited it to publish in a newer version would at least make the sentences complete, but that wasn t the case Aside from that, the author seemed like he was blurting out his opinions, rather than actual facts Putting aside all of the crap I ve read on the internet, this is the first actual book on Egyptian myths that I ve read which is why I wanted to get through it so much , but I feel like I m going to have to read some other books to a figure out what the author was trying to convey, and b get actual facts, rather than opinions All in all, the book wasn t too terrible Once I got past the introduction, it was easier to get through However, I definitely would not read it again or recommend it to somebody who wants to read about Egyptian myths and legends which didn t seem to be a big part of the book, anyway I d definitely try to find another book for that I don t even think I could put this book in the Educational category If you do decide to read it, good luck


  4. Emma Lou Emma Lou says:

    You could tell that it was written in the last century off of it s writing style without even having to look at the publication date, but that was just fine with me Some people have a harder time reading things that are written in this way, or they think it s annoying, but I had no problems with it I picked it up research into the myths and stories of Egypt, and I got not only some stories that I had never heard before, but also a look into how these stories originated, how they effected Egypt You could tell that it was written in the last century off of it s writing style without even having to look at the publication date, but that was just fine with me Some people have a harder time reading things that are written in this way, or they think it s annoying, but I had no problems with it I picked it up research into the myths and stories of Egypt, and I got not only some stories that I had never heard before, but also a look into how these stories originated, how they effected Egyptian culture, and the history that could be taken from them All in all, good for the light research I was looking for


  5. Kadri Kadri says:

    Olen alati olnud huvitatud erinevate rahvaste ning kultuuride m tidest ja legendidest, seega asusin ka seda teost hinaga uurima Siiski ei suutnud ma kaugemale lugeda poolest sissejuhatusest Juba eess nas igustab Spence enda seisukohti, viidates, et ta on k llalt tark, et tunnustatud ekspertidele vastu vaielda Kiirest googeldamisest selgus, et tegu oli oti ajakirjaniku ja folkloristiga, kes ritas oma elu jooksul kirjutada v ga mitmel erineval teemal Juba sissejuhatuses tuleb esile leo Olen alati olnud huvitatud erinevate rahvaste ning kultuuride m tidest ja legendidest, seega asusin ka seda teost hinaga uurima Siiski ei suutnud ma kaugemale lugeda poolest sissejuhatusest Juba eess nas igustab Spence enda seisukohti, viidates, et ta on k llalt tark, et tunnustatud ekspertidele vastu vaielda Kiirest googeldamisest selgus, et tegu oli oti ajakirjaniku ja folkloristiga, kes ritas oma elu jooksul kirjutada v ga mitmel erineval teemal Juba sissejuhatuses tuleb esile leolev suhtumine, mis autoril uuritava kultuuri vastu on Tegemist on t pilise 20 sajandi alguse raamatuga, mis tegeleb madalama rahvuse kultuuri kirjeldamisega


  6. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    Although full of information, this was terribly dry and a struggle to get through at parts Originally published in 1915, it s very much a book for it s time, referring to people and civilizations as savages Since that year there has beendiscovery and research and I m sure there areup to date books about Egypt s myths and legends It s my own fault for not seeing this was published in 1915 so that s on me.


  7. Lizz Lizz says:

    I found this book and was glad to see that it was printed in 1985 but yikes Turns out it was originally published in 1915 Much of the information is outdated or comes solely from Spence s imagination Even worse is the white savior narrative it s muchobvious here than it is in Budge s writing.


