This Space of Writing PDF ´ This Space eBook ´

This Space of Writing PDF ´ This Space eBook ´

This Space of Writing ❄ [EPUB] ✼ This Space of Writing By Stephen Mitchelmore ➝ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk What does 'literature' mean in our time While names like Proust Kafka and Woolf still stand for something what that something actually is has become obscured by the claims of commerce and journalism P What does 'literature' mean in our time While names like Proust Kafka and Woolf still stand for something what that something actually is has become obscured by the claims of commerce and journalism Perhaps a new form of attention is reuired Stephen Mitchel began writing online in and became Britain's first book blogger soon after developing the form so that it can respond in kind to the singular space opened by writing Across essays he discusses among many others the novels of Richard Ford Jeanette Winterson and Karl Ove This Space eBook ´ Knausgaard the significance for modern writers of cave paintings and the moai of Easter Island and the enduring fallacy of 'Reality Hunger' all the while maintaining a focus on the strange nature of literary space By listening to the echoes and resonances of writing this book enables a uniue encounter with literature that many critics habitually ignore With an introduction by the acclaimed novelist Lars Iyer This Space of Writing offers a renewed appreciation of the mystery and promise of writing.


12 thoughts on “This Space of Writing

  1. Jeff Bursey Jeff Bursey says:

    Longer review to come but for now this is an essential book for those whose tastes include Josipovici Blanchot Knausgaard Bernard Beckett Kafka you get the general drift While not every essay is at top level this could be said about anyone most contain interesting analyses comments challenges to critical orthodoxy and a persuasive knowledge about writing from Europe especially Highly recommendedLonger review here


  2. Whispering Stories Whispering Stories says:

    This Space of Writing is 280 pages of Stephen Mitchel’s thought provoking insights into how and why we read and write We follow as he explores the work of acclaimed writers – including Proust Kafka and Beckett no less – and digs deep into the processes of writingWho is Stephen Mitchel He’s widely known as Britain’s first ‘book blogger’ having begun writing online in 1996 This collection of reviews thoughts along with snippets about his life are the culmination of his 20 year online presence and of course his genuine love of reading which dates back even furtherFirstly I’m in awe of his dedication to book blogging This collection of reviews really celebrates this form but his reviews go beyond the face of the text We start with an appreciation of the ‘Frank Bascombe’ novels by Richard Ford However this is where like a few of the texts mentioned in the review I haven’t actually read what is being discussed Admittedly this does become a source of slight frustration but Mitchel writes in an inclusive style that allows his reader to take something away from his reviews without fully knowing the texts or authors he discusses In this instance then I found it fascinating how Mitchel writes about Bascombe’s the character writing rather than Ford’s It’s another way of delving deeper into the text itselfMitchel later muses ‘There is undoubtable pleasure in beginning to read the story of another’s life’ I couldn’t agree Not only is reading a form of escapism but there are didactic elements the opportunity to learn about a culture society historical event particular person etc The reality is which is the point that he makes the author and hisher work become irreversibly intertwined through the writing process Reality and fiction become intertwined Mitchel discovers that us readers love novels that indirectly echo or provides an insight to the author’s life More on that lateruestions are also hugely important to this book posing classics such as ‘But why call it a novel’ Mitchel is a formidably inuisitive critic and his reviews act as prompts to our further discovery He doesn’t provide a one fits all answer in fact he can’t even answer all of his own uestions He realises that our satisfaction of reading comes from having all the answers – ‘Isn’t it the job of fiction to fill in these blanks’ – but it’s these blanks that make us want to come back and read So what about this book’s author and his relationship to his work We get an insight into his own ‘writing space’ early on in the text complete with pictures His self deprecating tone here really conveys passion in his work but doesn’t give too much away about himself He saves that until the end of the book which creates such poignancy and goes to underscore his uestioning of reality in both fiction and nonfiction such as war reporting texts throughout He writes about a traumatic event in his own life as if a piece of fiction serving up plenty of suspense After all what had happened to him meant that he actually had no memory of the event thus the only way of discussing his experience was by creating distance between himself and his hospitalised self Before our eyes he transforms from authoritative voice to unreliable narrator to make his point about subjectivity in reality much clearer I didn’t uite understand the order of the reviews when I began reading but ending with this was touchingI just wish there was discussion of texts by women writers but when discussing the literary canon perhaps Mitchel had no choice but to produce a collection so male dominant That aside I come away from this – at times complicated but most definitely thought provoking – text with a renewed excitement for critical reading I hope this was Mitchel’s aimIf you’re looking for a book that can inspire you to read critically for enjoyment while giving you ‘space’ to come up with your own conclusions This Space of Writing is a great place to startReviewed by Abby at wwwwhisperingstoriescom


