Anne Boleyn in London PDF ¶ Anne Boleyn PDF/EPUB ²

Anne Boleyn in London PDF ¶ Anne Boleyn PDF/EPUB ²



10 thoughts on “Anne Boleyn in London

  1. Olga Miret Olga Miret says:

    Plenty of information on the court and the London of the era and a balanced view of Anne’s historical figure Thanks to Pen Sword for providing me with a copy of this book that I freely choose to reviewI have recently read a number of books about the Tudor era mostly historical fiction novels and I was intrigued to see what this book might offerThe author has researched the topic well and discusses what London was like in Anne Boleyn’s time and describes the changes that not only London but also the rest of England experienced during this time and in some cases later Even if those changes were not directly influenced by Anne’s role it is clear that this was a momentous time for British history and Anne’s history is inextricably linked to them Although London was not as important internationally as other cities at the time Paris for instance it was the seat of power and influence of the kingdom Most important people would have a residence in London at the time and the book mentions the different properties the king had in the city and surrounding area and how those were renovated or abandoned according to the needs of the period The fact that Anne’s family didn’t have a house in London is remarkable considering the ambition Thomas Boleyn had for himself and his children As we know that didn’t stop him but perhaps meant that he had not as many allies in the capital as he would have wishedI was fascinated by the accounts of the never ending moves of the court from residence to residence due to sanitation and problems with the water supply no single place could accommodate the king and his entourage for lengthy periods of time and once they left the cleaning process would start again by the way in which properties and alliances swapped and changed hands the ueen is Dead God Save the ueen indeed as most of the women who had been ladies in waiting of one of the ueens would end up serving the next one or even several in a row whatever their personal sympathies or feelings might have been And of course everybody would hope to get their hands on the property and positions of those now out of favour with the king and by details such as how expensive it could be to be called to court as you had to adjust your dress carriages etc to the reuirements but also profitable if you managed to advance your position and you played your cards right Some of the historical figures were remarkably resilient and managed to survive changes and whims although those closest to the king were at highest risk We learn about the roles of the different Lords and Ladies at the King and ueen’s service we hear about the strict rules on hygiene we learn about illnesses and mishapsThe book does not go into detailed descriptions of places or events but manages to recreate the atmosphere of the era and gives a good indication of the politics and how the different factions played against each other The author suggests that to be successful and to survive close to the king one needed to know how to move and behave both in London and in court Anne was very familiar with the court’s inner workings she’d been educated in the courts of Austria and France from a very young age but due to her time away and to her birthplace she didn’t know London well Cromwell knew the ins and outs of London and was very good at managing the crowds getting money for coronations and other events gathering information but was not so adept at the ins and outs of court Ultimately Henry VIII’s main interest seems to have been to please himself and if somebody stopped being useful or interesting to him there were plenty of others happy to take their place and try their luckChapman tries to provide an objective and even handed view of Anne’s historical figure not adopting sides or taking us on any flights of fancy She uotes the sources for comments anecdotes and stories about the ueen always documenting how much weight we can set by them because much of what has been written about Anne dates from years or centuries after her demise and it was penned by people who did not know her Even the people who were documenting the events as they occurred tend to be either pro or against Anne rather than neutral observers and there is little doubt their accounts are coloured by their loyalty and feelings When possible the author provides than one source or interpretation on the events and her sources will be of interest to anybody looking to make their own minds up although in my opinion the book provides a balanced accountThe early chapters flow better and this is perhaps because the chapters seem to be designed to work if read separately providing enough background and references to each period of Anne’s life A reader who goes through the whole book in a relatively short period of time is bound to notice some repetitions For example discussions as to when the court became aware that Anne was pregnant or descriptions of the chambers of the king and ueen appear in than one chapter Despite that I enjoyed learning how the court was organised and the roles others who were not of noble blood played in keeping everything running smoothlyThe last chapter makes a point of updating us on the changes to the properties of the period that have survived to this day I had to chuckle at the comments about the re Tudorisation of uite a few buildings in the Victorian Era the Tower of London Hampton Court and Windsor in particularThis book is a good resource for people who are interested in the history behind the figure and are looking for an even handed summary and account of the events It will also be of interest to those who want to learn about the society of the time and how it worked It offers factual information such as it exists and allows us to put into context some of the stories and legends that circulate about Anne to this day It might be too basic for those who’ve read extensively on the subject but will be a great addition to those who love the period and are looking for reliable data presented in an easy to read and engaging mannerAs an aside I had access to a hardback copy and it contains black and white pictures that go from drawings of London and supposed portraits to modern day reminders of Anne's figure


  2. Kara Kara says:

    An excellent biography of Anne Boleyn digging into details of life around her the people high and low the politics the everyday life and the architecture Despite the depth its written in an easy to read breezy style casually taking pot shots at various lurid writers and biased historians calling out bs and misogyny or just plain stupidity which was awesome


  3. Linda Linda says:

    Since I've read nearly everything there is to read on the Tudor's I didn't think this book could offer anything new and yet I was pleasantly surprised A condensed version of the life and death of Anne Boleyn it was still a fascinating read with a lot of extras about London at the time


  4. Brooke Brooke says:

    Thanks to Pen Sword for the review copyAt just over 230 pages this concise book manages to cover everything from the sights and sounds of Tudor London to the daily lives of Tudor courtiers and from the story of Henry VIII's and Anne Boleyn's and their relatives' lives to their impact on modern popular culture and tourism Although the action necessarily wanders away from London from time to time Chapman makes it clear that Anne's rise and fall took place in a heavily London context a fact which I feel is often forgotten in favor of the secluded at the time sites of Hampton Court and Greenwich Chapman is careful to avoid definitive statements when it comes to the gossip surrounding Anne and notes which sources may be biased and which events are recorded in multiple yet differing ways If you've read a lot about the Tudors you will likely be familiar with most of the material but still find this book to be enjoyable thanks to it being neither speculative historical fiction nor simply another straightforward biography Some of the writing was repetitive but Chapman does offer one of the best summaries I've seen of Henry VIII's modus operandi But then Henry never allowed consistency to get in the way of what he wanted


  5. Hanna (lapetiteboleyn) Hanna (lapetiteboleyn) says:

    This had the potential to be a genuinely interesting and insightful biography of an extraordinary woman who over the space of five hundred years has lost none of her ability to fascinate Unfortunately it needed to be about a hundred pages shorter I freuently found myself suffering déjà vu as I reread arguments for the second or third time complete with the same joke I also felt a real opportunity was missed to offer insight into the current phenomena of an international obsession with Anne and instead it was glossed over in a couple of pages of complaints about the number of twitter accounts using variants of Anne's name and the Christmas tree decorations available a side note the Christmas decorations are brought up than three times I want to offer my condolences to Chapman who seems to have a very real problem with them Given that she herself is a woman marketing a book about Anne Boleyn her snide comments in the last chapter all feel very bitter and unnecessary


  6. Helene Harrison Helene Harrison says:

    Review I wouldn't call this book so much a look at Anne Boleyn in London but a historical biography of Anne Boleyn focused on her time in London from 1522 and her first court appearance to her death in 1536 It has obviously been well researched and there is plenty of reference to the primary sources as well as to how reliable they may be and cross referencing different sources There is a short look at Anne's earlier life but it focused on what we know about her later life I was expecting about Anne's involvement in different London locations like Whitehall Westminster Hampton Court Hatfield Eltham Greenwich and Richmond but this part I felt was a little lackingGeneral Subjects? History Biography TudorsRecommend? – YesRating 1620


  7. Mrs S Ruck Mrs S Ruck says:

    ExcellentWonderful background to the timeof Anne I felt it covered a background of London as it was around Anne's time


  8. Bits_fearietales Bits_fearietales says:

    Review to come


  9. Laura Laura says:

    Review from blog


  10. Mich Must Read Mich Must Read says:

    There are many books movies and TV shows now about Anne Boleyn or King Henry VIII So we all have some knowledge of their lives to a certain degree But lets face it the reason why we seem to keep looking into it is because it’s an epic soap opera I think when we examine Anne Boleyn we see her in the lens of those who wrote history and in this case it’s colored in rumors; It’s hard to decide what it true and what is not Anne Boleynn in London is not just a bunch of historical catty courtiers or religious leaders achieving political agendas using heresy or rumors Every aspect of Tudor life is examined including rumors therefore giving a better context to place some of what was reported about Anne This book has detailed workings of everyday life in the Tudor era Anne’s early life her family and where she came from and many of the influential people that she interacted with This also includes the ordinary citizen not just royalty and the upper crust of society Great pains are made to describe the people in their cultural context For instance The riots of Evil May Day and the inter woven superstructure of the church and government are laid out so the reader might fully understand the mind set of individuals at the time This helps us to understand perhaps the reasoning of King Henry and his distrust of the city of LondonThere is a dizzying amount of information in here but the author is able to thread it in a way that is mesmerizing The impact of sumptuary laws and how they impact everyday society is covered and seems to be a big theme Certain people can only wear certain colors and certain pieces of clothing Everything you wore and did was a reflection of where you stood in society This is even imperative in court life which is covered here The Inner workings of court and the daily life of Courtiers This also includes the king and ueen and some of the rituals that they were to have been prescribed For instance the maternity rituals for the ueen are almost bizarre The ueen was basically in solitary confinement or away from men prior to and after birth The later because she needed to “purify” herself after the ordeal of childbirth This is one of those books that you savor I did not want it to end simply because I felt I was in Tudor England This is what I really want from a history book which is a very tall order Lissa Chapman creates a visual sensation from the very first page that plops you down like a child for story time mode I loved this I look forward to seeing what else she publishesmichmustreadcom


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Anne Boleyn in London ❴Reading❵ ➾ Anne Boleyn in London Author Lissa Chapman – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Romantic victim Ruthless other woman Innocent pawn Religious reformer Fool flirt and adulteress Politician Witch During her life Anne Boleyn Henry VIII s ill fated second ueen was internationally famo Romantic victim Ruthless other woman Innocent pawn Religious reformer Fool flirt and adulteress Politician Witch During her Anne Boleyn PDF/EPUB ² life Anne Boleyn Henry VIII s ill fated second ueen was internationally famous or notorious; today she still attracts passionate adherents and furious detractors It was in London that most of the drama of Anne Boleyn s life and death was played out most famously in the Tower of London the scene of her coronation celebrations of her trial and execution and where her body lies buried Londoners like everyone else clearly had strong feelings about her and in her few years as a public figure Anne Boleyn was influential as a patron of the arts and of French taste as the center of a religious and intellectual circle and for her purchasing power both directly and as a leader of fashion It was primarily to London beyond the immediate circle of the court that her carefully 'spun' image as ueen was directed during the public celebrations surrounding her coronation In the centuries since Anne Boleyn s death her reputation has expanded to give her an almost mythical status in London inspiring everything from pub names to music hall songs and novels to merchandise including pin cushions with removable heads And now there is a thriving online community surrounding her there are over fifty Twitter accounts using some version of her nameThis book looks at the evidence both for the effect London and its people had on the course of Anne Boleyn s life and death and the effects she had and continues to have on them.

10 thoughts on “Anne Boleyn in London

  1. Olga Miret Olga Miret says:

    Plenty of information on the court and the London of the era and a balanced view of Anne’s historical figure Thanks to Pen Sword for providing me with a copy of this book that I freely choose to reviewI have recently read a number of books about the Tudor era mostly historical fiction novels and I was intrigued to see what this book might offerThe author has researched the topic well and discusses what London was like in Anne Boleyn’s time and describes the changes that not only London but also the rest of England experienced during this time and in some cases later Even if those changes were not directly influenced by Anne’s role it is clear that this was a momentous time for British history and Anne’s history is inextricably linked to them Although London was not as important internationally as other cities at the time Paris for instance it was the seat of power and influence of the kingdom Most important people would have a residence in London at the time and the book mentions the different properties the king had in the city and surrounding area and how those were renovated or abandoned according to the needs of the period The fact that Anne’s family didn’t have a house in London is remarkable considering the ambition Thomas Boleyn had for himself and his children As we know that didn’t stop him but perhaps meant that he had not as many allies in the capital as he would have wishedI was fascinated by the accounts of the never ending moves of the court from residence to residence due to sanitation and problems with the water supply no single place could accommodate the king and his entourage for lengthy periods of time and once they left the cleaning process would start again by the way in which properties and alliances swapped and changed hands the ueen is Dead God Save the ueen indeed as most of the women who had been ladies in waiting of one of the ueens would end up serving the next one or even several in a row whatever their personal sympathies or feelings might have been And of course everybody would hope to get their hands on the property and positions of those now out of favour with the king and by details such as how expensive it could be to be called to court as you had to adjust your dress carriages etc to the reuirements but also profitable if you managed to advance your position and you played your cards right Some of the historical figures were remarkably resilient and managed to survive changes and whims although those closest to the king were at highest risk We learn about the roles of the different Lords and Ladies at the King and ueen’s service we hear about the strict rules on hygiene we learn about illnesses and mishapsThe book does not go into detailed descriptions of places or events but manages to recreate the atmosphere of the era and gives a good indication of the politics and how the different factions played against each other The author suggests that to be successful and to survive close to the king one needed to know how to move and behave both in London and in court Anne was very familiar with the court’s inner workings she’d been educated in the courts of Austria and France from a very young age but due to her time away and to her birthplace she didn’t know London well Cromwell knew the ins and outs of London and was very good at managing the crowds getting money for coronations and other events gathering information but was not so adept at the ins and outs of court Ultimately Henry VIII’s main interest seems to have been to please himself and if somebody stopped being useful or interesting to him there were plenty of others happy to take their place and try their luckChapman tries to provide an objective and even handed view of Anne’s historical figure not adopting sides or taking us on any flights of fancy She uotes the sources for comments anecdotes and stories about the ueen always documenting how much weight we can set by them because much of what has been written about Anne dates from years or centuries after her demise and it was penned by people who did not know her Even the people who were documenting the events as they occurred tend to be either pro or against Anne rather than neutral observers and there is little doubt their accounts are coloured by their loyalty and feelings When possible the author provides than one source or interpretation on the events and her sources will be of interest to anybody looking to make their own minds up although in my opinion the book provides a balanced accountThe early chapters flow better and this is perhaps because the chapters seem to be designed to work if read separately providing enough background and references to each period of Anne’s life A reader who goes through the whole book in a relatively short period of time is bound to notice some repetitions For example discussions as to when the court became aware that Anne was pregnant or descriptions of the chambers of the king and ueen appear in than one chapter Despite that I enjoyed learning how the court was organised and the roles others who were not of noble blood played in keeping everything running smoothlyThe last chapter makes a point of updating us on the changes to the properties of the period that have survived to this day I had to chuckle at the comments about the re Tudorisation of uite a few buildings in the Victorian Era the Tower of London Hampton Court and Windsor in particularThis book is a good resource for people who are interested in the history behind the figure and are looking for an even handed summary and account of the events It will also be of interest to those who want to learn about the society of the time and how it worked It offers factual information such as it exists and allows us to put into context some of the stories and legends that circulate about Anne to this day It might be too basic for those who’ve read extensively on the subject but will be a great addition to those who love the period and are looking for reliable data presented in an easy to read and engaging mannerAs an aside I had access to a hardback copy and it contains black and white pictures that go from drawings of London and supposed portraits to modern day reminders of Anne's figure

  2. Kara Kara says:

    An excellent biography of Anne Boleyn digging into details of life around her the people high and low the politics the everyday life and the architecture Despite the depth its written in an easy to read breezy style casually taking pot shots at various lurid writers and biased historians calling out bs and misogyny or just plain stupidity which was awesome

  3. Linda Linda says:

    Since I've read nearly everything there is to read on the Tudor's I didn't think this book could offer anything new and yet I was pleasantly surprised A condensed version of the life and death of Anne Boleyn it was still a fascinating read with a lot of extras about London at the time

  4. Brooke Brooke says:

    Thanks to Pen Sword for the review copyAt just over 230 pages this concise book manages to cover everything from the sights and sounds of Tudor London to the daily lives of Tudor courtiers and from the story of Henry VIII's and Anne Boleyn's and their relatives' lives to their impact on modern popular culture and tourism Although the action necessarily wanders away from London from time to time Chapman makes it clear that Anne's rise and fall took place in a heavily London context a fact which I feel is often forgotten in favor of the secluded at the time sites of Hampton Court and Greenwich Chapman is careful to avoid definitive statements when it comes to the gossip surrounding Anne and notes which sources may be biased and which events are recorded in multiple yet differing ways If you've read a lot about the Tudors you will likely be familiar with most of the material but still find this book to be enjoyable thanks to it being neither speculative historical fiction nor simply another straightforward biography Some of the writing was repetitive but Chapman does offer one of the best summaries I've seen of Henry VIII's modus operandi But then Henry never allowed consistency to get in the way of what he wanted

  5. Hanna (lapetiteboleyn) Hanna (lapetiteboleyn) says:

    This had the potential to be a genuinely interesting and insightful biography of an extraordinary woman who over the space of five hundred years has lost none of her ability to fascinate Unfortunately it needed to be about a hundred pages shorter I freuently found myself suffering déjà vu as I reread arguments for the second or third time complete with the same joke I also felt a real opportunity was missed to offer insight into the current phenomena of an international obsession with Anne and instead it was glossed over in a couple of pages of complaints about the number of twitter accounts using variants of Anne's name and the Christmas tree decorations available a side note the Christmas decorations are brought up than three times I want to offer my condolences to Chapman who seems to have a very real problem with them Given that she herself is a woman marketing a book about Anne Boleyn her snide comments in the last chapter all feel very bitter and unnecessary

  6. Helene Harrison Helene Harrison says:

    Review I wouldn't call this book so much a look at Anne Boleyn in London but a historical biography of Anne Boleyn focused on her time in London from 1522 and her first court appearance to her death in 1536 It has obviously been well researched and there is plenty of reference to the primary sources as well as to how reliable they may be and cross referencing different sources There is a short look at Anne's earlier life but it focused on what we know about her later life I was expecting about Anne's involvement in different London locations like Whitehall Westminster Hampton Court Hatfield Eltham Greenwich and Richmond but this part I felt was a little lackingGeneral Subjects? History Biography TudorsRecommend? – YesRating 1620

  7. Mrs S Ruck Mrs S Ruck says:

    ExcellentWonderful background to the timeof Anne I felt it covered a background of London as it was around Anne's time

  8. Bits_fearietales Bits_fearietales says:

    Review to come

  9. Laura Laura says:

    Review from blog

  10. Mich Must Read Mich Must Read says:

    There are many books movies and TV shows now about Anne Boleyn or King Henry VIII So we all have some knowledge of their lives to a certain degree But lets face it the reason why we seem to keep looking into it is because it’s an epic soap opera I think when we examine Anne Boleyn we see her in the lens of those who wrote history and in this case it’s colored in rumors; It’s hard to decide what it true and what is not Anne Boleynn in London is not just a bunch of historical catty courtiers or religious leaders achieving political agendas using heresy or rumors Every aspect of Tudor life is examined including rumors therefore giving a better context to place some of what was reported about Anne This book has detailed workings of everyday life in the Tudor era Anne’s early life her family and where she came from and many of the influential people that she interacted with This also includes the ordinary citizen not just royalty and the upper crust of society Great pains are made to describe the people in their cultural context For instance The riots of Evil May Day and the inter woven superstructure of the church and government are laid out so the reader might fully understand the mind set of individuals at the time This helps us to understand perhaps the reasoning of King Henry and his distrust of the city of LondonThere is a dizzying amount of information in here but the author is able to thread it in a way that is mesmerizing The impact of sumptuary laws and how they impact everyday society is covered and seems to be a big theme Certain people can only wear certain colors and certain pieces of clothing Everything you wore and did was a reflection of where you stood in society This is even imperative in court life which is covered here The Inner workings of court and the daily life of Courtiers This also includes the king and ueen and some of the rituals that they were to have been prescribed For instance the maternity rituals for the ueen are almost bizarre The ueen was basically in solitary confinement or away from men prior to and after birth The later because she needed to “purify” herself after the ordeal of childbirth This is one of those books that you savor I did not want it to end simply because I felt I was in Tudor England This is what I really want from a history book which is a very tall order Lissa Chapman creates a visual sensation from the very first page that plops you down like a child for story time mode I loved this I look forward to seeing what else she publishesmichmustreadcom

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