  8. Joshua C. Joshua C. says:

    A lot of the history is inaccurate This is a very old book, so the understanding of Ancient Egyptian culture is pretty outdated It is still fairly in line with the circumstances during the late New Kingdom around the time when the empire was really starting to finally fall apart, but most of these claims do not apply to the preceding bulk and meat of the 3,000 year era of the Ancient Egyptian Civilization Additionally, Spence comes at his subject as a comparative mythologist, and that agenda A lot of the history is inaccurate This is a very old book, so the understanding of Ancient Egyptian culture is pretty outdated It is still fairly in line with the circumstances during the late New Kingdom around the time when the empire was really starting to finally fall apart, but most of these claims do not apply to the preceding bulk and meat of the 3,000 year era of the Ancient Egyptian Civilization Additionally, Spence comes at his subject as a comparative mythologist, and that agenda radically skews his interpretation of the Ancient Egyptian religious tradition so that he makes innumerable claims about the Ancient Egyptian pantheon, of its analogous symmetry to other ancient religions and of a dialectical influence working between the development of the Ancient Egyptian cosmology and that of those of its nearby contemporaries His theory for the AnimismFetishism TotemismPolytheism development of the early Ancient Egyptian religion comes as an unquestioned schema common to the comparative religion approach In this case it seems Spence allowed this presumption to blind him, because, though he elaborately asserts that this developmental structure applies to the Ancient Egyptians, there is actually very little evidence to suggest that it does in fact apply Actually the evidence tends to show a different development directly from animism into anthropomorphic psuedo henotheism I m also somewhat disappointed with his shamelessly scant treatment of the Cult of Aten, which deserved farattention than many of his other elaborations.All those things aside, this book does contain a very satisfying account of the major myth narratives unique to that civilization, and anyone seeking to know those stories will be able to find them here.Overall, the meat of the book is its content, and it s content is very good The fat of Spence s opinions which ornament the content, that fat is outdated and unsavory But for a reader who can cut past the fat to pull out the meat it garnishes will find a meal very worth eating, or a book well worth being read But maybe compliment this book with the wine of The Culture of Ancient Egypt by John A Wilson, who is much fairer in presenting the historical religious development without imposing anachronistic assumptions


  9. Mel Mel says:

    This book was a lovely collection of Egyptian myths and literature The translations were great Unfortunately whenever the author started talking about his own theories I really wanted to punch him in the face He s one of the early 20th century religious theorists who see religion as progressing from savage to monotheism with all the vaule judgements that entails So when discussing Ancient Egyptian religion he relates it back to the savages of North and Central America and tries to use This book was a lovely collection of Egyptian myths and literature The translations were great Unfortunately whenever the author started talking about his own theories I really wanted to punch him in the face He s one of the early 20th century religious theorists who see religion as progressing from savage to monotheism with all the vaule judgements that entails So when discussing Ancient Egyptian religion he relates it back to the savages of North and Central America and tries to use examples from their primative religion to explain early ideas about Egyptian religion and argues against what the Egyptologists say At times such comments come across as outwardly racist For example, Gods of African origin are figured as hideous, frightful, distorted, and enormously fat creatures, resembling the negro human fetish which may be found today among African tribes 280 281 He also states how the Egyptian mind is incapable of abstract thought 283 which I have to say seems to be taking this whole progress idea a little to far I m not sure if I can recommend this There s such a terrible underlying philosophy of religion to this book and it s almost impossible to just read the stories without getting the author s bias coming through If you can find another collection I d read that instead Or if you do read this, read the section on Egyptian literature as that s the nicest, some fantastic stories without too much of the author s bias coming through


  10. Paul Haspel Paul Haspel says:

    Lewis Spence s Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends was originally published in 1915, seven years before the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun Spence, a folklorist and student of the occult, approaches Egyptian myth in terms of the then relatively new study of world mythology his debt to James Frazer s The Golden Bough is evident, as is his tendency to quarrel with then renowned Egyptologist E.A Wallis Budge This is the same Wallis Budge of whom James Spader s renegade Egyptologist in the Lewis Spence s Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends was originally published in 1915, seven years before the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun Spence, a folklorist and student of the occult, approaches Egyptian myth in terms of the then relatively new study of world mythology his debt to James Frazer s The Golden Bough is evident, as is his tendency to quarrel with then renowned Egyptologist E.A Wallis Budge This is the same Wallis Budge of whom James Spader s renegade Egyptologist in the movie Stargate scornfully says, I can t believe they re still reprinting him Some expository sections of this book are relatively heavy going At other times, when Spence simply shares with us some of the myths and legends, the book soars Helpfully illustrated with photographs of papyri, statuary, mummies human and animal , pyramids, and temples, as well as some paintings by book illustrator Evelyn Paul that capture the lush and romantic quality of the myths The ease with which Spence uses words like barbarian and savage may grate on modern ears Still, it s a helpful if somewhat dated survey


