Writings on Civil Disobedience and Non violence Kindle

Writings on Civil Disobedience and Non violence Kindle


Writings on Civil Disobedience and Non violence [PDF / Epub] ☉ Writings on Civil Disobedience and Non violence By Leo Tolstoy – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Writings on Civil Disobedience and Nonviolence This is one of the very best top greatest collections of writings on Nonviolent Civil Disobedience ever assembled As I recall Tolstoy was inspired by Hen Writings Civil Disobedience and Non MOBI :Þ on Civil Disobedience and Nonviolence This Civil Disobedience Kindle Ö is one of the very best top greatest collections Writings on Epub / of writings on Nonviolent Civil Disobedience ever assembled As I recall Tolstoy was inspired by Henry David on Civil Disobedience PDF ☆ Thoreau re his political views and in turn inspired Gandhi and King These collected writings show him on Civil Disobedience and Non ePUB ´ at his most biting sarcastic and realistic best Anyone who has not read this collection on Civil Disobedience and Non ePUB ´ is missing one of the joys of life Writings on civil disobedience and nonviolence Tolstoy's Writings on Civil Disobedience and Non violence Leo Tolstoy graf Snippet view Common terms and phrases Alexander army artificially Austria authorities become believe benefit called Christ Christ’s teaching Christian Church CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE command Congress conscience consciousness contrary cruel death deceit deeds definite demands desire destroy diflicult doctrine Writings on Civil Disobedience and Nonviolence by James Baldwin Writings on Race Class and Civil A Oscar nominated documentary was inspired by Baldwin’s writing on race class and the Civil Rights era in America The documentary called I Am Not Your Negro examines the lives and work of three Civil Rights leaders Medgar Evers Martin Luther King Jr Malcolm X At the same time it urges audiences to consider how racial tensions and attitudes continue to influence our culture Tolstoy's writings on civil disobedience and non Tolstoy's Writings on Civil Disobedience and Non violence New York Bergman Publishers OCoLC Document Type Book All Authors Contributors Leo Tolstoy graf Find information about OCLC Number Description pages illustrations ; cm Contents The beginning of the end Two wars Notes for officers Notes for soldiers On patriotism Carthago Tolstoy's writings on civil disobedience and non Tolstoy's Writings on Civil Disobedience and Non violence Leo Tolstoy graf Snippet view Common terms and phrases Alexander alliance army Austria authorities become believe called Christ Christ's teaching Christian Church command Congress conscience contrary Council of Nicaea cruel death deceit deeds demands desire destroy doctrine Drozhin Dukhobors emperor enemies ERNEST Writings on Slavery and the American Civil War by Find many great new used options and get the best deals for Writings on Slavery and the American Civil War by Harriet Martineau Hardcover at the best Report writing on civil | AutoCAD | Civil Engineering Research Writing Technical Writing Projects for Urgent Need of freelancer have a good knowledge about academic and civil engineering rest of information come to the PCB Dissident writings as political theory on civil society Dissident writings as political theory on civil society and democracy Volume Issue MARLIES GLASIUS Skip to main content We use cookies to distinguish you from other users and to provide you with a better experience on our websites Review Captain America Civil War – THE WRITINGS ON THE WALL THE WRITINGS ON THE WALL Menu Reviews films; Reviews sries; Micro critiues; Rtro critiues; Analyses; Reviews films Review Captain America Civil War Publi par ThomasL le mai mai Il y a un an Avengers Age of Ultron concluait l’ingale phase du Marvel Cinematic Universe MCU en dpit de la sortie uelues semaines plus tard d’Ant Man le vritable dernier.

  • unknown
  • 426 pages
  • Writings on Civil Disobedience and Non violence
  • Leo Tolstoy
  • English
  • 01 April 2014
  • 9780720687019

About the Author: Leo Tolstoy

Лев Civil Disobedience and Non MOBI :Þ Николаевич Толстой; commonly Leo Tolstoy in Civil Disobedience Kindle Ö Anglophone countries was a Russian writer who primarily wrote Writings on Epub / novels and short stories Later in life he also wrote plays and essays His two most famous on Civil Disobedience PDF ☆ works the novels War and Peace and Anna Karenina are acknowledged as two of the greatest novels on Civil Disobedience and Non ePUB ´ of all time and a pinnacle of realist fiction Many consider Tolstoy to have been on Civil Disobedience and Non ePUB ´ one of the world's greatest novelists Tolstoy is eually known for his complicated and paradoxical persona and for his extreme moralistic and ascetic views which he adopted after a moral crisis and spiritual awakening in the s after which he also became noted as a moral thinker and social reformerHis literal interpretation of the ethical teachings of Jesus centering on the Sermon on the Mount caused him in later life to become a fervent Christian anarchist and anarcho pacifist His ideas on nonviolent resistance expressed in such works as The Kingdom of God Is Within You were to have a profound impact on such pivotal twentieth century figures as Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr.



10 thoughts on “Writings on Civil Disobedience and Non violence

  1. Larry Bassett Larry Bassett says:

    In Writings on Civil Disobedience and Nonviolence Tolstoy is a little heavy on the Christianity for me even if he is talking about the good Jesus Christianity rather than the bad institutional Christianity I gave it three stars an extra one because the topic of nonviolent civil disobedience is not found in much writing I found it hard to get to the end of this book It began to seem like I was reading the same thing over and over Tolstoy’s writing is from 150 years ago and represents a part of the foundation for this modern day philosophy Got to tip my hat to an ethic that says I would rather die than violate my conscience A conversation about doing the right thing regardless of the conseuences with Immanuel Kant who lived in the 18th century and Tolstoy would be interesting Tolstoy lived in Russia from 1828 until 1910 Most people know him because of War Peace and Anna Karenina; fewer know that he was a pacifist and Christian anarchist when he died Writings on Civil Disobedience and Nonviolence is a collection of letters and essaysYou might say that Tolstoy originated the phrase Power to the People He says that a belief can start with one person and spread to the masses from there His core belief is “I will not kill” He did not believe in the institutional Christian church premising his Christian belief on Jesus “Only the complete and utter destruction of institutionalized Christianity in all it manifestations would according to Tolstoy open the way for a full appreciation and acceptance of Jesus” said David Albert in the introduction to the book A friend of mine Wally Nelson was a war tax resister in western Massachusetts during the last half of the 20th century He must have read Tolstoy because he had a story that he often repeated Wally would say What if a man came to your door asking you for money so he could kill a person you didn’t know? Would you give him money? Then Wally would spring the trap This is like the IRS collecting income taxes from you so the US can kill people you don’t even know in other parts of the world Why do you pay to kill those other people? Tolstoy is very clear “You are told in the Gospel that one should not only refrain from killing his brothers but should not do that which leads to murder one should not be angry with one’s brothers nor hate one’s enemies but love them”Now I am not a religious person but I can relate to the organized Church being a force for evil and Jesus being a role model worthy of emulation Tolstoy takes this uite literally Tolstoy is severe He uses hard and damning words perversion fraud idolatry abhorrent “We by God’s grace the autocratic great Emperor of all Russia King of Poland Grand Duke of Finland etc etc proclaim to all our true subjects that for the welfare of these our beloved subjects beueathed by God into our care we have found it our duty before God to send them to slaughter God be with us” Made Tolstoy want to pukeTolstoy wants all to say to the ruler impressing men into the military “Hell no We won’t go” He says “The governments may and should fear those who refuse to serve and indeed they are afraid of them because every refusal undermines the prestige of the deceit by which the governments have the people in their power But those who refuse have no ground whatever to fear a government that demands crimes from them In refusing military service every man risks much less than he would were he to enter it” Ah but aren’t people in Tolstoy’s day in the 19th century afraid of the conseuence of this civil disobedience and nonviolence? “But what will happen when all people refuse military service and there is no check nor hold over the wicked and the wicked triumph and there is no protection against savage people – against the yellow race – who will come and conuer us?” You could fast forward to 2010 and hear the same arguments Tolstoy replies “I will say nothing about the fact that as it is the wicked have long been triumphing” And he goes on Is he convincing? Apparently not since we are still having the same argument 150 years later And it is true throughout these letters and essays written in the 19th century they could be letters to the editor in the 21st century Tolstoy like the uakers and Mennonites was blazing a path that some of us still try to follow As Martin Luther King Jr and Gandhi learned from Tolstoy the power of civil disobedience is our willingness to suffer the conseuences of our actions “Notwithstanding the admonitions of the authorities and threats that they and their families will continue to suffer until they consent to fulfill military duties those who have refused to do so do not change their decision These men say We are Christians and therefore cannot consent to be murderers You may torture and kill us we cannot hinder that but we cannot obey you”And as the movement grows it becomes harder for the government to control “In our time it is impossible unperceived to sweep off the face of the earth a religious moral and industrious population of ten thousand souls”What does this writing from the 19th century have to say to us in the 21st century? And similarly what of the words of the American writer Henry David Thoreau who wrote On the Duty of Civil Disobedience at the same period of the 19th Century? Social action and social criticism is an international reality even in the face of awful conseuences “on the one hand we find men professing the principles of liberty euality and fraternity on the other hand we see these same men ready in the name of liberty to yield the most abject and slavish obedience; in the name of euality to approve the most rigid and senseless subdivision of men into classes; and in the name of fraternity ready to slay their own brothers”The line is drawn “You wish me to be a murderer and I cannot do this; both God and my own conscience forbid it And therefore do with me what you wish but I will not kill or prepare for murder or assist in it”According to Tolstoy you cannot oppose evil with violence; he called that non resistance Today we would call it nonviolence“Non resistance to evil by violence really means only that the mutual interaction of rational beings upon each other should consist not in violence but in rational persuasion; and that conseuently towards this substitution of rational persuasion for coercion all those should strive who desire to further the welfare of mankind”

  2. Margie Margie says:

    Tolstoy is brilliant of course I just wish this book were better edited The various pieces Tolstoy wrote are given no context; no dates only occasional information on why a piece was written and a dearth of information on where pieces were originally published Very frustrating for a researcher Lots of writing on nonviolence though on resistance to the state and the perils of patriotism

  3. Cyndi Cyndi says:

    Tolstoy saw that the very basic human interactions were where peace begins Peace isn't going to come about through government programs or international organizations In this series of essays he investigates several isssues from multiple angles Policymakers soldiers and citizens are thoughtfully considered He pokes holes in the standard ways of thinking about war and peace He can be preachy but all in all this is an excellent collection that presents important viewpoints

  4. Ale Ale says:

    Huolimatta siitä että kirja on kirjoitettu jo satakunta vuotta sitten Tolstoin ajatukset ovat edelleen hyvin ajankohtaiset ja terävät Kirjan tekstityyli on välillä nykypäivään turhan raskas mutta kontekstiin asetettuna toimiva Rauhanliikkeen klassikko

  5. Morthen Morthen says:

    Rehellistä ja suoraa rauhaan ja omantunnon kuuntelemiseen ja teoista vastuunkantavaan toimintaan tähtäävää kirjoitusta joka vaikka kirjoitettu 18001900 lukujen vaihteessa on edelleen ja tullee aina olemaan ajattoman ajankohtainen

  6. Noora Karoliina Noora Karoliina says:

    Tätä lukiessa tuntui että astuin aurinkoisella bussipysäkillä kirja kädessä yhteiskunnan sääntöjen tuolle puolen kohti oikeutta ja totuutta niin väkevää tekstiä se ajoittain oli

  7. Saku Haataja Saku Haataja says:

    Mielenkiintoisia näkökulmia rauhanaatteesta ja patriotismin vastustamisesta

  8. Juuso Juuso says:

    Hallitukset vakuuttavat kansoille että näitä uhkaavat vaarat toisten kansojen hyökkäys ja sisäiset viholliset ja että ainoa keino pelastua tuolta vaaralta on kansojen orjamainen alistuminen hallitusten tahtoon Se näkyy aivan ilmiselvästi vallankumousten ja diktatuurien aikana ja niin tapahtuu aina ja kaikkialla missä vain valtaa on Jokainen hallitus selittää olemassaolonsa ja perustelee kaikki väkivallantekonsa sillä että ellei sitä olisi olisi pahemmin Saatuaan kansat vakuuttuneiksi siitä että ne ovat vaarassa hallitukset alistavat ne tahtoonsa Kun kansat sitten ovat alistuneet hallitustensa tahtoon nuo hallitukset pakottavat kansat hyökkäämään toisten kansojen kimppuun Ja niin kansat saavat vahvistuksen hallitusten vakuutteluihin toisten kansojen taholta uhkaavasta hyökkäysvaarastaDivide et impera Hajota ja hallitse

  9. Elisa Elisa says:

    ”Ja kun kysyin häneltä eivätkö omatunto ja noiden tekojen muisto vaivanneet häntä hän ei ymmärtänyt minua ollenkaan Sehän tapahtui sodassa laillisesti tsaarin ja isänmaan puolesta”Tolstoin Omatuntoja esseekokoelma on rauhankirjallisuuden klassikko joka on ensimmäisen kerran ilmestynyt suomeksi vuonna 1981 nimellä Omantunnon kujanjuoksu Alunperin tekstit on peräisin 1800 luvun viimeisiltä ja 1900 luvun ensimmäisiltä vuosilta Tolstoin kynä on kunnioitettavan terävä ja suorastaan aikamoisen sivalteleva hänen puolustaessaan ihmisen velvollisuutta käyttää ”järjen valoa” Poliittisen kontekstin tunteminen auttaa suhteuttamaan kirjoitukset tuon ajan ajatteluun yleisesti

  10. Robert Beatty Robert Beatty says:

    A truly exceptional piece of philosophy Our entire society could be built of this short set of essays I don't understand why it's not taught as a major and important work One of the key premises is that governments start wars and ask or tell their citizens to fight them but if we as citizens simply didn't fight didn't pick up the weapons then the wars of the world would end Tolstoy describes what one might call a Christian anarchy a world where government and laws aren't needed because people act with morality rather than in subservience to laws or fear of punishment I know it sounds naive but Tolstoy lays it all out in a convincing way His believes on civil disobedience and nonviolence which are very Martin Luther King in nature are excellent as well

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10 thoughts on “Writings on Civil Disobedience and Non violence

  1. Larry Bassett Larry Bassett says:

    In Writings on Civil Disobedience and Nonviolence Tolstoy is a little heavy on the Christianity for me even if he is talking about the good Jesus Christianity rather than the bad institutional Christianity I gave it three stars an extra one because the topic of nonviolent civil disobedience is not found in much writing I found it hard to get to the end of this book It began to seem like I was reading the same thing over and over Tolstoy’s writing is from 150 years ago and represents a part of the foundation for this modern day philosophy Got to tip my hat to an ethic that says I would rather die than violate my conscience A conversation about doing the right thing regardless of the conseuences with Immanuel Kant who lived in the 18th century and Tolstoy would be interesting Tolstoy lived in Russia from 1828 until 1910 Most people know him because of War Peace and Anna Karenina; fewer know that he was a pacifist and Christian anarchist when he died Writings on Civil Disobedience and Nonviolence is a collection of letters and essaysYou might say that Tolstoy originated the phrase Power to the People He says that a belief can start with one person and spread to the masses from there His core belief is “I will not kill” He did not believe in the institutional Christian church premising his Christian belief on Jesus “Only the complete and utter destruction of institutionalized Christianity in all it manifestations would according to Tolstoy open the way for a full appreciation and acceptance of Jesus” said David Albert in the introduction to the book A friend of mine Wally Nelson was a war tax resister in western Massachusetts during the last half of the 20th century He must have read Tolstoy because he had a story that he often repeated Wally would say What if a man came to your door asking you for money so he could kill a person you didn’t know? Would you give him money? Then Wally would spring the trap This is like the IRS collecting income taxes from you so the US can kill people you don’t even know in other parts of the world Why do you pay to kill those other people? Tolstoy is very clear “You are told in the Gospel that one should not only refrain from killing his brothers but should not do that which leads to murder one should not be angry with one’s brothers nor hate one’s enemies but love them”Now I am not a religious person but I can relate to the organized Church being a force for evil and Jesus being a role model worthy of emulation Tolstoy takes this uite literally Tolstoy is severe He uses hard and damning words perversion fraud idolatry abhorrent “We by God’s grace the autocratic great Emperor of all Russia King of Poland Grand Duke of Finland etc etc proclaim to all our true subjects that for the welfare of these our beloved subjects beueathed by God into our care we have found it our duty before God to send them to slaughter God be with us” Made Tolstoy want to pukeTolstoy wants all to say to the ruler impressing men into the military “Hell no We won’t go” He says “The governments may and should fear those who refuse to serve and indeed they are afraid of them because every refusal undermines the prestige of the deceit by which the governments have the people in their power But those who refuse have no ground whatever to fear a government that demands crimes from them In refusing military service every man risks much less than he would were he to enter it” Ah but aren’t people in Tolstoy’s day in the 19th century afraid of the conseuence of this civil disobedience and nonviolence? “But what will happen when all people refuse military service and there is no check nor hold over the wicked and the wicked triumph and there is no protection against savage people – against the yellow race – who will come and conuer us?” You could fast forward to 2010 and hear the same arguments Tolstoy replies “I will say nothing about the fact that as it is the wicked have long been triumphing” And he goes on Is he convincing? Apparently not since we are still having the same argument 150 years later And it is true throughout these letters and essays written in the 19th century they could be letters to the editor in the 21st century Tolstoy like the uakers and Mennonites was blazing a path that some of us still try to follow As Martin Luther King Jr and Gandhi learned from Tolstoy the power of civil disobedience is our willingness to suffer the conseuences of our actions “Notwithstanding the admonitions of the authorities and threats that they and their families will continue to suffer until they consent to fulfill military duties those who have refused to do so do not change their decision These men say We are Christians and therefore cannot consent to be murderers You may torture and kill us we cannot hinder that but we cannot obey you”And as the movement grows it becomes harder for the government to control “In our time it is impossible unperceived to sweep off the face of the earth a religious moral and industrious population of ten thousand souls”What does this writing from the 19th century have to say to us in the 21st century? And similarly what of the words of the American writer Henry David Thoreau who wrote On the Duty of Civil Disobedience at the same period of the 19th Century? Social action and social criticism is an international reality even in the face of awful conseuences “on the one hand we find men professing the principles of liberty euality and fraternity on the other hand we see these same men ready in the name of liberty to yield the most abject and slavish obedience; in the name of euality to approve the most rigid and senseless subdivision of men into classes; and in the name of fraternity ready to slay their own brothers”The line is drawn “You wish me to be a murderer and I cannot do this; both God and my own conscience forbid it And therefore do with me what you wish but I will not kill or prepare for murder or assist in it”According to Tolstoy you cannot oppose evil with violence; he called that non resistance Today we would call it nonviolence“Non resistance to evil by violence really means only that the mutual interaction of rational beings upon each other should consist not in violence but in rational persuasion; and that conseuently towards this substitution of rational persuasion for coercion all those should strive who desire to further the welfare of mankind”

  2. Margie Margie says:

    Tolstoy is brilliant of course I just wish this book were better edited The various pieces Tolstoy wrote are given no context; no dates only occasional information on why a piece was written and a dearth of information on where pieces were originally published Very frustrating for a researcher Lots of writing on nonviolence though on resistance to the state and the perils of patriotism

  3. Cyndi Cyndi says:

    Tolstoy saw that the very basic human interactions were where peace begins Peace isn't going to come about through government programs or international organizations In this series of essays he investigates several isssues from multiple angles Policymakers soldiers and citizens are thoughtfully considered He pokes holes in the standard ways of thinking about war and peace He can be preachy but all in all this is an excellent collection that presents important viewpoints

  4. Ale Ale says:

    Huolimatta siitä että kirja on kirjoitettu jo satakunta vuotta sitten Tolstoin ajatukset ovat edelleen hyvin ajankohtaiset ja terävät Kirjan tekstityyli on välillä nykypäivään turhan raskas mutta kontekstiin asetettuna toimiva Rauhanliikkeen klassikko

  5. Morthen Morthen says:

    Rehellistä ja suoraa rauhaan ja omantunnon kuuntelemiseen ja teoista vastuunkantavaan toimintaan tähtäävää kirjoitusta joka vaikka kirjoitettu 18001900 lukujen vaihteessa on edelleen ja tullee aina olemaan ajattoman ajankohtainen

  6. Noora Karoliina Noora Karoliina says:

    Tätä lukiessa tuntui että astuin aurinkoisella bussipysäkillä kirja kädessä yhteiskunnan sääntöjen tuolle puolen kohti oikeutta ja totuutta niin väkevää tekstiä se ajoittain oli

  7. Saku Haataja Saku Haataja says:

    Mielenkiintoisia näkökulmia rauhanaatteesta ja patriotismin vastustamisesta

  8. Juuso Juuso says:

    Hallitukset vakuuttavat kansoille että näitä uhkaavat vaarat toisten kansojen hyökkäys ja sisäiset viholliset ja että ainoa keino pelastua tuolta vaaralta on kansojen orjamainen alistuminen hallitusten tahtoon Se näkyy aivan ilmiselvästi vallankumousten ja diktatuurien aikana ja niin tapahtuu aina ja kaikkialla missä vain valtaa on Jokainen hallitus selittää olemassaolonsa ja perustelee kaikki väkivallantekonsa sillä että ellei sitä olisi olisi pahemmin Saatuaan kansat vakuuttuneiksi siitä että ne ovat vaarassa hallitukset alistavat ne tahtoonsa Kun kansat sitten ovat alistuneet hallitustensa tahtoon nuo hallitukset pakottavat kansat hyökkäämään toisten kansojen kimppuun Ja niin kansat saavat vahvistuksen hallitusten vakuutteluihin toisten kansojen taholta uhkaavasta hyökkäysvaarastaDivide et impera Hajota ja hallitse

  9. Elisa Elisa says:

    ”Ja kun kysyin häneltä eivätkö omatunto ja noiden tekojen muisto vaivanneet häntä hän ei ymmärtänyt minua ollenkaan Sehän tapahtui sodassa laillisesti tsaarin ja isänmaan puolesta”Tolstoin Omatuntoja esseekokoelma on rauhankirjallisuuden klassikko joka on ensimmäisen kerran ilmestynyt suomeksi vuonna 1981 nimellä Omantunnon kujanjuoksu Alunperin tekstit on peräisin 1800 luvun viimeisiltä ja 1900 luvun ensimmäisiltä vuosilta Tolstoin kynä on kunnioitettavan terävä ja suorastaan aikamoisen sivalteleva hänen puolustaessaan ihmisen velvollisuutta käyttää ”järjen valoa” Poliittisen kontekstin tunteminen auttaa suhteuttamaan kirjoitukset tuon ajan ajatteluun yleisesti

  10. Robert Beatty Robert Beatty says:

    A truly exceptional piece of philosophy Our entire society could be built of this short set of essays I don't understand why it's not taught as a major and important work One of the key premises is that governments start wars and ask or tell their citizens to fight them but if we as citizens simply didn't fight didn't pick up the weapons then the wars of the world would end Tolstoy describes what one might call a Christian anarchy a world where government and laws aren't needed because people act with morality rather than in subservience to laws or fear of punishment I know it sounds naive but Tolstoy lays it all out in a convincing way His believes on civil disobedience and nonviolence which are very Martin Luther King in nature are excellent as well

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *