Viscera PDF/EPUB Þ Paperback

Viscera PDF/EPUB Þ Paperback

Viscera ➶ [Reading] ➸ Viscera By Gabrielle Squailia ➫ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk A dystopian fantasy of earthuakes killing fields drug addiction and routine eviscerations that is also profoundly humane and laugh out loud funny —Camille DeAngelis author of Bones and AllThe Gone A A dystopian fantasy of earthuakes killing fields drug addiction and routine eViscerations that is also profoundly humane and laugh out loud funny —Camille DeAngelis author of Bones and AllThe Gone Away gods were real once and taller than towersBut they’re long dead now buried in the catacombs beneath the city of Eth where their calcified organs radiate an eldritch power that calls out to anyone hardy enough to live in this cut throat war torn land Some survivors are human while others are close enough but all are struggling to carve out their lives in a world both unforgiving and wondrous Darkly comic and viciously original Viscera is an unforgettable journey through swords and sorcery fantasy where strangeness gleams from every nook and cranny“Exuisitely imagined deeply insightful yet scathingly witty Viscera barrels along at a scorching pace after vividly realized characters whose separate uests—for identity for revenge for release—find themselves on a collision course in a world that's simultaneously both grimdark and surreal Lusciously weird and utterly uniue” —Nicole Kornher Stace author of Archivist Wasp“Viscera is a work of gleeful weirdness set in a world that calls to mind China Miéville's Bas Lag novels and full of characters fighting to reshape themselves and their destinies in search of deep and resonant truth” —Kat Howard author of Roses and Rot.


10 thoughts on “Viscera

  1. Bogi Takács Bogi Takács says:

    I think I have found the sleeper hit of 2016 and it is full of guts LiterallyViscera is a dark fantasy novel – wait a body horror novel – does it count as horrific if it is presented as “just the way we do things”? – a sword sorcery satire – a — wait what? clears throat Viscera is a novel that’s hard to categorize But it certainly contains visceraRead the rest on Bogi Reads the World


  2. Zazu Zazu says:

    There are some stories that rarely get told Viscera is not only a rarely told—and sorely needed—story it is also an exuisite amalgamation of heart wrenching truths and singularly eccentric fictionsA motley crew is assembled on a journey thrown together by mere chance as life so often has it the unkillable Ashlan whose torn out guts or poison filled veins just keep regenerating anew; Rafe a wandering junkie with chest pains that hint at deeper secrets; the sinister walking talking cloth puppet Hollis; and the inscrutable Tanka a delightfully outlandish mix of nature goddess and mad frankenstein esue biologist Colorful characters though they may be their feelings and motivations betray their humanity They are indeed just like us flawed people with painful secrets they are each in their own ways trying to escapeThere is little else that can be told of the story or characters without spoiling the excellent build up slow reveal and breath taking twists The hard truths these characters must face about their own identities and pasts are peeled back slowly and painfully over the course of their uest and as they get closer and closer to an end goal they themselves could never expect Though initially shockingly gruesome their literal eviscerations and physical wounds serve a powerful metaphorical purpose Suailia’s use of literal viscera blood and intestines tendons and bone allegorically matches her deep exploration of identity issues We cannot live without our guts; we cannot truly live without acknowledging the truth about our very soulsSo often books with characters outside the default straight cis white narrative are relegated to positions of lesser influence The publishing industry often classifies these stories as “special interest” and critics so often give negative feedback due to being unable “relate” to their characters It is extraordinarily refreshing to read a book featuring characters and issues that are so often left unmentioned or unnoticed yet a book that is not marketed as an “issues” story Instead Viscera is a fun vibrant romp through an imaginative landscape populated by uniuely weird people who yet feel for so many reasons viscerally real and yes relatableIn Viscera Suailia shows us that sometimes the best way to speak our most uniue truths is to use unconventional fictions And regardless of how far any of us may be from living as our most authentic selves we may be comforted by the wise words one of the protagonists leaves us with claiming they are true of every soul “How they tried how long how hard they tried”


  3. Kaa Kaa says:

    So first of all it's important to know that this is a book filled with blood and guts and death There's lots of gore lots of trauma and lots of violence There's anti trans and anti ueer violence and threats It addresses addiction and suicidality While it's written in a very matter of fact way that makes these things at least for me easier to read about there's still a lot of darkness in this book But there's also a lot of humor and in the end a lot of hope A gorgeously written wonderfully creepy story


  4. Cameron Sant Cameron Sant says:

    THIS BOOK IS VERY GOOD AND VERY CREATIVE but it is not for me If I rated it based on uality I'd give it a 4 or a 5This is a dark fantasy about an immortal woman who produces most of the book's gore who falls in with a puppet made of guts The other main character is a trans man drug addict who has fallen in with a group of addicts who kill for drugs and worship Lady Luck Rich fun world building which was my favorite part of the book The city the story revolves around is built on the bodies of dead gods who cause earthuakes when too many people have diedI felt the characterization of the two main characters is also very good and thoughtful and the minor characters are very uniue and uirky TW Gore gore gore Creative uses of gore and like that's the book Escalating gore creativity Death I read an interview where the writer who is a trans woman said this book is based on things she finds scary as a trans person so like lots of trans specific trauma misgendering anti trans murders naked trans reveals etc most of it centered on a trans man He struggles to keep a binder on most of the book for various reasons which is a trigger I didn't know I had Drugs that involve getting stung by beetles Drug addicts feature prominently People held captive and having experiments performed on them against their will There's probably I can't remember


  5. Tatiana Tatiana says:

    I thought I had marked this on my Goodreads when I started but I guess notThis was a very interesting read and very difficult for me to describe what exactly it's about But it's considered a fantasy novel and it's a really uniue way to engage the genre If there were fantasy novels like this I think I'd get back into reading it for sure


  6. Isaac R. Fellman Isaac R. Fellman says:

    A dazzler Wildly adventurous and experimental and yet it plays perfectly within its self created rules — like a chessboard with only knights Suailia gives us a rich cast of beautiful dirtbags characters who don’t remotely try to ingratiate themselves but who nonetheless make me wish I could spend a lot time with them and to be honest I never have that feeling these days Absurdly powerful reverent and irreverent whenever it’s right to be so and one of the finest SFF novels I’ve ever read


  7. Renay Renay says:

    Body horror gets in the way of my emotional connection to stories I guess? The writing was so lush and good though that I'm sad I didn't like it


  8. Lulu (the library leopard) Lulu (the library leopard) says:

    35Really weird uniue though sometimes I had a bit of a hard time keep tracking of stuff Hopefully a longer review to come because this book was doing some really interesting things


  9. Michael Hitchcock Michael Hitchcock says:

    I'm tempted to just say writing VISCERA took a lot of GUTS get it? and leave it there Because guts are intimate and messy and confusing when you've got them all splayed out the temptation is to just let them speak for themselves But I do want to talk about a few of the things in these guts I found worthyViscera was sort of a strangely constructed story The two main characters Rafe and Ashlan had almost the same journey though neither really helped or were even fully aware of one another's struggles or goals But both characters were disturbed people who found peace by embracing their transformation creatingaccepting a new family for themselves and reconciling themselves with the spiritual practices of their birthIt's funny that in a story with a luck worshipping drug addled murder cult killer gut filled robots and dead but lingering Gods the actual plot feels that straightforward and earnest to me but that's what I felt was important here You might be in it for the magic and battles and witty dialogue but I'm looking at the guts and trying to make sense of themThe fact that the two main characters had such a faithful reflection of one another's journey towards peace I felt very strongly that Suaillia was trying to get us to see the eternal universal struggle with identity change family and faith that all individuals must takeBut this wasn't a difference erasing EVERYONE IS THE SAME kind of message In fact the main antagonist was motivated by that very type of ethos To the contrary in Viscera Suaillia went in the other direction using this established universal struggle to highlight the specific differences of the struggles their characters had and how their specific identities and situations shaped and intensified that universal struggleEven though the crosswise or trans or non binary or etc seemed perhaps prevalent in this world than ours they faced a similarly severe reaction from the culture at large existing only in the liminal spaces they could find unoccupied and unseen Within these spaces they may have been able to live freely but outside was a world in which they must remain closeted or risk meeting harassment or a sudden and traumatic endingThis leads me to the most emotionally affecting part of the story for me which in an interesting parallel with their first novel is also a tragic death told in a flashback a good way through the novel that adds a lot of context to how the character got the way they wereIn this case it was Rafe's partner and major influenceintroduction into the world of the crosswise Gingerbeard Their tragic senseless death explained so well how Rafe became a drug addicted assassin cultistBut none of that would have meant anything had Suaillia not already gotten us on Rafe's side with the way they introduced and revealed him It was brave and magical to write from the drug addict's point of view and give him a voice For whatever reason in our culture they are one of the groups of people it's ok to treat as less than human But Suaillia wrote him so faithfully that by the time it was revealed he was biologically a woman we were able to be in a place to reject the gender of their birth as thoroughly as they themselves do And since trans people are widely considered socially on par with addicts as non humans unworthy of respect I found it amazing that our point of view was so tightly and sympathetically tied to theirsBut this book wasn't all transgressive politics or whatever it was full of witty dialogue and interesting relationships over the backdrop of a repressive culture ruling over a landscape of endless professional war and drawing on the power of the remnants of long dead Gods In fact I think one could read the whole thing without getting hung up on the identity politics of itThe swift skeleton of it was the plot basically an extended barter between a bunch of characters who mostly don't really care about one another but who all have what another character so desperately needs The handsome pretty flesh of it was the colorful cast and the decaying background and the repressive toppling government but the guts of it the part I wanted to think about because they were what the book was presumably named after was the transformation; the courage it took to embrace transformationWe can't recognize how we're all different until we understand the ways we are all the same but we can't see how we're all the same until we start to embrace the differences This book brought us into intimate contact with people who exist on that boundary all the time who are both exactly the same as us and at the same time wildly different Suaillia gave us deeper glimpse into that specific difference even though their differences were of a kind people are less likely to be accepting of and they gave us this glimpse in enough of a sympathetic way that we could love the characters the way we love ourselves honestly and without that pathological need to uncritically accept every single thing about themThey wrote a moral novel across the background setting of an amoral world A funhouse world that was amoral in many of the ways our own world is amoral With the speedy feel of the book and all the subtle nods to current real world practices and institutions and above all with the dead but still powerful persistent remnants of the Gods Suaillia made a great statement for these characters self directedsoul directed morality taking the good and great from the old ways In our world and in the world of the story that takes some guts and is still somehow controversial even as so many millions already live that wayBut I will reiterate one thing and close with one thing I never mentioned at all First the novel is fun and has a lot of elements of the weird and fantastic and does not need to be read into the way I did and could be enjoyed very well even only on a surface level And finally I want you to know I could be wrong about all of this I could have brought it all into my reading of the novel where it didn't belong In ancient Rome and Etrusca there were diviners called the haruspex and their entire job was to look at the splayed out guts of sanctified animals and read therein the future These diviners tell a complicated story from a heap of viscera and a different diviner would see a totally different story in the same pile of guts and that's just how things are sometimes


  10. Lara Donnelly Lara Donnelly says:

    Weird and wonderful and beautifully disgusting Viscera belongs on your shelf between China Miéville and David Edison Suailia uses body horror to talk about body politics in a way that hurts just as much as a knife to the gut And she sprinkles it all with a strange combination of steampunk sci fi and high fantasyThis book has brings together a sadistic talking doll a snarky superhealer who just wants to die a one armed snaggle toothed con artist a trans man assassin from a long line clan of corpse cleaning priests and a witch without a womb hell bent on bearing a child They've all got a similar goal but vastly different motivations ranging from drug addiction to death to motherhoodRead it in two days and would like another please


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10 thoughts on “Viscera

  1. Bogi Takács Bogi Takács says:

    I think I have found the sleeper hit of 2016 and it is full of guts LiterallyViscera is a dark fantasy novel – wait a body horror novel – does it count as horrific if it is presented as “just the way we do things”? – a sword sorcery satire – a — wait what? clears throat Viscera is a novel that’s hard to categorize But it certainly contains visceraRead the rest on Bogi Reads the World

  2. Zazu Zazu says:

    There are some stories that rarely get told Viscera is not only a rarely told—and sorely needed—story it is also an exuisite amalgamation of heart wrenching truths and singularly eccentric fictionsA motley crew is assembled on a journey thrown together by mere chance as life so often has it the unkillable Ashlan whose torn out guts or poison filled veins just keep regenerating anew; Rafe a wandering junkie with chest pains that hint at deeper secrets; the sinister walking talking cloth puppet Hollis; and the inscrutable Tanka a delightfully outlandish mix of nature goddess and mad frankenstein esue biologist Colorful characters though they may be their feelings and motivations betray their humanity They are indeed just like us flawed people with painful secrets they are each in their own ways trying to escapeThere is little else that can be told of the story or characters without spoiling the excellent build up slow reveal and breath taking twists The hard truths these characters must face about their own identities and pasts are peeled back slowly and painfully over the course of their uest and as they get closer and closer to an end goal they themselves could never expect Though initially shockingly gruesome their literal eviscerations and physical wounds serve a powerful metaphorical purpose Suailia’s use of literal viscera blood and intestines tendons and bone allegorically matches her deep exploration of identity issues We cannot live without our guts; we cannot truly live without acknowledging the truth about our very soulsSo often books with characters outside the default straight cis white narrative are relegated to positions of lesser influence The publishing industry often classifies these stories as “special interest” and critics so often give negative feedback due to being unable “relate” to their characters It is extraordinarily refreshing to read a book featuring characters and issues that are so often left unmentioned or unnoticed yet a book that is not marketed as an “issues” story Instead Viscera is a fun vibrant romp through an imaginative landscape populated by uniuely weird people who yet feel for so many reasons viscerally real and yes relatableIn Viscera Suailia shows us that sometimes the best way to speak our most uniue truths is to use unconventional fictions And regardless of how far any of us may be from living as our most authentic selves we may be comforted by the wise words one of the protagonists leaves us with claiming they are true of every soul “How they tried how long how hard they tried”

  3. Kaa Kaa says:

    So first of all it's important to know that this is a book filled with blood and guts and death There's lots of gore lots of trauma and lots of violence There's anti trans and anti ueer violence and threats It addresses addiction and suicidality While it's written in a very matter of fact way that makes these things at least for me easier to read about there's still a lot of darkness in this book But there's also a lot of humor and in the end a lot of hope A gorgeously written wonderfully creepy story

  4. Cameron Sant Cameron Sant says:

    THIS BOOK IS VERY GOOD AND VERY CREATIVE but it is not for me If I rated it based on uality I'd give it a 4 or a 5This is a dark fantasy about an immortal woman who produces most of the book's gore who falls in with a puppet made of guts The other main character is a trans man drug addict who has fallen in with a group of addicts who kill for drugs and worship Lady Luck Rich fun world building which was my favorite part of the book The city the story revolves around is built on the bodies of dead gods who cause earthuakes when too many people have diedI felt the characterization of the two main characters is also very good and thoughtful and the minor characters are very uniue and uirky TW Gore gore gore Creative uses of gore and like that's the book Escalating gore creativity Death I read an interview where the writer who is a trans woman said this book is based on things she finds scary as a trans person so like lots of trans specific trauma misgendering anti trans murders naked trans reveals etc most of it centered on a trans man He struggles to keep a binder on most of the book for various reasons which is a trigger I didn't know I had Drugs that involve getting stung by beetles Drug addicts feature prominently People held captive and having experiments performed on them against their will There's probably I can't remember

  5. Tatiana Tatiana says:

    I thought I had marked this on my Goodreads when I started but I guess notThis was a very interesting read and very difficult for me to describe what exactly it's about But it's considered a fantasy novel and it's a really uniue way to engage the genre If there were fantasy novels like this I think I'd get back into reading it for sure

  6. Isaac R. Fellman Isaac R. Fellman says:

    A dazzler Wildly adventurous and experimental and yet it plays perfectly within its self created rules — like a chessboard with only knights Suailia gives us a rich cast of beautiful dirtbags characters who don’t remotely try to ingratiate themselves but who nonetheless make me wish I could spend a lot time with them and to be honest I never have that feeling these days Absurdly powerful reverent and irreverent whenever it’s right to be so and one of the finest SFF novels I’ve ever read

  7. Renay Renay says:

    Body horror gets in the way of my emotional connection to stories I guess? The writing was so lush and good though that I'm sad I didn't like it

  8. Lulu (the library leopard) Lulu (the library leopard) says:

    35Really weird uniue though sometimes I had a bit of a hard time keep tracking of stuff Hopefully a longer review to come because this book was doing some really interesting things

  9. Michael Hitchcock Michael Hitchcock says:

    I'm tempted to just say writing VISCERA took a lot of GUTS get it? and leave it there Because guts are intimate and messy and confusing when you've got them all splayed out the temptation is to just let them speak for themselves But I do want to talk about a few of the things in these guts I found worthyViscera was sort of a strangely constructed story The two main characters Rafe and Ashlan had almost the same journey though neither really helped or were even fully aware of one another's struggles or goals But both characters were disturbed people who found peace by embracing their transformation creatingaccepting a new family for themselves and reconciling themselves with the spiritual practices of their birthIt's funny that in a story with a luck worshipping drug addled murder cult killer gut filled robots and dead but lingering Gods the actual plot feels that straightforward and earnest to me but that's what I felt was important here You might be in it for the magic and battles and witty dialogue but I'm looking at the guts and trying to make sense of themThe fact that the two main characters had such a faithful reflection of one another's journey towards peace I felt very strongly that Suaillia was trying to get us to see the eternal universal struggle with identity change family and faith that all individuals must takeBut this wasn't a difference erasing EVERYONE IS THE SAME kind of message In fact the main antagonist was motivated by that very type of ethos To the contrary in Viscera Suaillia went in the other direction using this established universal struggle to highlight the specific differences of the struggles their characters had and how their specific identities and situations shaped and intensified that universal struggleEven though the crosswise or trans or non binary or etc seemed perhaps prevalent in this world than ours they faced a similarly severe reaction from the culture at large existing only in the liminal spaces they could find unoccupied and unseen Within these spaces they may have been able to live freely but outside was a world in which they must remain closeted or risk meeting harassment or a sudden and traumatic endingThis leads me to the most emotionally affecting part of the story for me which in an interesting parallel with their first novel is also a tragic death told in a flashback a good way through the novel that adds a lot of context to how the character got the way they wereIn this case it was Rafe's partner and major influenceintroduction into the world of the crosswise Gingerbeard Their tragic senseless death explained so well how Rafe became a drug addicted assassin cultistBut none of that would have meant anything had Suaillia not already gotten us on Rafe's side with the way they introduced and revealed him It was brave and magical to write from the drug addict's point of view and give him a voice For whatever reason in our culture they are one of the groups of people it's ok to treat as less than human But Suaillia wrote him so faithfully that by the time it was revealed he was biologically a woman we were able to be in a place to reject the gender of their birth as thoroughly as they themselves do And since trans people are widely considered socially on par with addicts as non humans unworthy of respect I found it amazing that our point of view was so tightly and sympathetically tied to theirsBut this book wasn't all transgressive politics or whatever it was full of witty dialogue and interesting relationships over the backdrop of a repressive culture ruling over a landscape of endless professional war and drawing on the power of the remnants of long dead Gods In fact I think one could read the whole thing without getting hung up on the identity politics of itThe swift skeleton of it was the plot basically an extended barter between a bunch of characters who mostly don't really care about one another but who all have what another character so desperately needs The handsome pretty flesh of it was the colorful cast and the decaying background and the repressive toppling government but the guts of it the part I wanted to think about because they were what the book was presumably named after was the transformation; the courage it took to embrace transformationWe can't recognize how we're all different until we understand the ways we are all the same but we can't see how we're all the same until we start to embrace the differences This book brought us into intimate contact with people who exist on that boundary all the time who are both exactly the same as us and at the same time wildly different Suaillia gave us deeper glimpse into that specific difference even though their differences were of a kind people are less likely to be accepting of and they gave us this glimpse in enough of a sympathetic way that we could love the characters the way we love ourselves honestly and without that pathological need to uncritically accept every single thing about themThey wrote a moral novel across the background setting of an amoral world A funhouse world that was amoral in many of the ways our own world is amoral With the speedy feel of the book and all the subtle nods to current real world practices and institutions and above all with the dead but still powerful persistent remnants of the Gods Suaillia made a great statement for these characters self directedsoul directed morality taking the good and great from the old ways In our world and in the world of the story that takes some guts and is still somehow controversial even as so many millions already live that wayBut I will reiterate one thing and close with one thing I never mentioned at all First the novel is fun and has a lot of elements of the weird and fantastic and does not need to be read into the way I did and could be enjoyed very well even only on a surface level And finally I want you to know I could be wrong about all of this I could have brought it all into my reading of the novel where it didn't belong In ancient Rome and Etrusca there were diviners called the haruspex and their entire job was to look at the splayed out guts of sanctified animals and read therein the future These diviners tell a complicated story from a heap of viscera and a different diviner would see a totally different story in the same pile of guts and that's just how things are sometimes

  10. Lara Donnelly Lara Donnelly says:

    Weird and wonderful and beautifully disgusting Viscera belongs on your shelf between China Miéville and David Edison Suailia uses body horror to talk about body politics in a way that hurts just as much as a knife to the gut And she sprinkles it all with a strange combination of steampunk sci fi and high fantasyThis book has brings together a sadistic talking doll a snarky superhealer who just wants to die a one armed snaggle toothed con artist a trans man assassin from a long line clan of corpse cleaning priests and a witch without a womb hell bent on bearing a child They've all got a similar goal but vastly different motivations ranging from drug addiction to death to motherhoodRead it in two days and would like another please

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