The Scarlet Plague MOBI ↠ The Scarlet ePUB ´

The Scarlet Plague MOBI ↠ The Scarlet ePUB ´

The Scarlet Plague [Download] ➾ The Scarlet Plague ➹ Jack London – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Once the red rash appears it is too late The victims die within hours their rapidly decomposing bodies spreading the disease in the dust Art science and learning die with them while the few survivors Once the red rash appears it is too late The victims die within hours their rapidly decomposing bodies The Scarlet ePUB ´ spreading the disease in the dust Art science and learning die with them while the few survivors degenerate into feral clans This story takes place in sixty years after the great pandemic of  A former professor of literature―now a dirty old man in goatskin―tells his incredulous and uncomprehending grandsons I am the last man who was alive in the days of the plague and who knows the wonders of that far off time We who mastered the planet―its earth and sea and sky―and who were as very gods now live in primitive savageryJack London's The Scarlet Plague which originally appeared in The London Magazine in ranks among the earliest works of post apocalyptic fiction This pioneering science fiction novella like many of the master storyteller's other tales explores the thin line between civilization and barbarism Recounted with humor suspense and pathos London's harrowing vision of the future raises compelling uestions about social class knowledge and human nature.


About the Author: Jack London

Jack London was an American novelist journalist social activist and short story writer whose works deal romantically with The Scarlet ePUB ´ elemental struggles for survival At his peak he was the highest paid and the most popular of all living writers Because of early financial difficulties he was largely self educated past grammar schoolLondon drew heavily on his life experiences in his writing He spent ti.



10 thoughts on “The Scarlet Plague

  1. J.L. Sutton J.L. Sutton says:

    Very interesting More familiar to readers as the author of Call of the Wild and White Fang Jack London tackles a post apocalyptic dystopia in The Scarlet Plague originally published in 1912 The story is set in 2073 in a world largely depopulated by the pandemic that uickly spread around the world from the perspective of a former English professor of UC Berkeley James Howard Smith Smith recounts the plague that occurred 60 years earlier how it infected millions and cut would be survivors off from the rest of the world Really he recounts the end of civilization San Francisco and the whole East Bay is virtually uninhabited Since modern communication is no longer functioning he assumes that's the way it is everywhere Smith is a man who recognizes the pre plague world has disappeared; he would like to pass on his knowledge to a few survivors in hopes that civilization can be rebuilt However he knows mankind will repeat the same mistakes 35 stars rounded up because I strangely like hearing about my old stomping grounds even if they've been devastated by the plague 1949 reprint of The Scarlet Plague


  2. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    The Scarlet Plague‬‬‬ Sunlanders Master of Mystry The Scarlet Plague and Before Adam Jack LondonThe Scarlet Plague is a post apocalyptic fiction novel written by Jack London and originally published in London Magazine in 1912 The story takes place in 2073 sixty years after an uncontrollable epidemic the Red Death has depopulated the planet James Smith is one of the survivors of the era before the scarlet plague hit and is still left alive in the San Francisco area and he travels with his grandsons Edwin Hoo Hoo and Hare Lip His grandsons are young and live as primeval hunter gatherers in a heavily depopulated world Their intellect is limited as are their language abilities Edwin asks Smith whom they call Granser to tell them of the disease alternately referred to as scarlet plague scarlet death or red death تاریخ نخستین خوانش سال 1972میلادیعنوان طاعون سرخ شاهکار جک لندن، نویسنده جک لندن، مترجم گیورگیس آقاسی؛ مشخصات نشر تهران، انتشارات بنگاه آرمان، 1350، در 224ص؛ چاپ دیگر تهران، نشر طلوع؛ 1370؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی سده 20معنوان طاعون ارغوانی، نویسنده جک لندن، مترجم محمد مجلسی؛ مشخصات نشر تهران، دنیای نو، 1388، در 159ص، شابک 9789641720423؛ داستان‌های پنجگانه‌ ی این کتاب «دشمن همه دنیا»، «هجوم بی مانند»، «جالوت»، «حکایت عبرت آور» و «طاعون ارغوانی» از نوشته‌ های نگارنده در واپسین سال‌های عمر، در نخستین دهه‌ ی سده ی بیستم میلادی است؛ نویسنده در این‌جا از سده‌ های آینده نیز می‌نویسند، و به سرانگشت خیال، کتاب سرنوشت بشر را ورق می‌زنند، تا صفحات ناخوانده را جلوی چشم خوانشگران خویش بگذارند؛ در باره طاعون سرخ چکیده داستان این کتاب خوانشگر را به سال 2073میلادی میبرد؛ انتظار داریم دنیایی پیشرفته و متمدن پیش روی ما باشد؛ ولی انسانهایی را میبینیم، که با امکاناتی اندک، و همچون انسانهای نخستین زندگی میکنند؛ برهان این ماجرا چیست؟ پیشرفتهایی که مردمان بگذشته به دست آورده بودند کجا رفته است؟ این موضوع را تنها، پیرمردی به نام «جیمز اسمیت»، میتواند بازگو کند؛ زمانیکه نوه هایش از ایشان این پرسش را میپرسند، داستانی از شصت سال پیشتر را روایت میکند؛ زمانیکه جهان پیشرفت بسیاری کرده، و «اسمیت» استاد یکی از مشهورترین دانشگاههای «انگلستان» بوده است؛ همه چیز به خوبی پیش میرود، تا اینکه جهان، توسط خطری مرگبار، تهدید میشود؛ طاعون سرخ ؛ طاعون سرخ رمانی کوتاه، در سبک ادبیات داستانی رستاخیزی، و پسارستاخیزی، اثر «جک لندن»، نویسنده ی نام آشنای آمریکایی است، داستان نخستین بار در سال 1912میلادی، در مجله ی «لندن» چاپ شد؛ این کتاب در ایران، با عنوان «طاعون ارغوانی» نیز، به چاپ رسیده است؛ «جک لندن» در این اثر، همچون برخی دیگر از داستانهای خویش، آینده ی جامعه را، به تصویر کشیده است؛ از این نظر، میتوان ایشان را، با نویسندگانی همچون «ژول ورن»، «جورج ولز» و یا «جان کریستوفر»، قیاس کرد؛ ولی عینک دید ایشان، تفاوت بسیاری دارد؛ نگارنده، آینده ای تیره و تار را، در قالب داستان، برای خوانشگرانش بازگو میکند؛ آینده ای که پر از مشکلات و نابرابریهاست؛ برای همین است که شماری ایشان را نویسنده ای بدبین میدانندتاریخ بهنگام رسان 05071399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا شربیانی


  3. Simona B Simona B says:

    25Some will fight some will rule some will pray; and all the rest will toil and suffer sore while on their bleeding carcasses is reared again and yet again without end the amazing beauty and surpassing wonder of the civilized statePlease take my rating with a grain of salt It is mostly due to the fact that being The Scarlet Plague the perfect epitome of the classic imagery we all have nowadays of a post apocalyptic world I felt that the book had nothing new to say to me Of course having being written in 1912 whoever read it then or even just a few decades ago must have been able to perceive it rather differently The writing style and the fact that almost the whole story is recounted as an oral narrative are the two elements capable of making the novella distinguishable to my eyes at least Bill the Chauffeur's and Vesta's episode though again not new to our ears is probably one of the most evidently thought provoking parts of the story and the only on which my mind actually dwelt a bit longer Also the author's and the old man's reflections on language can be counted among the interesting bits The one conclusion I can draw out of this is that my beloved London has written far better things


  4. Jason Reeser Jason Reeser says:

    I had trouble reading this and believing that Jack London wrote this one hundred years ago I kept expecting to discover this was a different Jack London one who wrote in the late 1950s or 1960s This was far too evolved to be something written by a man in 1912 However it supposedly is Jack London it really is but I can't seem to rid myself of the doubt So with that in mindWow this story is perfectly told A tight fun read about the end of civilization London's futuristic view of the world is pretty amazing He predicts that in 2013 there would be 8 billion people Today's world population is 7175 billion Considering the number of people who died in the wars from last century I'd say London had it right Or as my daughter suggested someone helped him with him math A plague hits the world in 2013 and reduces the population down to under one thousand people scattered throughout the world The story of the plague is only told as a memory since London's story follows an old man the last survivor of the apocalypse as he tells his grandchildren about the fall of civilizationThe grandchildren are basically savages having been raised with little knowledge of the previous world It is my only complaint about the book I do think we would regress a bit if this happened but I don't think it would happen so uickly Maybe the truth is that we would and I just don't like to think about it Looking at New Orleans in the wake of Katrina it is believable given the actions of many of the people during those troubled timesThe story is too short a little than an hour's read But I enjoyed every bit of it It was ten times better than Cormac McCarthy's The Road But then again London was willing to use the full range of our language including a rich vocabulary names and even gasp punctuation You see Jack London understood that his job as a writer was towrite And write he did Don't miss this short book It is free at feedbooks in several ebook formats Enjoy


  5. Natalie Vellacott Natalie Vellacott says:

    Every once in a while I dip into something outside of my normal genre and in the public domain This short book caught my eye due to the other books by the authorIt is some time in the future A primitive grandfather and his two wild grandchildren are forraging for food or accurately eating crabs as this is the only food available to them A grizzly bear wanders around The picture is of remote wasteland hopelessness and destitution The grandchildren aren't really interested in the tales of their elderly relation they are akin to savages but as he insists on telling them they half heartedly listen to the storyGrandpa returns to the past when the Scarlet Plague swept the planet destroying billions of people and bringing modern civilisation to its knees He recounts the gruesome deterioration of the many as the few with some kind of immunity struggled to survive The decisions that had to be made as each person realised they had succumbed and perhaps only had minutes left to liveAlthough this account is short and simple the author does a good job in drawing the reader in I found it difficult to put down and read it through in an hour The whole premise of the story reminds us that as a race we are completely out of control We have no power to determine events and we don't know at all what will happen in the future We could easily be wiped out in a nuclear holocaust or killed off slowly as antibiotics become reistant or even as this book suggests be afflicted with a deadly plague that kills within minutes What a scary thought we think of ourselves as being so enlightened progressive and powerful but the reality is that we are totally powerless and at the mercy of the elementsIt was interesting for me that even writing from a non religious standpoint the author highlights that in times like this when people are dropping like flies it is each man for himself I did not go to the groceryman's assistance The time for such acts had already passed Civilization was crumbling and it was each for himselfWe can try to deny it but we are all inherently selfish due to indwelling sin in our heartsThere are some people scratching their heads at this point in my review Of course all of the above would be true if God was not orchestrating events It is a great relief to me as a Christian that He is in total control and that none of the things suggested even in sci fi can happen without His approval and direction We are really fragile small weak and helpless in all manner of things but God is not and He knows exactly what will happen and when How the atheist copes with the uncertainties of life and death I have no idea I'm just very thankful that I'm not in that campWorth reading if you are secure in the knowledge that it won't happen unless God wills it There is no bad language some violence which isn't especially graphic and no sexual content


  6. lark benobi lark benobi says:

    A thoroughly entertaining look from 1912 of how a viral outbreak might overcome all of human civilization It's sophisticated for its time The novel has in it a level of grotesue medical detail descriptions of the many ways people can die Writing about violent death is an overlooked skill of London's and what he writes here reminds me of the over the top portions of The Call of the Wild The novel has a prescient understanding of how highly contagious infections might propagate and how defensive measures might fail in times of crisis The story of The Scarlet Plague is framed by a post apocalyptic far in the future story where the only survivor who remembers 'before the plague' times is mocked or ignored by the young people born after the crisis they just don't care what the world used to be like One other delight for me was the way London slips now and then into a narrative style I'd almost call Poe light revealing the influence of Poe's The Masue of the Red Death on London and on his story Poe and London have very different narrative styles to say the least so these sections so obviously non London ish were somehow delightful to read


  7. Susana Susana says:

    This tale is very distant from the universe that I associate to Jack London It's a very interesting dystopia in which mankind was almost completely anihilated by a plague and the surviving population has regressed to a primitive state of civilizationI thought 60 years was a far too short a period to allow certain events to take place but in a general way I liked it specially considering it was written in 1912


  8. Carla Carla says:

    Jack London Intelligent men are cruel Stupid men are monstrously cruelJACK LONDON The Star Rover


  9. David David says:

    Did you know that Jack London wrote a post apocalyptic novel I didn'tThe Scarlet Death broke out in San Francisco The first death came on a Monday morning By Thursday they were dying like flies in Oakland and San Francisco They died everywhere—in their beds at their work walking along the street It was on Tuesday that I saw my first death—Miss Collbran one of my students sitting right there before my eyes in my lecture room I noticed her face while I was talking It had suddenly turned scarlet I ceased speaking and could only look at her for the first fear of the plague was already on all of us and we knew that it had come The young women screamed and ran out of the room So did the young men run out all but two Miss Collbran's convulsions were very mild and lasted less than a minute One of the young men fetched her a glass of water She drank only a little of it and cried out 'My feet All sensation has left them'After a minute she said 'I have no feet I am unaware that I have any feet And my knees are cold I can scarcely feel that I have knees'I was expecting a nifty adventure in the tradition of HG Wells or Edgar Rice Burroughs after reading The Call of the Wild but The Scarlet Plague written in 1912 seems to be from a later stage in Jack London's career when according to Wikipedia he was often just churning out stories to pay for upgrades on his ranch It rather shows that dialog above is hardly realistic and London's imagined plague striking in 2013 shows little imagination and his futuristic world even lessThis wasn't a bad story it just wasn't particularly exciting or original and I doubt it was very original even in 1912 There isn't much tension because it's all narrated by an old man once a Professor of English Literature at UC Berkeley telling his savage grandchildren how the plague came over 60 years earlier His incurious grandsons rudely complain and call him names whenever he uses words they're not familiar withIt is an interesting early entry in the post apocalyptic sub genre and while I could compare it to any number of later global plague novels if I had to guess which modern author was most heavily influenced by it I'd say Cormac McCarthy with his surprisingly similar and eually tedious novel The Road which like The Scarlet Plague shows little concern about the science of the disease that ended civilization or the details of the world but is centered on one survivor trying to keep the fire alive The fact that both novels end on the California coast also seems an interesting coincidenceThat said you might want to read this for historical reasons if you are into post apocalyptic novels but I don't think it was one of London's best


  10. John Anthony John Anthony says:

    This was a well hidden little gem to me at any rate It’s hard to believe that Jack London wrote this at the beginning of the last century I didn’t know that he had written this futuristic novel It is so very believable and depressingly scary His theme is the downfall of civilization as we know it following the Scarlet Plague The few survivors man and beast become feral A grandfather a rare survivor and former academic reminisces to his grandsons some appreciative than others about the old daysI was reminded of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 whilst reading this also Hemingway’s Old Man and the Sea ie relationship between grandfather and his grandson Edwin in The SP It is rather beautifully written I read it on Kindle Supposedly 310 pages long it seemed much shorter than that I gave 4 to Fahrenheit so I givethis 5 for accessibilityInteresting that the few human survivors all appear to be Aryan


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10 thoughts on “The Scarlet Plague

  1. J.L. Sutton J.L. Sutton says:

    Very interesting More familiar to readers as the author of Call of the Wild and White Fang Jack London tackles a post apocalyptic dystopia in The Scarlet Plague originally published in 1912 The story is set in 2073 in a world largely depopulated by the pandemic that uickly spread around the world from the perspective of a former English professor of UC Berkeley James Howard Smith Smith recounts the plague that occurred 60 years earlier how it infected millions and cut would be survivors off from the rest of the world Really he recounts the end of civilization San Francisco and the whole East Bay is virtually uninhabited Since modern communication is no longer functioning he assumes that's the way it is everywhere Smith is a man who recognizes the pre plague world has disappeared; he would like to pass on his knowledge to a few survivors in hopes that civilization can be rebuilt However he knows mankind will repeat the same mistakes 35 stars rounded up because I strangely like hearing about my old stomping grounds even if they've been devastated by the plague 1949 reprint of The Scarlet Plague

