The Wood for the Trees MOBI ↠ Wood for the PDF

The Wood for the Trees MOBI ↠ Wood for the PDF


The Wood for the Trees [Download] ➼ The Wood for the Trees By Richard Fortey – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk From one of our greatest science writers this biography of a beech and bluebell wood through diverse moods and changing seasons combines stunning natural history with the ancient history of the countr From one for the ePUB ☆ of our greatest science writers this biography of a beech and bluebell wood through diverse moods and changing seasons combines stunning natural history with the ancient history of the countryside to tell the full story of the British landscape‘The woods are the great beauty of this country A fine forest like The Wood eBook ¸ beech wood far beautiful than anything else which we have seen in its vicinity’ is how John Stuart Mill described a small patch of beech and bluebell woodland buried deeply in the Chiltern Hills and now owned by Richard Fortey Drawing upon a lifetime of scientific expertise and abiding love of nature Fortey uses Wood for the PDF ´ his small wood to tell a wider story of the ever changing British landscape human influence on the countryside over many centuries and the vital interactions between flora fauna and fungiThe trees provide a majestic stage for woodland animals and plants to reveal their own stories Fortey presents his wood as an interwoven collection of different habitats rich in species His attention ranges from the beech and cherry trees that dominate the wood to the flints underfoot; the red kites and woodpeckers that soar overhead; the lichens mosses and liverworts decorating the branches as well as the myriad species of spiders moths beetles and crane flies The species of fungi identified in the wood capture his attention as much as familiar deer shrews and dormiceFortey is a naturalist who believes that all organisms are as interesting as human beings – and certainly important than the observer So this book is a close examination of nature and human history He proves that poetic writing is compatible with scientific precision The book is filled with details of living animals and plants charting the passage of the seasons visits by fellow enthusiasts; the play of light between branches; the influence of geology; and how woodland influences history architecture and industry On every page he shows how an intimate study of one small wood can reveal so much about the natural world and demonstrates his relish for the incomparable pleasures of discovery.

  • Hardcover
  • 320 pages
  • The Wood for the Trees
  • Richard Fortey
  • 07 July 2016
  • 9780008104665

About the Author: Richard Fortey

Richard Fortey for the ePUB ☆ is a senior paleontologist at the Natural History Museum in London and a Fellow of the Royal Society He was Collier Professor in the Public Understanding of Science and Technology at the Institute for Advanced Studies at the University of Bristol in His books have been widely acclaimed Life A The Wood eBook ¸ Natural History of the First Four Billion Years of Life on Earth Knopf was short.



10 thoughts on “The Wood for the Trees

  1. Peter Tillman Peter Tillman says:

    This book started out interesting and I've liked a number of his previous books he's a fellow geologist This one's about his retirement home in a rural wooded of England and his efforts to get to know it It would probably be interesting to me if I lived in that general area As I don't I've stalled may or may not continueReturned unfinished 25 stars for me but UK readers shouldn't be put off he's a fine writer

  2. Darrin Darrin says:

    When I grow up I want to be like Richard ForteyI noted early on that when I first started reading this book I thought I would grow bored of reading about the natural history of a forest in the UK Boy was I wrongI loved this book because if you know me or at least are friends with me on FB you know how much I like taking photos of the flora and fauna that inhabit our back yard If I had my druthers I would stay home and catalog it learn to draw it and explore the inner workings of how it all creates an ecology behind our garage and under the 100 year old oak tree with it's beautiful canopyMy intention fresh out of high school as a newly minted freshman at the University of Michigan was to major in the biological sciences or failing that paleontology Well that never happened and now I sit here with a Russian Language and Literature degree that has no relevance to what I currently do event planning for a 5 star hotel here in my hometown All the same nature and natural history still hold a fascination for me and Richard Fortey the now retired British paleontologist formerly of Oxford University has written a book that encompasses the natural history and human history of Grim's Dyke Wood a small forest that he and his wife Jackie purchased in 2011He is a captivating writer with a dry wit and seemingly natural aptitude for describing his explorations in minute detail The story or rather history is told in vignettes roughly starting with the earliest history of the area to modern times Each chapter is a month starting with April and proceeding through the year The vignettes weave the story of the seasonal flora and fauna human habitation and exploitation of Grim's Dyke Wood and the area that surrounds the wood and the impact it has and has had over time At the end of it all the story he tells is a continuous and seamless wholeBooks like this one lead me to explore other interests and to find other books which I already have I am also inspired to take photos take notes and find out about the little patch of wilderness in my own backyard

  3. Mackay Mackay says:

    What an interesting gentle fabulous book It reads like a memoir but it's a mélange of many things include a few recipes and how to ideas mixed in about a little wood and all its denizens in the Chiltern Hills of England Some history some easily digested science some poetic descriptions In a time of extreme stress and unhappiness that the end of 2016 is this book brought peace and contemplation as nothing else has I just hope the Grim's Dyke Wood survives what the next years bring

  4. Jean Jean says:

    Able to draw you from one intense and vivid description of beauty to the nextThe Wood for the Trees is a title with two meanings It refers to a saying Can't see the wood for the trees which is defined by the Cambridge Dictionary as to be unable to understand a situation clearly because you are too involved in it The first meaning possibly could involve the Darwinian history of the area as described to the reader by the author The other meaning closely embracing this beautiful book is a reference to the specific land that the author and his wife purchased Grimm's Dyke Wood and what he decides to do with itRichard Fortey is a highly regarded paleontologist who has written a number of well received books The Wood for the Trees is a chronicle month by month of how he views the four acres named Grimm's Dyke Wood which he and his wife Jackie have bought are beginning to learn about and are falling in love with The subtitle One Man's Long View of Nature is an example of how the author will combine the present with the past using his extraordinary talents as an observer along with those of some of his friends to create a distilled perception of this place he now calls home Formerly this classic English beechland has been inhabited changed altered and lived on for thousands of years Early on in this book he speaks of a cabinet of curiosities such as English gentlemen had in the 1800s He commissions one from a local artisan using a felled cherry wood tree from his acreage It is impossible to describe how exciting fascinating thoughtful and informative this book is It spans thousands of years It also reflects on microscopically proportioned living creatures in Grimm's Dyke Wood and how they affect life for the author his wife and his friendsThe intention of the book is to understand what has happened to this parcel of land and what will happen to it now that Great Britain's economy doesn't rise and fall with rivers water and most specifically woodlands If you love nature you will be hanging on every single word Richard Fortey writes You will picture every single leaf he describes the color of the light through the trees the shapes of their trunks and for example the masses of English bluebells They are described in crowds are so magnificent you can see what he sees and your breath is taken awayThe author explains that as he began to know his own property better he realizes that the romantic view of the forest is only one part of what he wishes to convey His other intention is to convey not surprisingly given his background a scientific forensic view If you are fascinated by birdsong cherry blossoms genetic mutations in the woods a lone white bluebell and even a recipe for Ground Elder Soup the chapter April will have you entranced and off you go into this amazing book In June it is time for a bit of mothing This is something the author's friends do with trapsThe generator they bring along with their trap attract a number of beautiful moths The author and his friends outside of the light and identify the moths The purpose of this will simply be to photograph and then let the moths go It is a beautifully described intriguing foray into night time in the woods It was written in such a vibrant manner I might as well have been thereOctober brings beechnuts showering down from the trees as well as a masterful discussion of mushrooms of all sorts Do not miss it if you are a fungi freakIn December the author writes that the wood is very still and sharply coldEvery twig is decked with ice he notes His descriptions of this time as Christmas is drawing near is beautiful He writes about collecting holly and ivy seeds to propagate with a wonderful absorption In March the vernal euinox draws near and he finds a dormouse's nest for his cabinet Richard Fortey weaves his story of these four acres He has shown how his property has always played its part for thousands of years It has survived until now He uestions the future The future of woods Will it be useful? Formerly it provided game fuel charcoal chair legs and What does the future hold for wood now? His cabinet complete he is able to place his collection of treasures within it and also the notebook he kept month by month Curiosity is satisfied For a whileA very thought worthy and satisfying book by a truly wonderful author Richard Fortey

  5. Jgrace Jgrace says:

    The Wood for the Trees One Man’s Long View of Nature Fortey 4 starsRichard Fortney is a British paleontologist and author This book is an ongoing journal of a yearlong study of several acres of beech and bluebell wood that he bought after retiring from his position at the British Museum Each chapter is devoted to a month of the year Fortey discusses his observations of the botany biology and geology of the woodland He researches the human history of the surrounding area and discusses the ecological issues facing the woodland in the futureI thought this book was very engaging and readable in small doses Each ‘month’ was divided into a variety of sub topics of two or three pages in length Such a wide variety of topics; ‘Nettle Fertilizer’ ‘Chanterelle Potatoes’ ‘Saved by the Chair’ ‘Rot and Renewal’ A plethora of trivia for example necessary culling and cutting of the Lambeth beeches was made marginally profitable by the demand for Potterish toy broomsticks Or did you know that collected deer droppings can be incubated to sprout a variety of microscopic fungi ? Fortey makes it all interesting and occasionally funny with extremely bad but irresistible puns This book reminded me of what I used read on lunch breaks magazine articles from Smithsonian and Natural History magazines Not a good book to get lost in for hours at a time but great for a coffee break I had the audiobook which is read beautifully by Michael Page but it is much better to have the text for maps photography and other illustrations

  6. Anna Anna says:

    So very charming and so very British I just love the enthusiasm and all the historical and biological facts jammed into this Richard Fortey buys a woods go figure and then learns about beech trees furniture and walking stick making mushrooms bugs birds deer moss from the moss man and all sorts of things It's all dingley dell parambulations through the woods and cottages all ticketyboo The text is charming and enthusiastic the narrator is charming and veddy veddy British and I just loved it

  7. P. Timothy P. Timothy says:

    I have a soft spot for almanac type books arranged around the seasons Fortey is an agile witty writer with a great ability for apt description Lovely and erudite book that skips effortlessly from for example deep Saxon history of his wood into the types of butterflies found there Highly recommended for fans of John McPhee's nature writing; Edwin Way Teale fans et al

  8. Kate Kate says:

    NopeWhat a marketing scam This is not a biography of a beech and bluebell wood It is Fortey's diary and ego made large I couldn't even make it through the first chapterIt's a shame too because skimming the text the bits where Fortey doesn't jump in front of the spotlight are actually well written and extremely interesting But I can't tolerate an author who impedes his own work by demanding to be seen and validatedIn the meantime I'll stick to Robert Macfarlane who knows how take a step back and let the landscape shine

  9. Robert Walkley Robert Walkley says:

    Eons ago I read Richard Fortey’s Life A Natural History of the First Four Billion Years of Life on Earth and enjoyed it though retaining little of scientific information he presented Science is not my forte Recently I decided to check out what he’d been up to Enter The Wood for the Trees One Man’s Long View of Nature This book which is divided into twelve chapters one for each month is a memoir that tells the story of a plot of land four acres that Fortey and his wife bought and moved to in the Chiltern Hills of Oxfordshire England Fortey a retired scientist seems to know about almost everything he encounters rocks trees insects birds and mammals flowers and human history from well before Hadrian’s Wall up to George Harrison another tenant of the Hills And when he doesn’t know something there’s usually an expert around to harvest the necessary info from Fortey is like a walking encyclopedia I date myself Better to say he probably know about a lot things than even Google or Wikipedia do But he is a much personable and genial guide than a computer He has a wry and often self deprecating sense of humor He feels very at home in the world and in his own skin His book almost disproves Melville’s assertion that “Science lights but cannot warm” Fortey is a great traveller even though he doesn’t go too far from home Literally The book’s main drawback is that Fortey can go on and on for pages about any subject Great But what if you’re not interested in that subject? Like flies for example Or waspsIf you read the book you’ll learn a lot about Fortey and Chiltern Hills And when you step outside your front door you’ll wonder about the natural world you live in

  10. Juliet Wilson Juliet Wilson says:

    Richard Fortey is a scientist best known for his work in paleontology you can read my brief reviews of other books of his here The Wood for the Trees however is a wonderfully thorough exploration of a small patch of woodland that Fortey owns in the Chiltern Hills He takes us through the history of the woods through the centuries including how thewoods have been affected by changing land use patterns and changing fashions in using wood as a material for furniture and fuel He details the seasonal changes in the plant and animal life of the woods Fortey isn't the kind of nature writer to wax lyrical about nature in general he waxes lyrical about the details of things that many people would overlook and he notices everything he has found well over 300 species of fungi in his wood He is adept too at making the connections finding cherry pits that have been nibbled by wood mice and then finding where the mice are livingHe is also very aware of his own limitations and has consulted experts in the fields where he isn't able to identify species himself weaving their input into the complete story of his woodsFortey would be a brilliant companion for a walk through any British woodland and reading this book inspires me to pay even attention when I'm next in the woods This is a totally fascinating and satisfying read for anyone who is interested in natural history A book to enjoy and learn from and read over and over again

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10 thoughts on “The Wood for the Trees

  1. Peter Tillman Peter Tillman says:

    This book started out interesting and I've liked a number of his previous books he's a fellow geologist This one's about his retirement home in a rural wooded of England and his efforts to get to know it It would probably be interesting to me if I lived in that general area As I don't I've stalled may or may not continueReturned unfinished 25 stars for me but UK readers shouldn't be put off he's a fine writer

  2. Darrin Darrin says:

    When I grow up I want to be like Richard ForteyI noted early on that when I first started reading this book I thought I would grow bored of reading about the natural history of a forest in the UK Boy was I wrongI loved this book because if you know me or at least are friends with me on FB you know how much I like taking photos of the flora and fauna that inhabit our back yard If I had my druthers I would stay home and catalog it learn to draw it and explore the inner workings of how it all creates an ecology behind our garage and under the 100 year old oak tree with it's beautiful canopyMy intention fresh out of high school as a newly minted freshman at the University of Michigan was to major in the biological sciences or failing that paleontology Well that never happened and now I sit here with a Russian Language and Literature degree that has no relevance to what I currently do event planning for a 5 star hotel here in my hometown All the same nature and natural history still hold a fascination for me and Richard Fortey the now retired British paleontologist formerly of Oxford University has written a book that encompasses the natural history and human history of Grim's Dyke Wood a small forest that he and his wife Jackie purchased in 2011He is a captivating writer with a dry wit and seemingly natural aptitude for describing his explorations in minute detail The story or rather history is told in vignettes roughly starting with the earliest history of the area to modern times Each chapter is a month starting with April and proceeding through the year The vignettes weave the story of the seasonal flora and fauna human habitation and exploitation of Grim's Dyke Wood and the area that surrounds the wood and the impact it has and has had over time At the end of it all the story he tells is a continuous and seamless wholeBooks like this one lead me to explore other interests and to find other books which I already have I am also inspired to take photos take notes and find out about the little patch of wilderness in my own backyard

  3. Mackay Mackay says:

    What an interesting gentle fabulous book It reads like a memoir but it's a mélange of many things include a few recipes and how to ideas mixed in about a little wood and all its denizens in the Chiltern Hills of England Some history some easily digested science some poetic descriptions In a time of extreme stress and unhappiness that the end of 2016 is this book brought peace and contemplation as nothing else has I just hope the Grim's Dyke Wood survives what the next years bring

  4. Jean Jean says:

    Able to draw you from one intense and vivid description of beauty to the nextThe Wood for the Trees is a title with two meanings It refers to a saying Can't see the wood for the trees which is defined by the Cambridge Dictionary as to be unable to understand a situation clearly because you are too involved in it The first meaning possibly could involve the Darwinian history of the area as described to the reader by the author The other meaning closely embracing this beautiful book is a reference to the specific land that the author and his wife purchased Grimm's Dyke Wood and what he decides to do with itRichard Fortey is a highly regarded paleontologist who has written a number of well received books The Wood for the Trees is a chronicle month by month of how he views the four acres named Grimm's Dyke Wood which he and his wife Jackie have bought are beginning to learn about and are falling in love with The subtitle One Man's Long View of Nature is an example of how the author will combine the present with the past using his extraordinary talents as an observer along with those of some of his friends to create a distilled perception of this place he now calls home Formerly this classic English beechland has been inhabited changed altered and lived on for thousands of years Early on in this book he speaks of a cabinet of curiosities such as English gentlemen had in the 1800s He commissions one from a local artisan using a felled cherry wood tree from his acreage It is impossible to describe how exciting fascinating thoughtful and informative this book is It spans thousands of years It also reflects on microscopically proportioned living creatures in Grimm's Dyke Wood and how they affect life for the author his wife and his friendsThe intention of the book is to understand what has happened to this parcel of land and what will happen to it now that Great Britain's economy doesn't rise and fall with rivers water and most specifically woodlands If you love nature you will be hanging on every single word Richard Fortey writes You will picture every single leaf he describes the color of the light through the trees the shapes of their trunks and for example the masses of English bluebells They are described in crowds are so magnificent you can see what he sees and your breath is taken awayThe author explains that as he began to know his own property better he realizes that the romantic view of the forest is only one part of what he wishes to convey His other intention is to convey not surprisingly given his background a scientific forensic view If you are fascinated by birdsong cherry blossoms genetic mutations in the woods a lone white bluebell and even a recipe for Ground Elder Soup the chapter April will have you entranced and off you go into this amazing book In June it is time for a bit of mothing This is something the author's friends do with trapsThe generator they bring along with their trap attract a number of beautiful moths The author and his friends outside of the light and identify the moths The purpose of this will simply be to photograph and then let the moths go It is a beautifully described intriguing foray into night time in the woods It was written in such a vibrant manner I might as well have been thereOctober brings beechnuts showering down from the trees as well as a masterful discussion of mushrooms of all sorts Do not miss it if you are a fungi freakIn December the author writes that the wood is very still and sharply coldEvery twig is decked with ice he notes His descriptions of this time as Christmas is drawing near is beautiful He writes about collecting holly and ivy seeds to propagate with a wonderful absorption In March the vernal euinox draws near and he finds a dormouse's nest for his cabinet Richard Fortey weaves his story of these four acres He has shown how his property has always played its part for thousands of years It has survived until now He uestions the future The future of woods Will it be useful? Formerly it provided game fuel charcoal chair legs and What does the future hold for wood now? His cabinet complete he is able to place his collection of treasures within it and also the notebook he kept month by month Curiosity is satisfied For a whileA very thought worthy and satisfying book by a truly wonderful author Richard Fortey

  5. Jgrace Jgrace says:

    The Wood for the Trees One Man’s Long View of Nature Fortey 4 starsRichard Fortney is a British paleontologist and author This book is an ongoing journal of a yearlong study of several acres of beech and bluebell wood that he bought after retiring from his position at the British Museum Each chapter is devoted to a month of the year Fortey discusses his observations of the botany biology and geology of the woodland He researches the human history of the surrounding area and discusses the ecological issues facing the woodland in the futureI thought this book was very engaging and readable in small doses Each ‘month’ was divided into a variety of sub topics of two or three pages in length Such a wide variety of topics; ‘Nettle Fertilizer’ ‘Chanterelle Potatoes’ ‘Saved by the Chair’ ‘Rot and Renewal’ A plethora of trivia for example necessary culling and cutting of the Lambeth beeches was made marginally profitable by the demand for Potterish toy broomsticks Or did you know that collected deer droppings can be incubated to sprout a variety of microscopic fungi ? Fortey makes it all interesting and occasionally funny with extremely bad but irresistible puns This book reminded me of what I used read on lunch breaks magazine articles from Smithsonian and Natural History magazines Not a good book to get lost in for hours at a time but great for a coffee break I had the audiobook which is read beautifully by Michael Page but it is much better to have the text for maps photography and other illustrations