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends (Library of Essential Reading)❮Reading❯ ➿ Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends (Library of Essential Reading) Author Lewis Spence – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk The myths and legends of ancient Egypt still reach out to us across nearly six thousand years with timeless and universal expressions of human hopes and fears that are sometimes quite familiar, someti Myths and ePUB ☆ The myths and legends of ancient Egypt still reach out to us across nearly six thousand years with timeless and universal expressions of human hopes and fears that are sometimes quite familiar, sometimes quite strange This book gives an introduction to the study of Egypt.


About the Author: Lewis Spence

Myths and ePUB ☆ James Lewis Thomas Chalmers Spence was a Scottish journalist, poet, author, folklorist and student of the occultAfter graduating from Edinburgh University he pursued a career in journalism He was an editor at The Scotsman , editor of The Edinburgh Magazine for a year, , then an Ancient Egyptian eBook Ç editor at The British Weekly, In this time his interest was sparked in the myth and folklore of Mexico and Central America, resulting in his popularisation of the Mayan Popul Vuh, the sacred book of the Quich Mayas He compiled A Dictionary of Mythology and Egyptian Myths and PDF/EPUB » numerous additional volumesSpence was an ardent Scottish nationalist, He was the founder of the Scottish National Movement which later merged to form the National Party of Scotland and which in turn merged to form the Scottish National Party He unsuccessfully contested a parliamentary seat for Midlothian and Peebles Northern at a by election in He also wrote poetry in English and Scots His Collected Poems were published in He investigated Scottish folklore and wrote about Brythonic rites and traditions in Mysteries of Celtic Britain In this book, Spence theorized that the original Britons were descendants of a people that migrated from Northwest Africa and were probably related to the Berbers and the BasquesSpence s researches into the mythology and culture of the New World, together with his examination of the cultures of western Europe and north west Africa, led him almost inevitably to the question of Atlantis During the s he published a series of books which sought to rescue the topic from the occultists who hador less brought it into disrepute These works, amongst which were The Problem of Atlantis and History of Atlantis , continued the line of research inaugurated by Ignatius Donnelly and looked at the lost island as a Bronze Age civilization, that formed a cultural link with the New World, which he invoked through examples he found of striking parallels between the early civilizations of the Old and New WorldsSpence s erudition and the width of his reading, his industry and imagination were all impressive yet the conclusions he reached, avoiding peer reviewed journals, have been almost universally rejected by mainstream scholarship His popularisations met stiff criticism in professional journals, but his continued appeal among theory hobbyists is summed up by a reviewer of The Problem of Atlantis in The Geographical Journal Mr Spence is an industrious writer, and, even if he fails to convince, has done service in marshalling the evidence and has produced an entertaining volume which is well worth reading Nevertheless, he seems to have had some influence upon the ideas of controversial author Immanuel Velikovsky, and as his books have come into the public domain, they have been successfully reprinted and some have been scanned for the InternetSpence s book Occult Causes of the Present War seems to have been the first book in the field of Nazi occultismOver his long career, he publishedthan forty books, many of which remain in print to this day.


