Waiting for the Cyclone eBook ☆ Waiting for MOBI

Waiting for the Cyclone eBook ☆ Waiting for MOBI


Waiting for the Cyclone [EPUB] ✸ Waiting for the Cyclone ✽ Leesa Dean – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk In the realm of fiction women are too often cast as inherently good—typically kind always considerate and traditionally in possession of high morals Not so in the audacious stories of Waiting for th In the realm of fiction women are too often cast as inherently good—typically kind always considerate and traditionally in possession of high morals Not so in the audacious stories of Waiting for the Waiting for MOBI :Þ Cyclone Debbie a seemingly perfect mother shoots pharmaceuticals at night and Donna lies to her family about volunteering in Afghanistan so she can parasail in Turkey There’s also Alison who wakes up in bed with a tattooed Mexican man instead of the less interesting man who brought her on vacation her husband These women and a dozen others don’t need to be liked and are not compelled to make apologies These women are perfectly imperfect A collection of short stories that behaves much like the weather pattern it was named for Waiting for the Cyclone is at times fast and reckless and at others calm yet under high pressure A powerful literary debut from one of Canada’s most promising young writers.

  • Paperback
  • 224 pages
  • Waiting for the Cyclone
  • Leesa Dean
  • 01 November 2016
  • 9781927366509

About the Author: Leesa Dean

Leesa Dean is a Creative Writing professor at Selkirk College in Nelson British Columbia Canada When she's not teaching or writing she could be doing a number of things such as learning banjo Waiting for MOBI :Þ fantasizing about living in a boat organizing literary festivals driving on gnarly logging roads to camp somewhere unbelievable fishing or listening to records at home Author photo by Ayelet Tsabari.



10 thoughts on “Waiting for the Cyclone

  1. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    The thirteen stories in Leesa Dean’s vibrant Waiting for the Cyclone range across the Americas depicting unconventional characters who long for meaningful connections and temporary escapes from disappointing realities Most of the stories begin in Canada but travel—if only through flashbacks—to the USA or Latin America Other countries symbolize the fleeting chance to escape ordinary life while snippets of Spanish and French flavor many stories with the diversity of the North American experience Motherhood especially mothers sought and lost is another robust elementSee my full review at Foreword

  2. BookCupid BookCupid says:

    Believe it or not I actually lost this book and found it recently Hence the reading time lapse The book promised us imperfect women and I for one am glad Dean wrote them in such a way It didn't take lots of pages to reveal that most women lived with scars from past memories An ex who left them and came back with plane tickets mom leaving home hooking up with a stranger this all pretty much sounds like my life now that I think of itAll in all an interesting short stories collection that will remind you of your own past wounds and give you the desire to let go of the past and just look forward

  3. Vic Cavalli Vic Cavalli says:

    Leesa Dean is a young writer with genuine promise I like good sentences and there are a lot of them in this collectionEarly in the first story “Waiting for the Cyclone” we read “He kissed the top of my head and lingered there as if he might forget the smell of my hair once I was gone” 2 Beautifully stated and accurate to male experience And a bit further on the narrator says “Michael put his hand between my thighs I tightened my muscles to keep it there” 6 Again accurate The 12 year old narrator of “Malad” says “The rat’s name was Sid like the singer from the Sex Pistols” 18 which is a carefully nuanced allusion on Dean’s part as she shows the child’s innocence in this error Sid Vicious was their bass player who tragically died of a heroin overdose and Johnny Rotten was their singer Deeper into the story we learn of the mesuite trees that “Sometimes have to dig their roots a hundred feet for water they’re determined to survive” and this beneath “the night sky all lit up with stars a star forest” 20 And the same young narrator notices that “Her eyes looked fake and shiny like the clear rocks at the bottom of auariums” 21In “Tiebreaker” we read “Columbia Lake was the colour of laundry detergent” 37 A strikingly simple complex imageIn “Proverbs” Dean effectively shows the patterns of pain inherent in infidelity She evokes the setting as Amy “drops her backpack on the furthest bench where a local teenager has scratched RURAL TORTURE into the paint” 68 Soon we see “A wide veranda laced by dark foliage” 69 and learn that Amy was at one time “in a choir” 73 which hints at her eroded spiritual emotional foundation As Amy begins to bond with her cabin mate Michelle “The mountains are pink edged and the sky is reminiscent of its former blue” 75 As they become closer the narrator notes “It could be a ritual the two of them writing letters to their faraway men by candlelight” 76 And in the beautifully handled climax of the story “Amy sits close and talks to Michelle in a voice that sounds like a soft ocean While in the distance the ripe eggplants pull toward the ground and the tomatoes stand out bright red in a sea of green” 91In “One Last Time” we read “When I could no longer be good and let you sleep I slid my hand across your stomach knowing you’d wake up and make love to me once twice”126 The author never describes these sexual experiences This level of minimalist restraint pervades all of the stories Dean’s strategy invites the reader to visualize and it also creates the sense that the narratives especially when they deal with sexuality are rushed summaries of what happened For me this is odd but also effective The setting in “One Last Time” echoes this pattern of uick undeveloped touching intimacy when we learn that “Irrigation sprinklers ticked in wide arcs leaving tiny rainbows over the parched grass” 129 A beautiful sentence like a line lifted from a poem The intimate scenes are luminous uickly fadingAnd in “September” we read “That night the sunset over Lake Superior nearly destroyed me The bright pink sky burst into the car and seemed to hug me It felt like love and I couldn’t stop crying” 132 Throughout the collection there are hints of spirituality lost of a numb unease and meaninglessness undergirding the attempts at intimate relationships It is as if the narrator is often trying to be tough and put on an insensitive façade while deep inside she is crying out to be “destroyed” with “love” A good example is in “Monterrico” where we read “They’d only been together six months when she found out she was pregnant Not that she wanted to keep it but she still felt something when the blue line surfaced on the test” 164 The characters seem to be on the edge of an abyss There’s to say about this And in “Gone to Seed” pregnant Erika cries as she hears how good it is that she has “a wonderful husband who will be with her every step of the way” 189 which of course is not true but rather her deepest yearningIn the final story “Shelter from the Wind” Dean continues to explore the themes of conception pregnancy and solitude “Chelsea sees the grainy ultrasound which showed everything—fingers and toes the shape of the face” 192 and then “Just before midnight the city’s north end lost power Patrick lit a candle a vigil for his lost opportunity A marmalade glow emanated from the wick” 193 Soon after this scene Chelsea flashes back and we read this beautiful description of the conception of her child with Marco “They left their clothes on the shore and made love in a shallow bay sand clouding around Chelsea’s knees as she straddled Marco In the distance two flamingos stood near the shore with their backs turned elegantly facing the sun” 197 Wonderful writing This is my favorite story in the collection and I won’t say Read it; it’s really goodFreuently in fact very freuently in Waiting for the Cyclone Leesa Dean’s stories “pull toward the ground” and “stand out”—and that’s a good way to begin one’s publication career as a writer

  4. Norman Feliks Jezioranski Norman Feliks Jezioranski says:

    You can read my review on the Broken Pencil website

  5. Kevin Hogg Kevin Hogg says:

    A very interesting collection of short stories linked by an intriguing theme of women who are true to themselves often in the face of society's expectations They are generally self reliant and confident but their outlooks on life vary widely from compassionate to hedonistic Freuently unpredictable twists and a generous helping of heartbreak make their experiences resonate with the readerI wanted to pick out a few favourites but it's tough The gradual revelations of backstory and the uniue situations the characters find themselves in make for memorable moments in each At times the reader gets a hint of the ending but even when the prediction is correct it comes with enough complication in the way to maintain uncertainty often right until the final sentenceIf I had to choose three I enjoyed the interactions and self reflection in Proverbs the sense of freedom and lingering hope in September and the complicated relationships of Shelter from the Storm However the entire book is filled with some great writing and standout sentences often finding creative and poignant ways to express the small details of relationships and daily life

  6. Laurie Siblock Laurie Siblock says:

    This book of short stories is full of relatable people and life details; the characters are complex and very human and there is insight delivered in subtle poignant moments I highly recommend this book

  7. Becky Becky says:

    I'm not in the habit of rating books by friends but I will say that this collection by Leesa Dean is a fantastic read More than the sum of its stories the collection pulled me along from one tale to the next The gusting and gutsy force propelling me through Waiting for the Cyclone's pages was the strength of Leesa's storm weathered characters women from across Canada facing turbulent times as they travel search for love drink too much and make mistakes Each character felt like a fully imagined woman that I have either been or known or a woman I've been friends or enemies with Leesa's stories are beautifully written and they cover a lot of ground geographically and emotionally I highly recommend joining her characters for a road trip

  8. Frances Frances says:

    I haven't read a book of short stories in a few years and so the timing of this book as a gift was perfect Each story features a female in various situations I enjoyed all of them for their realism and character development Even though they were short stories I felt a connection to many of the characters and their lives I really enjoyed this book

  9. Delia Delia says:

    What a wonderful collection of characters many of whom will stay with me for some time to come They are the kind of stories that will come to me later I will have to remember whether I read it or whether it was recounted to me by someone who was there

  10. Jen Jen says:

    I'm not a big short story reader but this was recommended to me Wow each one was good Each female main character was real imperfect flawed and relatable I highly recommend this if you are looking for strong and genuine female characters

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10 thoughts on “Waiting for the Cyclone

  1. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    The thirteen stories in Leesa Dean’s vibrant Waiting for the Cyclone range across the Americas depicting unconventional characters who long for meaningful connections and temporary escapes from disappointing realities Most of the stories begin in Canada but travel—if only through flashbacks—to the USA or Latin America Other countries symbolize the fleeting chance to escape ordinary life while snippets of Spanish and French flavor many stories with the diversity of the North American experience Motherhood especially mothers sought and lost is another robust elementSee my full review at Foreword

  2. BookCupid BookCupid says:

    Believe it or not I actually lost this book and found it recently Hence the reading time lapse The book promised us imperfect women and I for one am glad Dean wrote them in such a way It didn't take lots of pages to reveal that most women lived with scars from past memories An ex who left them and came back with plane tickets mom leaving home hooking up with a stranger this all pretty much sounds like my life now that I think of itAll in all an interesting short stories collection that will remind you of your own past wounds and give you the desire to let go of the past and just look forward

  3. Vic Cavalli Vic Cavalli says:

    Leesa Dean is a young writer with genuine promise I like good sentences and there are a lot of them in this collectionEarly in the first story “Waiting for the Cyclone” we read “He kissed the top of my head and lingered there as if he might forget the smell of my hair once I was gone” 2 Beautifully stated and accurate to male experience And a bit further on the narrator says “Michael put his hand between my thighs I tightened my muscles to keep it there” 6 Again accurate The 12 year old narrator of “Malad” says “The rat’s name was Sid like the singer from the Sex Pistols” 18 which is a carefully nuanced allusion on Dean’s part as she shows the child’s innocence in this error Sid Vicious was their bass player who tragically died of a heroin overdose and Johnny Rotten was their singer Deeper into the story we learn of the mesuite trees that “Sometimes have to dig their roots a hundred feet for water they’re determined to survive” and this beneath “the night sky all lit up with stars a star forest” 20 And the same young narrator notices that “Her eyes looked fake and shiny like the clear rocks at the bottom of auariums” 21In “Tiebreaker” we read “Columbia Lake was the colour of laundry detergent” 37 A strikingly simple complex imageIn “Proverbs” Dean effectively shows the patterns of pain inherent in infidelity She evokes the setting as Amy “drops her backpack on the furthest bench where a local teenager has scratched RURAL TORTURE into the paint” 68 Soon we see “A wide veranda laced by dark foliage” 69 and learn that Amy was at one time “in a choir” 73 which hints at her eroded spiritual emotional foundation As Amy begins to bond with her cabin mate Michelle “The mountains are pink edged and the sky is reminiscent of its former blue” 75 As they become closer the narrator notes “It could be a ritual the two of them writing letters to their faraway men by candlelight” 76 And in the beautifully handled climax of the story “Amy sits close and talks to Michelle in a voice that sounds like a soft ocean While in the distance the ripe eggplants pull toward the ground and the tomatoes stand out bright red in a sea of green” 91In “One Last Time” we read “When I could no longer be good and let you sleep I slid my hand across your stomach knowing you’d wake up and make love to me once twice”126 The author never describes these sexual experiences This level of minimalist restraint pervades all of the stories Dean’s strategy invites the reader to visualize and it also creates the sense that the narratives especially when they deal with sexuality are rushed summaries of what happened For me this is odd but also effective The setting in “One Last Time” echoes this pattern of uick undeveloped touching intimacy when we learn that “Irrigation sprinklers ticked in wide arcs leaving tiny rainbows over the parched grass” 129 A beautiful sentence like a line lifted from a poem The intimate scenes are luminous uickly fadingAnd in “September” we read “That night the sunset over Lake Superior nearly destroyed me The bright pink sky burst into the car and seemed to hug me It felt like love and I couldn’t stop crying” 132 Throughout the collection there are hints of spirituality lost of a numb unease and meaninglessness undergirding the attempts at intimate relationships It is as if the narrator is often trying to be tough and put on an insensitive façade while deep inside she is crying out to be “destroyed” with “love” A good example is in “Monterrico” where we read “They’d only been together six months when she found out she was pregnant Not that she wanted to keep it but she still felt something when the blue line surfaced on the test” 164 The characters seem to be on the edge of an abyss There’s to say about this And in “Gone to Seed” pregnant Erika cries as she hears how good it is that she has “a wonderful husband who will be with her every step of the way” 189 which of course is not true but rather her deepest yearningIn the final story “Shelter from the Wind” Dean continues to explore the themes of conception pregnancy and solitude “Chelsea sees the grainy ultrasound which showed everything—fingers and toes the shape of the face” 192 and then “Just before midnight the city’s north end lost power Patrick lit a candle a vigil for his lost opportunity A marmalade glow emanated from the wick” 193 Soon after this scene Chelsea flashes back and we read this beautiful description of the conception of her child with Marco “They left their clothes on the shore and made love in a shallow bay sand clouding around Chelsea’s knees as she straddled Marco In the distance two flamingos stood near the shore with their backs turned elegantly facing the sun” 197 Wonderful writing This is my favorite story in the collection and I won’t say Read it; it’s really goodFreuently in fact very freuently in Waiting for the Cyclone Leesa Dean’s stories “pull toward the ground” and “stand out”—and that’s a good way to begin one’s publication career as a writer

  4. Norman Feliks Jezioranski Norman Feliks Jezioranski says:

    You can read my review on the Broken Pencil website

  5. Kevin Hogg Kevin Hogg says:

    A very interesting collection of short stories linked by an intriguing theme of women who are true to themselves often in the face of society's expectations They are generally self reliant and confident but their outlooks on life vary widely from compassionate to hedonistic Freuently unpredictable twists and a generous helping of heartbreak make their experiences resonate with the readerI wanted to pick out a few favourites but it's tough The gradual revelations of backstory and the uniue situations the characters find themselves in make for memorable moments in each At times the reader gets a hint of the ending but even when the prediction is correct it comes with enough complication in the way to maintain uncertainty often right until the final sentenceIf I had to choose three I enjoyed the interactions and self reflection in Proverbs the sense of freedom and lingering hope in September and the complicated relationships of Shelter from the Storm However the entire book is filled with some great writing and standout sentences often finding creative and poignant ways to express the small details of relationships and daily life

  6. Laurie Siblock Laurie Siblock says:

    This book of short stories is full of relatable people and life details; the characters are complex and very human and there is insight delivered in subtle poignant moments I highly recommend this book

  7. Becky Becky says:

    I'm not in the habit of rating books by friends but I will say that this collection by Leesa Dean is a fantastic read More than the sum of its stories the collection pulled me along from one tale to the next The gusting and gutsy force propelling me through Waiting for the Cyclone's pages was the strength of Leesa's storm weathered characters women from across Canada facing turbulent times as they travel search for love drink too much and make mistakes Each character felt like a fully imagined woman that I have either been or known or a woman I've been friends or enemies with Leesa's stories are beautifully written and they cover a lot of ground geographically and emotionally I highly recommend joining her characters for a road trip

  8. Frances Frances says:

    I haven't read a book of short stories in a few years and so the timing of this book as a gift was perfect Each story features a female in various situations I enjoyed all of them for their realism and character development Even though they were short stories I felt a connection to many of the characters and their lives I really enjoyed this book

  9. Delia Delia says:

    What a wonderful collection of characters many of whom will stay with me for some time to come They are the kind of stories that will come to me later I will have to remember whether I read it or whether it was recounted to me by someone who was there

  10. Jen Jen says:

    I'm not a big short story reader but this was recommended to me Wow each one was good Each female main character was real imperfect flawed and relatable I highly recommend this if you are looking for strong and genuine female characters

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