  6. Anna Anna says:

    So very charming and so very British I just love the enthusiasm and all the historical and biological facts jammed into this Richard Fortey buys a woods go figure and then learns about beech trees furniture and walking stick making mushrooms bugs birds deer moss from the moss man and all sorts of things It's all dingley dell parambulations through the woods and cottages all ticketyboo The text is charming and enthusiastic the narrator is charming and veddy veddy British and I just loved it

  7. P. Timothy P. Timothy says:

    I have a soft spot for almanac type books arranged around the seasons Fortey is an agile witty writer with a great ability for apt description Lovely and erudite book that skips effortlessly from for example deep Saxon history of his wood into the types of butterflies found there Highly recommended for fans of John McPhee's nature writing; Edwin Way Teale fans et al

  8. Kate Kate says:

    NopeWhat a marketing scam This is not a biography of a beech and bluebell wood It is Fortey's diary and ego made large I couldn't even make it through the first chapterIt's a shame too because skimming the text the bits where Fortey doesn't jump in front of the spotlight are actually well written and extremely interesting But I can't tolerate an author who impedes his own work by demanding to be seen and validatedIn the meantime I'll stick to Robert Macfarlane who knows how take a step back and let the landscape shine

  9. Robert Walkley Robert Walkley says:

    Eons ago I read Richard Fortey’s Life A Natural History of the First Four Billion Years of Life on Earth and enjoyed it though retaining little of scientific information he presented Science is not my forte Recently I decided to check out what he’d been up to Enter The Wood for the Trees One Man’s Long View of Nature This book which is divided into twelve chapters one for each month is a memoir that tells the story of a plot of land four acres that Fortey and his wife bought and moved to in the Chiltern Hills of Oxfordshire England Fortey a retired scientist seems to know about almost everything he encounters rocks trees insects birds and mammals flowers and human history from well before Hadrian’s Wall up to George Harrison another tenant of the Hills And when he doesn’t know something there’s usually an expert around to harvest the necessary info from Fortey is like a walking encyclopedia I date myself Better to say he probably know about a lot things than even Google or Wikipedia do But he is a much personable and genial guide than a computer He has a wry and often self deprecating sense of humor He feels very at home in the world and in his own skin His book almost disproves Melville’s assertion that “Science lights but cannot warm” Fortey is a great traveller even though he doesn’t go too far from home Literally The book’s main drawback is that Fortey can go on and on for pages about any subject Great But what if you’re not interested in that subject? Like flies for example Or waspsIf you read the book you’ll learn a lot about Fortey and Chiltern Hills And when you step outside your front door you’ll wonder about the natural world you live in

  10. Juliet Wilson Juliet Wilson says:

    Richard Fortey is a scientist best known for his work in paleontology you can read my brief reviews of other books of his here The Wood for the Trees however is a wonderfully thorough exploration of a small patch of woodland that Fortey owns in the Chiltern Hills He takes us through the history of the woods through the centuries including how thewoods have been affected by changing land use patterns and changing fashions in using wood as a material for furniture and fuel He details the seasonal changes in the plant and animal life of the woods Fortey isn't the kind of nature writer to wax lyrical about nature in general he waxes lyrical about the details of things that many people would overlook and he notices everything he has found well over 300 species of fungi in his wood He is adept too at making the connections finding cherry pits that have been nibbled by wood mice and then finding where the mice are livingHe is also very aware of his own limitations and has consulted experts in the fields where he isn't able to identify species himself weaving their input into the complete story of his woodsFortey would be a brilliant companion for a walk through any British woodland and reading this book inspires me to pay even attention when I'm next in the woods This is a totally fascinating and satisfying read for anyone who is interested in natural history A book to enjoy and learn from and read over and over again

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