10 thoughts on “Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends (Library of Essential Reading)

  1. Victoria Ray Victoria Ray says:

    It is a very special book for those who enjoy reading a bitold fashioned language interested in Egyptian Mythologybut can confuse those who doesn t know much about ancient Egypt, Gods, Animal Worship, dark sides of Religion I used it mostly for research and inspiration ideas for my writing I believe it contains excellent information about the Egypt past we don t know It is a very special book for those who enjoy reading a bitold fashioned language interested in Egyptian Mythologybut can confuse those who doesn t know much about ancient Egypt, Gods, Animal Worship, dark sides of Religion I used it mostly for research and inspiration ideas for my writing I believe it contains excellent information about the Egypt past we don t know

  2. Paul Haspel Paul Haspel says:

    Ancient Egypt s mythology is intricate and multi layered and for that reason, it can be a challenge for the modern reader to understand how the gods and goddesses of the Egyptian pantheon, and their stories, interrelate Lewis Spence s Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends can provide a helpful introduction to classical Egyptian mythology, though the alert reader should approach this book with a sense of its limitations.Author Lewis Spence 1874 1955 , a Scottish journalist and poet, was also a de Ancient Egypt s mythology is intricate and multi layered and for that reason, it can be a challenge for the modern reader to understand how the gods and goddesses of the Egyptian pantheon, and their stories, interrelate Lewis Spence s Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends can provide a helpful introduction to classical Egyptian mythology, though the alert reader should approach this book with a sense of its limitations.Author Lewis Spence 1874 1955 , a Scottish journalist and poet, was also a dedicated student of mythology, with a strong interest in the occult He published Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends in 1915 or, in other words, seven years before archaeologist Howard Carter turned the world of Egyptology upside down with his discovery of the tomb of the pharaoh Tutankhamun in 1922 Accordingly, some readers may find some of Spence s premises and conclusions incomplete and that s even before we consider the disheartening ease with which Spence uses terms like barbarian and savage to talk about civilizations that are different from his own.Spence approaches Egyptian myth in terms of the then relatively new field of comparative world mythology His debt to fellow Scot Sir James George Frazer s great pioneering work in that field, The Golden Bough 1880 , is evident at one point, Spence praises the manner in which Frazer pertinently examines various interpretations of the significance of the myth of Osiris By contrast, he seems hostile to the ideas of E.A Wallis Budge, the leading Egyptologist of his time, spending several pages of the book s first chapter seeking to refute Wallis Budge s claim that there is no fetishistic or totemic aspect to the Egyptian deities.Anyone who has toured sites of Egyptian antiquity, such as the Philae temple complex in Upper Egypt, knows that the myth of Isis and Osiris is among the most important in the entire Egyptian pantheon Briefly, the story is as follows Osiris was murdered and dismembered by his brother Set, god of evil Isis, wife of Osiris, recovered the scattered parts of Osiris body and resurrected her husband long enough that the two could have a child, the hawk headed god Horus Horus fought with and defeated Set and Osiris proceeded to the underworld, where he resides to this day as judge of the dead Spence comments thoughtfully on the significance of this myth, writing that We find the myths of the combat between Set and Horus evolving from a simple opposition of day and night into a combat between the two gods.The combat symbolized the moral idea of the victory of good over evil, and those of the dead who were justified were regarded as having overcome Set as Horus had done p 100.Spence also does well at setting forth the history of religious practice in pharaonic Egypt, providing examples of change and continuity in terms of how the Egyptians practiced their faith, as when he talks of social and religious changes that occurred at the beginning of what Egyptologists call the Late Period, around 700 B.C Toward the end of the eighth century B.C a great religious reaction set in Hitherto the brilliant opening of the New Empire, particularly the time of Rameses II, had set a model for the pious of the Late period now the Old Kingdom, its monuments, rites, and customs, its fervent piety and its proud conservatism, was become the model epoch for the entire nation It was, however, less a faithful copy than a caricature of the Old Kingdom.All that was most strange and outrin the ancient religion was sought out and emulated Old monuments and religious literature were studied the language and orthography of long past centuries were revived and adopted and if much of this was incomprehensible to the bulk of the people, its very mystery but made it thesacred. p 301 Yet not all of the Egyptian stories included in this volume were myths meant to elucidate sacred truths of the Egyptian religion from pharaonic times some were stories that were set down simply to entertain These stories of magic and royal intrigue, which might remind some readers of the tales from the 1001 Nights, include the story of The Prophecy of Dedi from the Westcar papyrus in the Berlin Museum Like a number of the stories from The Arabian Nights, The Prophecy of Dedi makes a point of combining magic oriented plot devices with some historical elements in order to enhance the story s verisimilitude it is described as taking place in the time of Khufu and his son Khafra or Cheops and his son Chephren , the 4th dynasty pharaohs who built the two largest of the Pyramids of Giza back around 2500 B.C.As the story has it, Dedi s reputed ability to restore life to the dead draws the attention of Khufu, who feels that such knowledge would perhaps be of use to him in the construction of his pyramid p 201 Dedi is summoned, and proves his magical abilities by bringing a decapitated duck back to life into the bargain, he reassures the pharaoh Khufu, who is worried about the long term prospects for his dynasty, by prophesying that thy son shall reign, and thy son s son p 202 something that any Egyptian of that time could verify, simply by paying a visit to the three pyramids of Khufu and Khafra and Menkaure The expository passages of Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends can be heavy going by contrast, when Spence lets go of his anxiety to demonstrate his scholarly bona fides, and simply tells the stories, the book is most successful Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends is helpfully illustrated with photographs of papyri, statuary, mummies human and animal , pyramids, and temples, as well as some paintings by book illustrator Evelyn Paul that capture the lush and romantic quality of the myths Some of Spence s ideas definitely need to be taken with the proverbial grain of salt later in his career, he became one of the first proponents of the idea that the Nazi regime in Germany had to have been generated by malevolent occult forces as if the human capacity for evil had not already been made clear on many occasions before the Nazis came to power, and has not been abundantly demonstrated many times since the Nazi regime s collapse Yet Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends still provides a rather helpful, if inevitably a rather dated, survey.And Spence s work still seems to enjoy a degree of respect among at least some contemporary Egyptians I encountered Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends at a gift shop in Luxor not the temple complex in Upper Egypt, but rather the Egyptian themed, pyramid shaped gambling casino complex in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.A The gift shop staff, in an apparent nod toward authenticity, were all Egyptian and when the lady at the checkout counter saw that I had skipped the plastic snow globe pyramids and the King Tut T shirts, and had instead selected the Dover Books edition of Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends, she nodded gravely, looked up at me, and said, You chose well

  3. Sam Sam says:

    This was the hardest book I ve ever tried to get through and I really wanted to get through it When I started reading it, I was thinking to myself throughout the introduction that the author just seemed like he was trying to sound smart, but many of his sentences were incomplete It took me many lunch breaks to get through the introduction alone I finally checked out the date and realized that it was written over one hundred years ago However, I ve read many excerpts from books and news artic This was the hardest book I ve ever tried to get through and I really wanted to get through it When I started reading it, I was thinking to myself throughout the introduction that the author just seemed like he was trying to sound smart, but many of his sentences were incomplete It took me many lunch breaks to get through the introduction alone I finally checked out the date and realized that it was written over one hundred years ago However, I ve read many excerpts from books and news articles from that time that weren t written as poorly as this book You would think that whoever edited it to publish in a newer version would at least make the sentences complete, but that wasn t the case Aside from that, the author seemed like he was blurting out his opinions, rather than actual facts Putting aside all of the crap I ve read on the internet, this is the first actual book on Egyptian myths that I ve read which is why I wanted to get through it so much , but I feel like I m going to have to read some other books to a figure out what the author was trying to convey, and b get actual facts, rather than opinions All in all, the book wasn t too terrible Once I got past the introduction, it was easier to get through However, I definitely would not read it again or recommend it to somebody who wants to read about Egyptian myths and legends which didn t seem to be a big part of the book, anyway I d definitely try to find another book for that I don t even think I could put this book in the Educational category If you do decide to read it, good luck

