Paperback è Jarðnæði Epub Þ

Paperback è Jarðnæði Epub Þ


Jarðnæði ➹ [Download] ➵ Jarðnæði By Oddný Eir ➼ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk In the wake of Iceland’s financial crisis a young author recently separated and feeling out the uncertain terrain of a new relationship finds herself uestioning the foundations of our love and famil In the wake of Iceland’s financial crisis a young author recently separated and feeling out the uncertain terrain of a new relationship finds herself uestioning the foundations of our love and family lives our bonds to country and the earth Stirred by a dream about an old Viking woman on a pilgrimage she sets out on a uest to the the ruins of the homes of her ancestors where they tried to live in harmony with nature and each other Her guiding uestions are as essential as their answers are elusive How do we create a home for love How can we nourish personal space while sustaining intimacy and desire with a partner How can we go not back but forward to natureDrawn both to her archaeologist brother and her ornithologist lover she explores alternate forms that those relationships might take Her search brings her all over Iceland and abroad to Paris Strasbourg Basel and the Lake District home of famous Romantic siblings Dorothy and William Wordsworth Written in the form of a diary that pans from small details to big uestions and weaves elements of philosophy history archaeology ecology eroticism and literature into a beautifully patterned whole Oddný Eir invents a new intimate language between writer and reader in this enchanting book about being human in the modern world .

  • Paperback
  • 240 pages
  • Jarðnæði
  • Oddný Eir
  • English
  • 14 March 2016
  • 9781632060723

About the Author: Oddný Eir

Oddný Eir is an Icelandic author whose novel Land of Love and Ruins won the EU Prize for Literature and the Icelandic Women’s Literature Prize In addition to publishing four novels and several books of poetry and essays she has worked in the art world as a lecturer and gallerist has received a grant to study archives and museums in Iceland has been an environmental activist and has col.



10 thoughts on “Jarðnæði

  1. Jenny (Reading Envy) Jenny (Reading Envy) says:

    When I subscribed to Restless Books this year I also got to add a title from the backlist I was circling between the Cuban science fiction titles and this one and ultimately chose the Icelandic title It isn't often a novel is blurbed by Bjork and I guess the author has written songs with her and both are involved in environmental activism that will not be a surprise to anyone who has read this bookApparently Eir is known for her autobiographical fiction but this is the first of her novels to be translated into English please This is written as diary entries covering a whole host of topics from Iceland after the economic crisis belonging home love land ownership natural resources the spirit of places siblings hermits etc It doesn't hurt that the author of the entries and other characters in the novel are always reading from the sagas which seems to be a thread throughout all modern Icelandic lit that these stories still permeate still matter still form their thinkingAdd to that memorable characters and descriptions of astounding places around the country I've always wanted to visit A deep but short read I read it in one sitting

  2. Magdelanye Magdelanye says:

    You can't enter another persons world too uickly you've got to sift throughp14This is certainly true for this rather dreamy meandering meditation on home and nation and how to be in the worldThis left me rather lost at times the placemarkers being mostly in Icelandic; Neither was I that familiar with its legends and landmarks nor the present economic situation Even the relationships disguised by code names seemed mysterious in the moody fog of descriptionStill it was a pleasant journeyA keen observer learns things that cannot be learned in any other way To those who know how to watch and listen nature willingly opens all it's doorsuoted on p212 from Sonata of the Sea by Gunnar

  3. Elina Elina says:

    This was a very Icelandic read It had the very Nordic sense of the sky being a bit higher and the wind being raw than say in Italy I'm not sure I actually understood this book at least it had layers that remained unfolded Still I found it very enjoyable and it gave me a lot to think about

  4. Tinna Tinna says:

    Loved it and probably will read chapters from it again and again Beautiful Lots of thoughts that I share and just wish I had found such great words to describe

  5. Kathleen Gray Kathleen Gray says:

    It's hard to give this stars or comment on the plot because there really isn't one Read the blurb closely before choosing this it is philosophical than character driven and there certainly is some sort of new language I tried really hard because I have been to Iceland and have read other Icelandic literature but I just found this really hard Thanks to edelweiss for the ARC You will like this if you are open to new types of literature and are familiar with the uirks of a translated book

  6. Dirk Dirk says:

    As long as a reader remembers that Land of Love and Ruins is a collection of diary entries ruminations of a day or moment as opposed to beginning middle and end narrative there are many pleasures to be had in this uirky conversational offering

  7. Juanita Buitrago Juanita Buitrago says:

    Took me WAY too long to read Some powerful sentences in here but I found myself constantly looking for something to sink my teeth into