  3. Stephen Stephen says:

    This collection of essays on literature written by Britain's first book blogger is overwhelmingly sad not for being singular and noble but from someone who is probably built that way emotionally His corrections to literature proceed from that for instance he sees David Foster Wallace's suicide as primarily a failure of literary stature not a clinical one Pronouncements of decline follow If Mitchel in his anti philistinism represents the soul of literature comedy is missing from the other half of the coin Even James Wood at his most dour and pessimistic and protestant is able to crack a joke or two like Hamlet did on his way to a fatally disastrous performance One of the great triumphs of literary culture's gatekeepers since Beckett and the modernists uttered their last a word that is only conceived pejoratively by Mitchel is the democratization of who receives admission Even if this impulse has produced an embarrassing amount of ignorance in publishable form you would think a game which is now open to everyone should at least get a nod for that Mitchel Lars Iyer who wrote the introduction and Gabriel Josipovici a hero of theirs have railed against a smug elite British literary culture announcing from their nooks on the web that the game is over literature is finished Like Will Self they need an explanation for why excellent minds dedicated to literature like theirs it is implied haven't caught on globally Elitism meets the marginal producing of the same For Mitchel God is whatever Maurice Blanchot was after in his overly refined literary generalizations Example Art reuires that he who practises it should be immolated to art transformed into the empty animated space where art's summons is heard etc The word transcend is a favorite odd for someone who has no patience with religion Like many who place too much stock in literature's exceptionalism when he states the self the notion comes to a full stop when announced with fanfare Conor Cruise O'Brien has a great line about one of Edmund Burke's contemporaries that applies to this de centered mode of writing Rockingham was a high minded nobleman but intellectually indolent so he needed help in finding what to be high minded about There are those who need literature in the same way to feel less alone perhaps forgetful of what Marx had to say about becoming farcical for repeating the past All that being said Mitchel knows how to write with depth and clarity and may be appreciated better by others who have a pessimistic outlook than I do about the state of the game


  4. Stephen Stephen says:

    Jen Craig has reviewed this here


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12 thoughts on “This Space of Writing

  1. Jeff Bursey Jeff Bursey says:

    Longer review to come but for now this is an essential book for those whose tastes include Josipovici Blanchot Knausgaard Bernard Beckett Kafka you get the general drift While not every essay is at top level this could be said about anyone most contain interesting analyses comments challenges to critical orthodoxy and a persuasive knowledge about writing from Europe especially Highly recommendedLonger review here