  4. Emma Lou Emma Lou says:

    You could tell that it was written in the last century off of it s writing style without even having to look at the publication date, but that was just fine with me Some people have a harder time reading things that are written in this way, or they think it s annoying, but I had no problems with it I picked it up research into the myths and stories of Egypt, and I got not only some stories that I had never heard before, but also a look into how these stories originated, how they effected Egypt You could tell that it was written in the last century off of it s writing style without even having to look at the publication date, but that was just fine with me Some people have a harder time reading things that are written in this way, or they think it s annoying, but I had no problems with it I picked it up research into the myths and stories of Egypt, and I got not only some stories that I had never heard before, but also a look into how these stories originated, how they effected Egyptian culture, and the history that could be taken from them All in all, good for the light research I was looking for

  5. Kadri Kadri says:

    Olen alati olnud huvitatud erinevate rahvaste ning kultuuride m tidest ja legendidest, seega asusin ka seda teost hinaga uurima Siiski ei suutnud ma kaugemale lugeda poolest sissejuhatusest Juba eess nas igustab Spence enda seisukohti, viidates, et ta on k llalt tark, et tunnustatud ekspertidele vastu vaielda Kiirest googeldamisest selgus, et tegu oli oti ajakirjaniku ja folkloristiga, kes ritas oma elu jooksul kirjutada v ga mitmel erineval teemal Juba sissejuhatuses tuleb esile leo Olen alati olnud huvitatud erinevate rahvaste ning kultuuride m tidest ja legendidest, seega asusin ka seda teost hinaga uurima Siiski ei suutnud ma kaugemale lugeda poolest sissejuhatusest Juba eess nas igustab Spence enda seisukohti, viidates, et ta on k llalt tark, et tunnustatud ekspertidele vastu vaielda Kiirest googeldamisest selgus, et tegu oli oti ajakirjaniku ja folkloristiga, kes ritas oma elu jooksul kirjutada v ga mitmel erineval teemal Juba sissejuhatuses tuleb esile leolev suhtumine, mis autoril uuritava kultuuri vastu on Tegemist on t pilise 20 sajandi alguse raamatuga, mis tegeleb madalama rahvuse kultuuri kirjeldamisega

  6. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    Although full of information, this was terribly dry and a struggle to get through at parts Originally published in 1915, it s very much a book for it s time, referring to people and civilizations as savages Since that year there has beendiscovery and research and I m sure there areup to date books about Egypt s myths and legends It s my own fault for not seeing this was published in 1915 so that s on me.

  7. Lizz Lizz says:

    I found this book and was glad to see that it was printed in 1985 but yikes Turns out it was originally published in 1915 Much of the information is outdated or comes solely from Spence s imagination Even worse is the white savior narrative it s muchobvious here than it is in Budge s writing.