  2. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    The Scarlet Plague‬‬‬ Sunlanders Master of Mystry The Scarlet Plague and Before Adam Jack LondonThe Scarlet Plague is a post apocalyptic fiction novel written by Jack London and originally published in London Magazine in 1912 The story takes place in 2073 sixty years after an uncontrollable epidemic the Red Death has depopulated the planet James Smith is one of the survivors of the era before the scarlet plague hit and is still left alive in the San Francisco area and he travels with his grandsons Edwin Hoo Hoo and Hare Lip His grandsons are young and live as primeval hunter gatherers in a heavily depopulated world Their intellect is limited as are their language abilities Edwin asks Smith whom they call Granser to tell them of the disease alternately referred to as scarlet plague scarlet death or red death تاریخ نخستین خوانش سال 1972میلادیعنوان طاعون سرخ شاهکار جک لندن، نویسنده جک لندن، مترجم گیورگیس آقاسی؛ مشخصات نشر تهران، انتشارات بنگاه آرمان، 1350، در 224ص؛ چاپ دیگر تهران، نشر طلوع؛ 1370؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی سده 20معنوان طاعون ارغوانی، نویسنده جک لندن، مترجم محمد مجلسی؛ مشخصات نشر تهران، دنیای نو، 1388، در 159ص، شابک 9789641720423؛ داستان‌های پنجگانه‌ ی این کتاب «دشمن همه دنیا»، «هجوم بی مانند»، «جالوت»، «حکایت عبرت آور» و «طاعون ارغوانی» از نوشته‌ های نگارنده در واپسین سال‌های عمر، در نخستین دهه‌ ی سده ی بیستم میلادی است؛ نویسنده در این‌جا از سده‌ های آینده نیز می‌نویسند، و به سرانگشت خیال، کتاب سرنوشت بشر را ورق می‌زنند، تا صفحات ناخوانده را جلوی چشم خوانشگران خویش بگذارند؛ در باره طاعون سرخ چکیده داستان این کتاب خوانشگر را به سال 2073میلادی میبرد؛ انتظار داریم دنیایی پیشرفته و متمدن پیش روی ما باشد؛ ولی انسانهایی را میبینیم، که با امکاناتی اندک، و همچون انسانهای نخستین زندگی میکنند؛ برهان این ماجرا چیست؟ پیشرفتهایی که مردمان بگذشته به دست آورده بودند کجا رفته است؟ این موضوع را تنها، پیرمردی به نام «جیمز اسمیت»، میتواند بازگو کند؛ زمانیکه نوه هایش از ایشان این پرسش را میپرسند، داستانی از شصت سال پیشتر را روایت میکند؛ زمانیکه جهان پیشرفت بسیاری کرده، و «اسمیت» استاد یکی از مشهورترین دانشگاههای «انگلستان» بوده است؛ همه چیز به خوبی پیش میرود، تا اینکه جهان، توسط خطری مرگبار، تهدید میشود؛ طاعون سرخ ؛ طاعون سرخ رمانی کوتاه، در سبک ادبیات داستانی رستاخیزی، و پسارستاخیزی، اثر «جک لندن»، نویسنده ی نام آشنای آمریکایی است، داستان نخستین بار در سال 1912میلادی، در مجله ی «لندن» چاپ شد؛ این کتاب در ایران، با عنوان «طاعون ارغوانی» نیز، به چاپ رسیده است؛ «جک لندن» در این اثر، همچون برخی دیگر از داستانهای خویش، آینده ی جامعه را، به تصویر کشیده است؛ از این نظر، میتوان ایشان را، با نویسندگانی همچون «ژول ورن»، «جورج ولز» و یا «جان کریستوفر»، قیاس کرد؛ ولی عینک دید ایشان، تفاوت بسیاری دارد؛ نگارنده، آینده ای تیره و تار را، در قالب داستان، برای خوانشگرانش بازگو میکند؛ آینده ای که پر از مشکلات و نابرابریهاست؛ برای همین است که شماری ایشان را نویسنده ای بدبین میدانندتاریخ بهنگام رسان 05071399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا شربیانی

  3. Simona B Simona B says:

    25Some will fight some will rule some will pray; and all the rest will toil and suffer sore while on their bleeding carcasses is reared again and yet again without end the amazing beauty and surpassing wonder of the civilized statePlease take my rating with a grain of salt It is mostly due to the fact that being The Scarlet Plague the perfect epitome of the classic imagery we all have nowadays of a post apocalyptic world I felt that the book had nothing new to say to me Of course having being written in 1912 whoever read it then or even just a few decades ago must have been able to perceive it rather differently The writing style and the fact that almost the whole story is recounted as an oral narrative are the two elements capable of making the novella distinguishable to my eyes at least Bill the Chauffeur's and Vesta's episode though again not new to our ears is probably one of the most evidently thought provoking parts of the story and the only on which my mind actually dwelt a bit longer Also the author's and the old man's reflections on language can be counted among the interesting bits The one conclusion I can draw out of this is that my beloved London has written far better things

  4. Jason Reeser Jason Reeser says:

    I had trouble reading this and believing that Jack London wrote this one hundred years ago I kept expecting to discover this was a different Jack London one who wrote in the late 1950s or 1960s This was far too evolved to be something written by a man in 1912 However it supposedly is Jack London it really is but I can't seem to rid myself of the doubt So with that in mindWow this story is perfectly told A tight fun read about the end of civilization London's futuristic view of the world is pretty amazing He predicts that in 2013 there would be 8 billion people Today's world population is 7175 billion Considering the number of people who died in the wars from last century I'd say London had it right Or as my daughter suggested someone helped him with him math A plague hits the world in 2013 and reduces the population down to under one thousand people scattered throughout the world The story of the plague is only told as a memory since London's story follows an old man the last survivor of the apocalypse as he tells his grandchildren about the fall of civilizationThe grandchildren are basically savages having been raised with little knowledge of the previous world It is my only complaint about the book I do think we would regress a bit if this happened but I don't think it would happen so uickly Maybe the truth is that we would and I just don't like to think about it Looking at New Orleans in the wake of Katrina it is believable given the actions of many of the people during those troubled timesThe story is too short a little than an hour's read But I enjoyed every bit of it It was ten times better than Cormac McCarthy's The Road But then again London was willing to use the full range of our language including a rich vocabulary names and even gasp punctuation You see Jack London understood that his job as a writer was towrite And write he did Don't miss this short book It is free at feedbooks in several ebook formats Enjoy

  5. Natalie Vellacott Natalie Vellacott says:

    Every once in a while I dip into something outside of my normal genre and in the public domain This short book caught my eye due to the other books by the authorIt is some time in the future A primitive grandfather and his two wild grandchildren are forraging for food or accurately eating crabs as this is the only food available to them A grizzly bear wanders around The picture is of remote wasteland hopelessness and destitution The grandchildren aren't really interested in the tales of their elderly relation they are akin to savages but as he insists on telling them they half heartedly listen to the storyGrandpa returns to the past when the Scarlet Plague swept the planet destroying billions of people and bringing modern civilisation to its knees He recounts the gruesome deterioration of the many as the few with some kind of immunity struggled to survive The decisions that had to be made as each person realised they had succumbed and perhaps only had minutes left to liveAlthough this account is short and simple the author does a good job in drawing the reader in I found it difficult to put down and read it through in an hour The whole premise of the story reminds us that as a race we are completely out of control We have no power to determine events and we don't know at all what will happen in the future We could easily be wiped out in a nuclear holocaust or killed off slowly as antibiotics become reistant or even as this book suggests be afflicted with a deadly plague that kills within minutes What a scary thought we think of ourselves as being so enlightened progressive and powerful but the reality is that we are totally powerless and at the mercy of the elementsIt was interesting for me that even writing from a non religious standpoint the author highlights that in times like this when people are dropping like flies it is each man for himself I did not go to the groceryman's assistance The time for such acts had already passed Civilization was crumbling and it was each for himselfWe can try to deny it but we are all inherently selfish due to indwelling sin in our heartsThere are some people scratching their heads at this point in my review Of course all of the above would be true if God was not orchestrating events It is a great relief to me as a Christian that He is in total control and that none of the things suggested even in sci fi can happen without His approval and direction We are really fragile small weak and helpless in all manner of things but God is not and He knows exactly what will happen and when How the atheist copes with the uncertainties of life and death I have no idea I'm just very thankful that I'm not in that campWorth reading if you are secure in the knowledge that it won't happen unless God wills it There is no bad language some violence which isn't especially graphic and no sexual content

  6. lark benobi lark benobi says:

    A thoroughly entertaining look from 1912 of how a viral outbreak might overcome all of human civilization It's sophisticated for its time The novel has in it a level of grotesue medical detail descriptions of the many ways people can die Writing about violent death is an overlooked skill of London's and what he writes here reminds me of the over the top portions of The Call of the Wild The novel has a prescient understanding of how highly contagious infections might propagate and how defensive measures might fail in times of crisis The story of The Scarlet Plague is framed by a post apocalyptic far in the future story where the only survivor who remembers 'before the plague' times is mocked or ignored by the young people born after the crisis they just don't care what the world used to be like One other delight for me was the way London slips now and then into a narrative style I'd almost call Poe light revealing the influence of Poe's The Masue of the Red Death on London and on his story Poe and London have very different narrative styles to say the least so these sections so obviously non London ish were somehow delightful to read

  7. Susana Susana says:

    This tale is very distant from the universe that I associate to Jack London It's a very interesting dystopia in which mankind was almost completely anihilated by a plague and the surviving population has regressed to a primitive state of civilizationI thought 60 years was a far too short a period to allow certain events to take place but in a general way I liked it specially considering it was written in 1912

  8. Carla Carla says:

    Jack London Intelligent men are cruel Stupid men are monstrously cruelJACK LONDON The Star Rover

  9. David David says:

    Did you know that Jack London wrote a post apocalyptic novel I didn'tThe Scarlet Death broke out in San Francisco The first death came on a Monday morning By Thursday they were dying like flies in Oakland and San Francisco They died everywhere—in their beds at their work walking along the street It was on Tuesday that I saw my first death—Miss Collbran one of my students sitting right there before my eyes in my lecture room I noticed her face while I was talking It had suddenly turned scarlet I ceased speaking and could only look at her for the first fear of the plague was already on all of us and we knew that it had come The young women screamed and ran out of the room So did the young men run out all but two Miss Collbran's convulsions were very mild and lasted less than a minute One of the young men fetched her a glass of water She drank only a little of it and cried out 'My feet All sensation has left them'After a minute she said 'I have no feet I am unaware that I have any feet And my knees are cold I can scarcely feel that I have knees'I was expecting a nifty adventure in the tradition of HG Wells or Edgar Rice Burroughs after reading The Call of the Wild but The Scarlet Plague written in 1912 seems to be from a later stage in Jack London's career when according to Wikipedia he was often just churning out stories to pay for upgrades on his ranch It rather shows that dialog above is hardly realistic and London's imagined plague striking in 2013 shows little imagination and his futuristic world even lessThis wasn't a bad story it just wasn't particularly exciting or original and I doubt it was very original even in 1912 There isn't much tension because it's all narrated by an old man once a Professor of English Literature at UC Berkeley telling his savage grandchildren how the plague came over 60 years earlier His incurious grandsons rudely complain and call him names whenever he uses words they're not familiar withIt is an interesting early entry in the post apocalyptic sub genre and while I could compare it to any number of later global plague novels if I had to guess which modern author was most heavily influenced by it I'd say Cormac McCarthy with his surprisingly similar and eually tedious novel The Road which like The Scarlet Plague shows little concern about the science of the disease that ended civilization or the details of the world but is centered on one survivor trying to keep the fire alive The fact that both novels end on the California coast also seems an interesting coincidenceThat said you might want to read this for historical reasons if you are into post apocalyptic novels but I don't think it was one of London's best

  10. John Anthony John Anthony says:

    This was a well hidden little gem to me at any rate It’s hard to believe that Jack London wrote this at the beginning of the last century I didn’t know that he had written this futuristic novel It is so very believable and depressingly scary His theme is the downfall of civilization as we know it following the Scarlet Plague The few survivors man and beast become feral A grandfather a rare survivor and former academic reminisces to his grandsons some appreciative than others about the old daysI was reminded of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 whilst reading this also Hemingway’s Old Man and the Sea ie relationship between grandfather and his grandson Edwin in The SP It is rather beautifully written I read it on Kindle Supposedly 310 pages long it seemed much shorter than that I gave 4 to Fahrenheit so I givethis 5 for accessibilityInteresting that the few human survivors all appear to be Aryan

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