Forgotten Bones. Uncovering a Slave Cemetery PDF ☆

Forgotten Bones. Uncovering a Slave Cemetery PDF ☆


10 thoughts on “Forgotten Bones. Uncovering a Slave Cemetery

  1. Sesana Sesana says:

    There's an incredible amount of very fascinating information crammed into just barely than 50 pages It doesn't just cover the excavation of the cemetery that's the main focus of the book which I was interested to learn was on the property of Alexander Hamilton's father in law though the book never makes that connection It also goes over what this cemetery and others like it in the North have revealed about slavery in northern states


  2. Reading Reindeer Emigrates To Pluto Reading Reindeer Emigrates To Pluto says:

    REVIEW FORGOTTEN BONES UNCOVERING A SLAVE CEMETERY by Lois Miner HueyWhat a wonderfully engrossing book detailing the discovery excavation and subseuent museum lab work of an overlooked slave cemetery in Albany New York only the third such unearthed in the North Author Lois Miner Huey carefully lays out the timeline from first appearance of a skull right along through the archeological work and processing in the lab But she doesn't stop with that the history of slavery is recounted and the earlier two Northern excavations are related The discovery of these graves of slaves on the land that was once the farmholding of New York State's illustrious Schuyler family adds important information to US Colonial history


  3. Lynn Lynn says:

    Slaves in the 'north'? This book will bring this fact to the attention of many who thought slavery only existed in the 'south' Clear clean writing explains it and how we learn about itPhotos diagrams and backmatter add to the knowledge baseThe background of each page represents graph paper an important tool used by archaeologists This book will not only expand youngsters' knowledge base but may get them interested in archaeology


  4. Lynn Lynn says:

    Fascinating Story of an Archeologist Studying a African American Graveyard on Schuyler Farm Albany NYThe archeologist author tells her story of excavating an African American graveyard encountered by workers developing an area It turned out to be a slave graveyard owned by the Schuyler Farm made famous in a book by a Scottish woman who stayed with the Schuyler family as a child and wrote a book about her experience years later The archeologists working on the cemetery carefully excavated the site did scientific research on them and made reconstructions of their faces The people were then reburied elsewhere The research was compared with similar excavations in New York City and Portsmouth NH Great information and kids w Will be fascinated with the book


  5. Cheryl Cheryl says:

    I always love when a book gets you to thinking about things you hadn't really considered We always associate American slavery to have been in the south but in this case I'd say the main focus was to remind you that slavery did exist in the northern states as wellAside from that the book also had some fun tidbits on how archaeological finds are extracted and studied It felt fairly complete I wanted to rate this as a 3 star but I know that if I had read this as a physical book instead of an ebook the impact would've been as intended 4 stars it is


  6. Shelley Shelley says:

    A construction crew near Albany NY was digging up the street and found a skull leading to the discovery of Philip Schuyler's slaves' cemetery This is an absolutely fascinating look at how the bioarchaelogists do their job with the bones how they put together their lives and what their burials mean They also explained how their faces could be reconstructed and showed what they looked like It was written in a very straightforward way with a ton of information and it gave details on the other two Northern slave cemeteries that have been found in New Hampshire and NYC and how the bodies and lives of everyone buried in all three were the same and how they differed There was an amazing amount of info packed in and in a very accessible wayI also appreciated how straightforward the language was Whites banned this slave owners did that slaves stayed up longer than their enslavers etc


  7. Deborah Deborah says:

    Forgotten Bones Uncovering a Slave Cemetery is a fascinating look at the process of archaeology anthropology bioarchiology forensic anthropology facial reconstruction and a treasure trove of history concerning slavery in the north Middle graders will warm to the opening story how construction workers accidentally discovered a skull Police CSI and archaeologists appear at the scene and soon estimate the bone's age at 100 or years Stains indicated the site might contain additional graves Had it been a cemetery? Historical research turned up documents such as deeds and maps which showed a Schuyler family had owned that patch of ground They had also owned slaves Could it be a slave cemetery? That would make it only the third such cemetery discovered in the North an amazing source historyThus begins the slow and careful steps to excavate the graves The author intersperses bits of history about the era and slavery throughout the scientific protocols presenting photographs of primary sources along the way The narrative language makes the complicated procedures easy to understandGreat for a student interested in history or science and enjoys a bit of gross


  8. Angie Angie says:

    Construction workers discovered a forgotten slave cemetery on what was once the Schuyler Farm in Albany New York Archeologists discovered the graves of 14 slaves from the 18th century From the bones they were able to find out the ages sex diet and place of origin They were even able to reconstruct what the people might have looked like Most people don't think about slavery in the North It did exist but it a different way than the South Author Lois Miner Huey does a great job talking about slave life in the North from research conducted on the three slave cemeteries found there She compares the life of a slave to that of a white person at the same time This is a very informative text that history and archeology buffs will enjoy I received a copy of the book from Netgalley


  9. Jason Jason says:

    Jam packed with lots of interesting facts about archaeology and slave life in the north in the 18th century


  10. SCAPOD SCAPOD says:

    The book Forgotten Bones Uncovering a Slave Cemetery is a children’s non fiction book intended for grades 4 8 about the discovery of a slave cemetery in 2005 During the course of a construction project laying sewer lines near Albany New York workers uncovered a skull When it was determined the skull was not from a recent death archaeologists began investigating the site Excavations and research revealed it was a small slave cemetery associated with the Schuyler family prior to the 1800s The book follows the investigation process through initial excavations research analysis reconstruction of lifestyle and comparison to other northern slave cemeteries Overall I think this book did a wonderful job of presenting the bioarchaeological process in a clear and engaging manner The images used were sharp and complimented the text well I especially liked the photos of primary documents used in the historical research such as list of farm holdings on page as well as archaeological documentation multiple sketches of the skeletons in situ The details about those who were buried in the cemetery such as the wear on their teeth revealing how one smoked a pipe and another worked as a seamstress holding the thread in her mouth helped bring these people back to life Giving the enslaved individuals a story how they lived worked played and ate helps students relate to the past and see that people were than just statistics or facts in a history book The comparison at the end of the Schuyler cemetery to slave cemeteries in New York city and Portsmouth did a good job of highlighting that excavations are not isolated events It is important to compare the information gathered at one site to others of a similar time or subject matter to get a better view of the entire picture I would have liked to see some of the basic archaeological information a little clearly defined The tools being used in the excavations were listed but not how they were used What was the archaeologist using the screen for in the picture? The drawings of the skeletons were featured but why was it so important for archaeologists to take so many notes and drawings? Though it may sometimes seem obvious the emphasis that once a site is dug it cannot be put back and that information is forever lost if not documented properly is an important point to make Although there was a glossary at the end of the book I think it would have been helpful to define a few key words such as “artifact” within the text or have them in bold or italics so readers knew they could find the definition in the glossary I was also a little disappointed about the lack of information about local reaction to the discovery When the slave cemetery was discovered in New York City it became a big part of the community culture in that area Were there any potential descendents of those buried in the cemetery still living nearby? What were people’s reaction to this archaeological discovery in their community? This book is a great resource for those teaching or learning about slavery in the United States The information given through the analysis of the skeletons as well as the background research presented in the sidebars would well compliment a class discussion It also offers a uniue perspective not only of enslaved individuals in the north but also because of the size of the Schuyler cemetery allows for the stories of individuals to be told Erik


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Forgotten Bones. Uncovering a Slave Cemetery ➾ [Download] ➾ Forgotten Bones. Uncovering a Slave Cemetery By Lois Miner Huey ➳ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Imagine you're watching a backhoe dig up the ground for a construction project when a round object rolls down a pile of dirt and stops at your feet You pick it up brush off some dirt and realize you'r Imagine you're watching a backhoe Uncovering a PDF ´ dig up the ground for a construction project when a round object rolls down a pile of dirt and stops at your feet You pick it up brush off some dirt and realize you're holding a skull This is exactly what happened in Albany New York in Workers were putting in new sewer line when a backhoe driver dug up a skull After police declared Forgotten Bones. PDF or the skull wasn't connected to any recent crimes a team of archaeologists took a closer look They determined the skull was from an African American who had died than one hundred years earlier Suddenly the construction site turned into an archaeological dig Scientists excavated bones and realized that they had located a long lost slave cemetery Slavery had been legal in the northern United States including in New York State in colonial Bones. Uncovering a Kindle ´ times but the stories of these slaves are largely unknown This site became just the third slave cemetery ever to be excavated in the North See how archaeologists pieced together the truth about these once forgotten bones.

  • Hardcover
  • 56 pages
  • Forgotten Bones. Uncovering a Slave Cemetery
  • Lois Miner Huey
  • English
  • 23 February 2016
  • 9781467733939

10 thoughts on “Forgotten Bones. Uncovering a Slave Cemetery

  1. Sesana Sesana says:

    There's an incredible amount of very fascinating information crammed into just barely than 50 pages It doesn't just cover the excavation of the cemetery that's the main focus of the book which I was interested to learn was on the property of Alexander Hamilton's father in law though the book never makes that connection It also goes over what this cemetery and others like it in the North have revealed about slavery in northern states

  2. Reading Reindeer Emigrates To Pluto Reading Reindeer Emigrates To Pluto says:

    REVIEW FORGOTTEN BONES UNCOVERING A SLAVE CEMETERY by Lois Miner HueyWhat a wonderfully engrossing book detailing the discovery excavation and subseuent museum lab work of an overlooked slave cemetery in Albany New York only the third such unearthed in the North Author Lois Miner Huey carefully lays out the timeline from first appearance of a skull right along through the archeological work and processing in the lab But she doesn't stop with that the history of slavery is recounted and the earlier two Northern excavations are related The discovery of these graves of slaves on the land that was once the farmholding of New York State's illustrious Schuyler family adds important information to US Colonial history

  3. Lynn Lynn says:

    Slaves in the 'north'? This book will bring this fact to the attention of many who thought slavery only existed in the 'south' Clear clean writing explains it and how we learn about itPhotos diagrams and backmatter add to the knowledge baseThe background of each page represents graph paper an important tool used by archaeologists This book will not only expand youngsters' knowledge base but may get them interested in archaeology

  4. Lynn Lynn says:

    Fascinating Story of an Archeologist Studying a African American Graveyard on Schuyler Farm Albany NYThe archeologist author tells her story of excavating an African American graveyard encountered by workers developing an area It turned out to be a slave graveyard owned by the Schuyler Farm made famous in a book by a Scottish woman who stayed with the Schuyler family as a child and wrote a book about her experience years later The archeologists working on the cemetery carefully excavated the site did scientific research on them and made reconstructions of their faces The people were then reburied elsewhere The research was compared with similar excavations in New York City and Portsmouth NH Great information and kids w Will be fascinated with the book

  5. Cheryl Cheryl says:

    I always love when a book gets you to thinking about things you hadn't really considered We always associate American slavery to have been in the south but in this case I'd say the main focus was to remind you that slavery did exist in the northern states as wellAside from that the book also had some fun tidbits on how archaeological finds are extracted and studied It felt fairly complete I wanted to rate this as a 3 star but I know that if I had read this as a physical book instead of an ebook the impact would've been as intended 4 stars it is

  6. Shelley Shelley says:

    A construction crew near Albany NY was digging up the street and found a skull leading to the discovery of Philip Schuyler's slaves' cemetery This is an absolutely fascinating look at how the bioarchaelogists do their job with the bones how they put together their lives and what their burials mean They also explained how their faces could be reconstructed and showed what they looked like It was written in a very straightforward way with a ton of information and it gave details on the other two Northern slave cemeteries that have been found in New Hampshire and NYC and how the bodies and lives of everyone buried in all three were the same and how they differed There was an amazing amount of info packed in and in a very accessible wayI also appreciated how straightforward the language was Whites banned this slave owners did that slaves stayed up longer than their enslavers etc

  7. Deborah Deborah says:

    Forgotten Bones Uncovering a Slave Cemetery is a fascinating look at the process of archaeology anthropology bioarchiology forensic anthropology facial reconstruction and a treasure trove of history concerning slavery in the north Middle graders will warm to the opening story how construction workers accidentally discovered a skull Police CSI and archaeologists appear at the scene and soon estimate the bone's age at 100 or years Stains indicated the site might contain additional graves Had it been a cemetery? Historical research turned up documents such as deeds and maps which showed a Schuyler family had owned that patch of ground They had also owned slaves Could it be a slave cemetery? That would make it only the third such cemetery discovered in the North an amazing source historyThus begins the slow and careful steps to excavate the graves The author intersperses bits of history about the era and slavery throughout the scientific protocols presenting photographs of primary sources along the way The narrative language makes the complicated procedures easy to understandGreat for a student interested in history or science and enjoys a bit of gross

  8. Angie Angie says:

    Construction workers discovered a forgotten slave cemetery on what was once the Schuyler Farm in Albany New York Archeologists discovered the graves of 14 slaves from the 18th century From the bones they were able to find out the ages sex diet and place of origin They were even able to reconstruct what the people might have looked like Most people don't think about slavery in the North It did exist but it a different way than the South Author Lois Miner Huey does a great job talking about slave life in the North from research conducted on the three slave cemeteries found there She compares the life of a slave to that of a white person at the same time This is a very informative text that history and archeology buffs will enjoy I received a copy of the book from Netgalley

  9. Jason Jason says:

    Jam packed with lots of interesting facts about archaeology and slave life in the north in the 18th century

  10. SCAPOD SCAPOD says:

    The book Forgotten Bones Uncovering a Slave Cemetery is a children’s non fiction book intended for grades 4 8 about the discovery of a slave cemetery in 2005 During the course of a construction project laying sewer lines near Albany New York workers uncovered a skull When it was determined the skull was not from a recent death archaeologists began investigating the site Excavations and research revealed it was a small slave cemetery associated with the Schuyler family prior to the 1800s The book follows the investigation process through initial excavations research analysis reconstruction of lifestyle and comparison to other northern slave cemeteries Overall I think this book did a wonderful job of presenting the bioarchaeological process in a clear and engaging manner The images used were sharp and complimented the text well I especially liked the photos of primary documents used in the historical research such as list of farm holdings on page as well as archaeological documentation multiple sketches of the skeletons in situ The details about those who were buried in the cemetery such as the wear on their teeth revealing how one smoked a pipe and another worked as a seamstress holding the thread in her mouth helped bring these people back to life Giving the enslaved individuals a story how they lived worked played and ate helps students relate to the past and see that people were than just statistics or facts in a history book The comparison at the end of the Schuyler cemetery to slave cemeteries in New York city and Portsmouth did a good job of highlighting that excavations are not isolated events It is important to compare the information gathered at one site to others of a similar time or subject matter to get a better view of the entire picture I would have liked to see some of the basic archaeological information a little clearly defined The tools being used in the excavations were listed but not how they were used What was the archaeologist using the screen for in the picture? The drawings of the skeletons were featured but why was it so important for archaeologists to take so many notes and drawings? Though it may sometimes seem obvious the emphasis that once a site is dug it cannot be put back and that information is forever lost if not documented properly is an important point to make Although there was a glossary at the end of the book I think it would have been helpful to define a few key words such as “artifact” within the text or have them in bold or italics so readers knew they could find the definition in the glossary I was also a little disappointed about the lack of information about local reaction to the discovery When the slave cemetery was discovered in New York City it became a big part of the community culture in that area Were there any potential descendents of those buried in the cemetery still living nearby? What were people’s reaction to this archaeological discovery in their community? This book is a great resource for those teaching or learning about slavery in the United States The information given through the analysis of the skeletons as well as the background research presented in the sidebars would well compliment a class discussion It also offers a uniue perspective not only of enslaved individuals in the north but also because of the size of the Schuyler cemetery allows for the stories of individuals to be told Erik

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