  8. Joshua C. Joshua C. says:

    A lot of the history is inaccurate This is a very old book, so the understanding of Ancient Egyptian culture is pretty outdated It is still fairly in line with the circumstances during the late New Kingdom around the time when the empire was really starting to finally fall apart, but most of these claims do not apply to the preceding bulk and meat of the 3,000 year era of the Ancient Egyptian Civilization Additionally, Spence comes at his subject as a comparative mythologist, and that agenda A lot of the history is inaccurate This is a very old book, so the understanding of Ancient Egyptian culture is pretty outdated It is still fairly in line with the circumstances during the late New Kingdom around the time when the empire was really starting to finally fall apart, but most of these claims do not apply to the preceding bulk and meat of the 3,000 year era of the Ancient Egyptian Civilization Additionally, Spence comes at his subject as a comparative mythologist, and that agenda radically skews his interpretation of the Ancient Egyptian religious tradition so that he makes innumerable claims about the Ancient Egyptian pantheon, of its analogous symmetry to other ancient religions and of a dialectical influence working between the development of the Ancient Egyptian cosmology and that of those of its nearby contemporaries His theory for the AnimismFetishism TotemismPolytheism development of the early Ancient Egyptian religion comes as an unquestioned schema common to the comparative religion approach In this case it seems Spence allowed this presumption to blind him, because, though he elaborately asserts that this developmental structure applies to the Ancient Egyptians, there is actually very little evidence to suggest that it does in fact apply Actually the evidence tends to show a different development directly from animism into anthropomorphic psuedo henotheism I m also somewhat disappointed with his shamelessly scant treatment of the Cult of Aten, which deserved farattention than many of his other elaborations.All those things aside, this book does contain a very satisfying account of the major myth narratives unique to that civilization, and anyone seeking to know those stories will be able to find them here.Overall, the meat of the book is its content, and it s content is very good The fat of Spence s opinions which ornament the content, that fat is outdated and unsavory But for a reader who can cut past the fat to pull out the meat it garnishes will find a meal very worth eating, or a book well worth being read But maybe compliment this book with the wine of The Culture of Ancient Egypt by John A Wilson, who is much fairer in presenting the historical religious development without imposing anachronistic assumptions

  9. Mel Mel says:

    This book was a lovely collection of Egyptian myths and literature The translations were great Unfortunately whenever the author started talking about his own theories I really wanted to punch him in the face He s one of the early 20th century religious theorists who see religion as progressing from savage to monotheism with all the vaule judgements that entails So when discussing Ancient Egyptian religion he relates it back to the savages of North and Central America and tries to use This book was a lovely collection of Egyptian myths and literature The translations were great Unfortunately whenever the author started talking about his own theories I really wanted to punch him in the face He s one of the early 20th century religious theorists who see religion as progressing from savage to monotheism with all the vaule judgements that entails So when discussing Ancient Egyptian religion he relates it back to the savages of North and Central America and tries to use examples from their primative religion to explain early ideas about Egyptian religion and argues against what the Egyptologists say At times such comments come across as outwardly racist For example, Gods of African origin are figured as hideous, frightful, distorted, and enormously fat creatures, resembling the negro human fetish which may be found today among African tribes 280 281 He also states how the Egyptian mind is incapable of abstract thought 283 which I have to say seems to be taking this whole progress idea a little to far I m not sure if I can recommend this There s such a terrible underlying philosophy of religion to this book and it s almost impossible to just read the stories without getting the author s bias coming through If you can find another collection I d read that instead Or if you do read this, read the section on Egyptian literature as that s the nicest, some fantastic stories without too much of the author s bias coming through

  10. Paul Haspel Paul Haspel says:

    Lewis Spence s Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends was originally published in 1915, seven years before the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun Spence, a folklorist and student of the occult, approaches Egyptian myth in terms of the then relatively new study of world mythology his debt to James Frazer s The Golden Bough is evident, as is his tendency to quarrel with then renowned Egyptologist E.A Wallis Budge This is the same Wallis Budge of whom James Spader s renegade Egyptologist in the Lewis Spence s Ancient Egyptian Myths and Legends was originally published in 1915, seven years before the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun Spence, a folklorist and student of the occult, approaches Egyptian myth in terms of the then relatively new study of world mythology his debt to James Frazer s The Golden Bough is evident, as is his tendency to quarrel with then renowned Egyptologist E.A Wallis Budge This is the same Wallis Budge of whom James Spader s renegade Egyptologist in the movie Stargate scornfully says, I can t believe they re still reprinting him Some expository sections of this book are relatively heavy going At other times, when Spence simply shares with us some of the myths and legends, the book soars Helpfully illustrated with photographs of papyri, statuary, mummies human and animal , pyramids, and temples, as well as some paintings by book illustrator Evelyn Paul that capture the lush and romantic quality of the myths The ease with which Spence uses words like barbarian and savage may grate on modern ears Still, it s a helpful if somewhat dated survey

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *