Fault Lines PDF/EPUB Þ Paperback

Fault Lines PDF/EPUB Þ Paperback

Fault Lines ➳ [Reading] ➶ Fault Lines By David Pryce-Jones ➩ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Born in Vienna in 1936 David Pryce Jones is the son of the well known writer and editor of the Times Literary Supplement Alan Pryce Jones and Therese “Poppy” Fould Springer He grew up in a cosmopo Born in Vienna in David Pryce Jones is the son of the well known writer and editor of the Times Literary Supplement Alan Pryce Jones and Therese “Poppy” Fould Springer He grew up in a cosmopolitan mix of industrialists bankers soldiers and playboys on both sides of a family embodying the Fault Lines of the title “not uite Jewish and not uite Christian not uite Austrian and not uite French or English not uite heterosexual and not uite homosexual socially conventional but not uite secure” Graduating from Magdalen College Oxford David Pryce Jones served as Literary Editor of the Financial Times and the Spectator a war correspondent for the Daily Telegraph and Senior Editor of National Review Fault Lines — a memoir that spans Europe America and the Middle East and encompasses figures ranging from Somerset Maugham to Svetlana Stalin to Elie de Rothschild — has the storytelling power of Pryce Jones’s numerous novels and non fiction books and is perceptive and poignant testimony to the fortunes and misfortunes of the present age.


5 thoughts on “Fault Lines

  1. Jill Meyer Jill Meyer says:

    Noted British author and journalist David Pryce Jones has written a memoir unlike almost any other memoir I've ever read Maybe that because he has lived a life unlike most others Fault Lines originally published in 2016 is the story of two families and the son produced by those familiesDavid Pryce Jones spends much of the book talking about his ancestors The Pryce Jones family was Christian and thoroughly English and Welsh His mother's family the Fould Springers were Austrian French nominally Jewish and fairly neurotic They had intermarried with the Rothschild and owned several grand houses in Austria France and Hungary They were high livers; money seemed to come from their many investments David's mother was one of four children of Mitzi Fould who ran her family with an iron fist No marriages took place without her approval though she married two men who were bisexual as was David's fatherThe Fault Lines of Pryce Jones life ran along religious economic and sexual lines His mother's family were Jewish by birth but most seemed to flee their faith by intermarriage Of course we're talking about Europe in the first half of the 20th century when being Jewish was often a cause for worry about their very lives Pryce Jones writes about members of the family and others associated with them who were murdered in the campsPryce Jones' writes about being trapped in France after the Phoney War was replaced by the German sweep through the Low Lands and France He was tended to by his nanny; his parents were in other places safer places Somehow young David and the nanny make it out of Vichy France with the help from others The rest of his life seems to be one of relative normality compared to what and who had came before I'm glad I was reading the eversion of Pryce Jones' memoir because I kept flipping between Wikipedia and my Kindle app His book is a juicy and fun read if you're even somewhat familiar with the times


  2. Josef Josef says:

    A sometimes maddeningly paced but overall melancholy memoir and family dynasty biography D Pryce Jones' opus is historically relevant and surprisingly full of backroom insights into the motivations and private atmospheres of some famous and infamous historical figures of the last century Some of the odd pacing comes in the form of the reader getting so many names dropped on them from the pied de terre set of 20th century Europe that sometimes one wishes a bit editing was brought to bear; a sensation not unlike being invited to one of those awful LA parties with a guide where all one remembers the next morning is the guides' fingers pointing at celebrities without ever having actually met one That aside Fault Lines is overall fascinating reading about a wealthy family of Ashkenazi origin that used money and worldly nobility prestige as its main tool to willfully try to forget or perhaps reinterpret its irrevocable Jewish heritage It's not an uncommon theme played out in so many ways consciously or unconsciously by many fault lines flowing out of that diaspora but this tale in particular makes for an interesting sometimes deeply affecting and painful playing out of that themeSome professional reviews I think made it seem like David's book was merely about settling scores between himself and members of his family as well as various literary or political adversaries While there are some passages that do indeed read as if David is stoking his own fires I give him the benefit of the doubt here for the sake of wanting to understand where the author is coming from What I found was that unlike the majority of most current works dealing with one or aspects of history of the twentieth century this one comes from a source who not only lived it but did so precisely from the best vantage points to observe at least some of the causative springs to what most was at best mere headline copy From his experience with the postwar realities throughout Europe the Soviet Union to the Middle East in the aftermath of the Six Day War to the American protest movement at Berkeley and having to deal with an Allen Ginsberg at his most glorified David adds flesh bone and in some places blood and tears to what most of us in the current Western educational mileu get the frothiest of froth when it comes to insight or context onEven though he does a good job of reminiscing on his own personal life with him and his own family it does seem a bit lamentable that his own life and reflections on that are fleshed out in the first prologue ish chapter and perhaps by some of the reviewers of his book than the actual book itself It's obvious that this was not that book While some might balk at the almost journalistically detached way that he writes of his father's last days especially in comparison to the sentimentality one finds in a lot of trendier memoirs this actually made the late Alan Pryce Jones' passing feel poignant to me This forgoing of sentimentality actually gave me a deeper insight to not only his son's inner experience but maybe Alan's as well Maybe that's just meThere are uite a few insightful uotes I could pick out but I think this one hit this reader with particular force It comes from his time in the Middle East as correspondent for The Telegraph? during his tour of a military museum in Cairo where the disastrous for the UAREgypt Jordan and Syria 1967 war against Israel was being commemorated propaganda style in amazing incongruity to the actual reality of the outcome ie Israel having won the ill advised campaign decisively I found the uote apt and especially relevant to the current geo political realities still present in the Middle East and other areas as well as to the groupthink neurosis's all the rage in America“In their culture the dread of shame is so strong that it enforces denial of reality Mistakes are inadmissible and repetition therefore takes the place of correction”


  3. Carol Carol says:

    Too much name dropping Hard to read for all the famous people that he had contact with


  4. E E says:

    Coming from a very rich and well connected European Jewish family David Pryce Jones has met just anyone with English literary credibility over the last 60 years his father was editor of the Times Literary Supplement And being Jewish he has harrowing tales of narrowly escaping the Holocaust as well he was born in 1936 This his memoir is easy to read perhaps lighter than one might think considering the topics just mentioned not to mention his father's odd sexuality his uncle's abusiveness his daughter's early death his mother's mental instability and son And yet it is riveting It would be easy to accuse him of name dropping or being blinded by privilege but he avoids those charges by being honest and humbleHis most famous works address the instability of the Arab world and the infamous Nazi loving Unity Mitford of the obnoxious Mitford sisters I would have appreciated hearing on these issues but I guess I should just read the original works


  5. Olga Vannucci Olga Vannucci says:

    Of English and Welsh heritage and French and Austrian tooHe pilfered food in Vichy during World War IIHis life experience colored the writer he'd becomeAnd in the process he met nearly everyone


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5 thoughts on “Fault Lines

  1. Jill Meyer Jill Meyer says:

    Noted British author and journalist David Pryce Jones has written a memoir unlike almost any other memoir I've ever read Maybe that because he has lived a life unlike most others Fault Lines originally published in 2016 is the story of two families and the son produced by those familiesDavid Pryce Jones spends much of the book talking about his ancestors The Pryce Jones family was Christian and thoroughly English and Welsh His mother's family the Fould Springers were Austrian French nominally Jewish and fairly neurotic They had intermarried with the Rothschild and owned several grand houses in Austria France and Hungary They were high livers; money seemed to come from their many investments David's mother was one of four children of Mitzi Fould who ran her family with an iron fist No marriages took place without her approval though she married two men who were bisexual as was David's fatherThe Fault Lines of Pryce Jones life ran along religious economic and sexual lines His mother's family were Jewish by birth but most seemed to flee their faith by intermarriage Of course we're talking about Europe in the first half of the 20th century when being Jewish was often a cause for worry about their very lives Pryce Jones writes about members of the family and others associated with them who were murdered in the campsPryce Jones' writes about being trapped in France after the Phoney War was replaced by the German sweep through the Low Lands and France He was tended to by his nanny; his parents were in other places safer places Somehow young David and the nanny make it out of Vichy France with the help from others The rest of his life seems to be one of relative normality compared to what and who had came before I'm glad I was reading the eversion of Pryce Jones' memoir because I kept flipping between Wikipedia and my Kindle app His book is a juicy and fun read if you're even somewhat familiar with the times

  2. Josef Josef says:

    A sometimes maddeningly paced but overall melancholy memoir and family dynasty biography D Pryce Jones' opus is historically relevant and surprisingly full of backroom insights into the motivations and private atmospheres of some famous and infamous historical figures of the last century Some of the odd pacing comes in the form of the reader getting so many names dropped on them from the pied de terre set of 20th century Europe that sometimes one wishes a bit editing was brought to bear; a sensation not unlike being invited to one of those awful LA parties with a guide where all one remembers the next morning is the guides' fingers pointing at celebrities without ever having actually met one That aside Fault Lines is overall fascinating reading about a wealthy family of Ashkenazi origin that used money and worldly nobility prestige as its main tool to willfully try to forget or perhaps reinterpret its irrevocable Jewish heritage It's not an uncommon theme played out in so many ways consciously or unconsciously by many fault lines flowing out of that diaspora but this tale in particular makes for an interesting sometimes deeply affecting and painful playing out of that themeSome professional reviews I think made it seem like David's book was merely about settling scores between himself and members of his family as well as various literary or political adversaries While there are some passages that do indeed read as if David is stoking his own fires I give him the benefit of the doubt here for the sake of wanting to understand where the author is coming from What I found was that unlike the majority of most current works dealing with one or aspects of history of the twentieth century this one comes from a source who not only lived it but did so precisely from the best vantage points to observe at least some of the causative springs to what most was at best mere headline copy From his experience with the postwar realities throughout Europe the Soviet Union to the Middle East in the aftermath of the Six Day War to the American protest movement at Berkeley and having to deal with an Allen Ginsberg at his most glorified David adds flesh bone and in some places blood and tears to what most of us in the current Western educational mileu get the frothiest of froth when it comes to insight or context onEven though he does a good job of reminiscing on his own personal life with him and his own family it does seem a bit lamentable that his own life and reflections on that are fleshed out in the first prologue ish chapter and perhaps by some of the reviewers of his book than the actual book itself It's obvious that this was not that book While some might balk at the almost journalistically detached way that he writes of his father's last days especially in comparison to the sentimentality one finds in a lot of trendier memoirs this actually made the late Alan Pryce Jones' passing feel poignant to me This forgoing of sentimentality actually gave me a deeper insight to not only his son's inner experience but maybe Alan's as well Maybe that's just meThere are uite a few insightful uotes I could pick out but I think this one hit this reader with particular force It comes from his time in the Middle East as correspondent for The Telegraph? during his tour of a military museum in Cairo where the disastrous for the UAREgypt Jordan and Syria 1967 war against Israel was being commemorated propaganda style in amazing incongruity to the actual reality of the outcome ie Israel having won the ill advised campaign decisively I found the uote apt and especially relevant to the current geo political realities still present in the Middle East and other areas as well as to the groupthink neurosis's all the rage in America“In their culture the dread of shame is so strong that it enforces denial of reality Mistakes are inadmissible and repetition therefore takes the place of correction”

  3. Carol Carol says:

    Too much name dropping Hard to read for all the famous people that he had contact with

  4. E E says:

    Coming from a very rich and well connected European Jewish family David Pryce Jones has met just anyone with English literary credibility over the last 60 years his father was editor of the Times Literary Supplement And being Jewish he has harrowing tales of narrowly escaping the Holocaust as well he was born in 1936 This his memoir is easy to read perhaps lighter than one might think considering the topics just mentioned not to mention his father's odd sexuality his uncle's abusiveness his daughter's early death his mother's mental instability and son And yet it is riveting It would be easy to accuse him of name dropping or being blinded by privilege but he avoids those charges by being honest and humbleHis most famous works address the instability of the Arab world and the infamous Nazi loving Unity Mitford of the obnoxious Mitford sisters I would have appreciated hearing on these issues but I guess I should just read the original works

  5. Olga Vannucci Olga Vannucci says:

    Of English and Welsh heritage and French and Austrian tooHe pilfered food in Vichy during World War IIHis life experience colored the writer he'd becomeAnd in the process he met nearly everyone

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