  2. Whispering Stories Whispering Stories says:

    This Space of Writing is 280 pages of Stephen Mitchel’s thought provoking insights into how and why we read and write We follow as he explores the work of acclaimed writers – including Proust Kafka and Beckett no less – and digs deep into the processes of writingWho is Stephen Mitchel He’s widely known as Britain’s first ‘book blogger’ having begun writing online in 1996 This collection of reviews thoughts along with snippets about his life are the culmination of his 20 year online presence and of course his genuine love of reading which dates back even furtherFirstly I’m in awe of his dedication to book blogging This collection of reviews really celebrates this form but his reviews go beyond the face of the text We start with an appreciation of the ‘Frank Bascombe’ novels by Richard Ford However this is where like a few of the texts mentioned in the review I haven’t actually read what is being discussed Admittedly this does become a source of slight frustration but Mitchel writes in an inclusive style that allows his reader to take something away from his reviews without fully knowing the texts or authors he discusses In this instance then I found it fascinating how Mitchel writes about Bascombe’s the character writing rather than Ford’s It’s another way of delving deeper into the text itselfMitchel later muses ‘There is undoubtable pleasure in beginning to read the story of another’s life’ I couldn’t agree Not only is reading a form of escapism but there are didactic elements the opportunity to learn about a culture society historical event particular person etc The reality is which is the point that he makes the author and hisher work become irreversibly intertwined through the writing process Reality and fiction become intertwined Mitchel discovers that us readers love novels that indirectly echo or provides an insight to the author’s life More on that lateruestions are also hugely important to this book posing classics such as ‘But why call it a novel’ Mitchel is a formidably inuisitive critic and his reviews act as prompts to our further discovery He doesn’t provide a one fits all answer in fact he can’t even answer all of his own uestions He realises that our satisfaction of reading comes from having all the answers – ‘Isn’t it the job of fiction to fill in these blanks’ – but it’s these blanks that make us want to come back and read So what about this book’s author and his relationship to his work We get an insight into his own ‘writing space’ early on in the text complete with pictures His self deprecating tone here really conveys passion in his work but doesn’t give too much away about himself He saves that until the end of the book which creates such poignancy and goes to underscore his uestioning of reality in both fiction and nonfiction such as war reporting texts throughout He writes about a traumatic event in his own life as if a piece of fiction serving up plenty of suspense After all what had happened to him meant that he actually had no memory of the event thus the only way of discussing his experience was by creating distance between himself and his hospitalised self Before our eyes he transforms from authoritative voice to unreliable narrator to make his point about subjectivity in reality much clearer I didn’t uite understand the order of the reviews when I began reading but ending with this was touchingI just wish there was discussion of texts by women writers but when discussing the literary canon perhaps Mitchel had no choice but to produce a collection so male dominant That aside I come away from this – at times complicated but most definitely thought provoking – text with a renewed excitement for critical reading I hope this was Mitchel’s aimIf you’re looking for a book that can inspire you to read critically for enjoyment while giving you ‘space’ to come up with your own conclusions This Space of Writing is a great place to startReviewed by Abby at wwwwhisperingstoriescom

  3. Stephen Stephen says:

    This collection of essays on literature written by Britain's first book blogger is overwhelmingly sad not for being singular and noble but from someone who is probably built that way emotionally His corrections to literature proceed from that for instance he sees David Foster Wallace's suicide as primarily a failure of literary stature not a clinical one Pronouncements of decline follow If Mitchel in his anti philistinism represents the soul of literature comedy is missing from the other half of the coin Even James Wood at his most dour and pessimistic and protestant is able to crack a joke or two like Hamlet did on his way to a fatally disastrous performance One of the great triumphs of literary culture's gatekeepers since Beckett and the modernists uttered their last a word that is only conceived pejoratively by Mitchel is the democratization of who receives admission Even if this impulse has produced an embarrassing amount of ignorance in publishable form you would think a game which is now open to everyone should at least get a nod for that Mitchel Lars Iyer who wrote the introduction and Gabriel Josipovici a hero of theirs have railed against a smug elite British literary culture announcing from their nooks on the web that the game is over literature is finished Like Will Self they need an explanation for why excellent minds dedicated to literature like theirs it is implied haven't caught on globally Elitism meets the marginal producing of the same For Mitchel God is whatever Maurice Blanchot was after in his overly refined literary generalizations Example Art reuires that he who practises it should be immolated to art transformed into the empty animated space where art's summons is heard etc The word transcend is a favorite odd for someone who has no patience with religion Like many who place too much stock in literature's exceptionalism when he states the self the notion comes to a full stop when announced with fanfare Conor Cruise O'Brien has a great line about one of Edmund Burke's contemporaries that applies to this de centered mode of writing Rockingham was a high minded nobleman but intellectually indolent so he needed help in finding what to be high minded about There are those who need literature in the same way to feel less alone perhaps forgetful of what Marx had to say about becoming farcical for repeating the past All that being said Mitchel knows how to write with depth and clarity and may be appreciated better by others who have a pessimistic outlook than I do about the state of the game

  4. Stephen Stephen says:

    Jen Craig has reviewed this here

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