  8. Restless Books Restless Books says:

    “Peripatetic and reflective bookish and uietly beguiling the narrator of Land of Love and Ruins has clear antecedents in the WG Sebald of The Rings of Saturn and Teju Cole’s Julius in Open City If her solitude is less reticent less chastened than theirs this is likely because she has not been driven by obliue trauma to protective self erasure She seeks connection with others and is honest about her desires even as she worries about the emotional and intellectual costs of compromising her autonomy in order to fulfill them In this way Land of Love and Ruins is less an extension of Sebald’s line than of recent path breaking genre porous narratives such as Eileen Myles’ Inferno Jenny Offill’s Dept of Speculation Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts and Lynne Tillman’s Someday This Will Be Funny uestions about what makes a family what constitutes a partnership and how the need to love and be loved conflicts with the need to be your own person become uestions about what makes a country what constitutes sustainability and what happens when growth and consumption exceed the limits of what the earth can bear Land of Love and Ruins is an extraordinary novel I can’t remember the last time I read a book at once so understated yet unrestrained”—Justin Taylor Los Angeles Times“Oddný Eir is an authentic author philosopher and mystic She weaves together diaries and fiction She is the writer I feel can best express the female psyche of now A true pioneer”—Björk“Winner of the EU Prize for Literature this meditative novel by Icelandic shooting star Eir she’s collaborated with Björk features a nameless young narrator home again after a break up and launching a spiritual uest She seeks peace and solitude in nature visiting Iceland’s meadows and lava fields with a tentative new ornithologist boyfriend who for a time goes to live in a cave But she’s also deeply sociable sharing many homey moments with family particularly her archaeologist brother and traveling to Basel Paris and in search of sustaining interactions with art and artists In fact the narrator herself is a writer deeply imbued with Iceland’s language and literary traditions Without ever sounding like a screed the book considers how we manage intimacy and live in a world rife with social and economic injustice VERDICT Reading this lyrically sometimes even deliciously written work is almost as good as going on one’s own spiritual uest; it will have great appeal to any reader beyond thrill seeking shoot ’em up fans”—Barbara Hoffert Library Journal starred reviewIn Land of Love and Ruins passages sometimes verge on the poetic and a beautiful satisfying insight can often be its own reward no matter what it contributes to the broader narrative Land of Love and Ruin is a rewarding if deeply reflexive little book It pokes and prods at philosophy and sociology but never excessively always couching them in a framework of feeling and everyday life The diary mode is again a useful vehicle for bringing together such varied directions the narrator’s musings range from Icelandic sagas to Greek mythology; from Confucianism to Hannah Arendt Land of Love and Ruins is a meditation on the present condition on how our fragmented emotional selves correspond to our fragmented economies on how progressive minded socialist and feminist selves can still find solace in old traditions and familial histories There are no conclusions to be found in such a work which borders the poetic and prose memory and fiction The pleasure here is to be found in the journey—Hans Rollman PopMatters

  9. Patricia Herlevi Patricia Herlevi says:

    I'm enjoying this literary fiction set in Iceland and England The author Oddny Eir is new to me She structures her novel in the shape of a travel diary However she's not on an action adventure but or less contemplating the environmental fate of Iceland and other Nordic countries or reflecting on icons of her country's past It has been a slower read for me because of the numerous details in each chapter Don't be fooled by the thinness of the novel It is euivalent to one of those art films by old time French directors where a camera lens lovingly travels over a face for ten minutes Anyway there is a lot here for your soul to drink in

  10. Anneke Alnatour Anneke Alnatour says:

    Yes there might not really be a story here but nevertheless it was a very enjoyable read for me I really liked the autobiographical element; I really felt like was given a window on a life of someone I really felt I was getting to know well A rather nice person and not so very unlike me and I had a strong feeling of friend potential which is uite rare in novelsAnd yes would love to read about my new friend Oddny Though it might remain a rather one sided relationship I guess

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “Jarðnæði

  1. Jenny (Reading Envy) Jenny (Reading Envy) says:

    When I subscribed to Restless Books this year I also got to add a title from the backlist I was circling between the Cuban science fiction titles and this one and ultimately chose the Icelandic title It isn't often a novel is blurbed by Bjork and I guess the author has written songs with her and both are involved in environmental activism that will not be a surprise to anyone who has read this bookApparently Eir is known for her autobiographical fiction but this is the first of her novels to be translated into English please This is written as diary entries covering a whole host of topics from Iceland after the economic crisis belonging home love land ownership natural resources the spirit of places siblings hermits etc It doesn't hurt that the author of the entries and other characters in the novel are always reading from the sagas which seems to be a thread throughout all modern Icelandic lit that these stories still permeate still matter still form their thinkingAdd to that memorable characters and descriptions of astounding places around the country I've always wanted to visit A deep but short read I read it in one sitting

  2. Magdelanye Magdelanye says:

    You can't enter another persons world too uickly you've got to sift throughp14This is certainly true for this rather dreamy meandering meditation on home and nation and how to be in the worldThis left me rather lost at times the placemarkers being mostly in Icelandic; Neither was I that familiar with its legends and landmarks nor the present economic situation Even the relationships disguised by code names seemed mysterious in the moody fog of descriptionStill it was a pleasant journeyA keen observer learns things that cannot be learned in any other way To those who know how to watch and listen nature willingly opens all it's doorsuoted on p212 from Sonata of the Sea by Gunnar

  3. Elina Elina says:

    This was a very Icelandic read It had the very Nordic sense of the sky being a bit higher and the wind being raw than say in Italy I'm not sure I actually understood this book at least it had layers that remained unfolded Still I found it very enjoyable and it gave me a lot to think about

  4. Tinna Tinna says:

    Loved it and probably will read chapters from it again and again Beautiful Lots of thoughts that I share and just wish I had found such great words to describe

  5. Kathleen Gray Kathleen Gray says:

    It's hard to give this stars or comment on the plot because there really isn't one Read the blurb closely before choosing this it is philosophical than character driven and there certainly is some sort of new language I tried really hard because I have been to Iceland and have read other Icelandic literature but I just found this really hard Thanks to edelweiss for the ARC You will like this if you are open to new types of literature and are familiar with the uirks of a translated book

  6. Dirk Dirk says:

    As long as a reader remembers that Land of Love and Ruins is a collection of diary entries ruminations of a day or moment as opposed to beginning middle and end narrative there are many pleasures to be had in this uirky conversational offering

  7. Juanita Buitrago Juanita Buitrago says:

    Took me WAY too long to read Some powerful sentences in here but I found myself constantly looking for something to sink my teeth into

  8. Restless Books Restless Books says:

    “Peripatetic and reflective bookish and uietly beguiling the narrator of Land of Love and Ruins has clear antecedents in the WG Sebald of The Rings of Saturn and Teju Cole’s Julius in Open City If her solitude is less reticent less chastened than theirs this is likely because she has not been driven by obliue trauma to protective self erasure She seeks connection with others and is honest about her desires even as she worries about the emotional and intellectual costs of compromising her autonomy in order to fulfill them In this way Land of Love and Ruins is less an extension of Sebald’s line than of recent path breaking genre porous narratives such as Eileen Myles’ Inferno Jenny Offill’s Dept of Speculation Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts and Lynne Tillman’s Someday This Will Be Funny uestions about what makes a family what constitutes a partnership and how the need to love and be loved conflicts with the need to be your own person become uestions about what makes a country what constitutes sustainability and what happens when growth and consumption exceed the limits of what the earth can bear Land of Love and Ruins is an extraordinary novel I can’t remember the last time I read a book at once so understated yet unrestrained”—Justin Taylor Los Angeles Times“Oddný Eir is an authentic author philosopher and mystic She weaves together diaries and fiction She is the writer I feel can best express the female psyche of now A true pioneer”—Björk“Winner of the EU Prize for Literature this meditative novel by Icelandic shooting star Eir she’s collaborated with Björk features a nameless young narrator home again after a break up and launching a spiritual uest She seeks peace and solitude in nature visiting Iceland’s meadows and lava fields with a tentative new ornithologist boyfriend who for a time goes to live in a cave But she’s also deeply sociable sharing many homey moments with family particularly her archaeologist brother and traveling to Basel Paris and in search of sustaining interactions with art and artists In fact the narrator herself is a writer deeply imbued with Iceland’s language and literary traditions Without ever sounding like a screed the book considers how we manage intimacy and live in a world rife with social and economic injustice VERDICT Reading this lyrically sometimes even deliciously written work is almost as good as going on one’s own spiritual uest; it will have great appeal to any reader beyond thrill seeking shoot ’em up fans”—Barbara Hoffert Library Journal starred reviewIn Land of Love and Ruins passages sometimes verge on the poetic and a beautiful satisfying insight can often be its own reward no matter what it contributes to the broader narrative Land of Love and Ruin is a rewarding if deeply reflexive little book It pokes and prods at philosophy and sociology but never excessively always couching them in a framework of feeling and everyday life The diary mode is again a useful vehicle for bringing together such varied directions the narrator’s musings range from Icelandic sagas to Greek mythology; from Confucianism to Hannah Arendt Land of Love and Ruins is a meditation on the present condition on how our fragmented emotional selves correspond to our fragmented economies on how progressive minded socialist and feminist selves can still find solace in old traditions and familial histories There are no conclusions to be found in such a work which borders the poetic and prose memory and fiction The pleasure here is to be found in the journey—Hans Rollman PopMatters

  9. Patricia Herlevi Patricia Herlevi says:

    I'm enjoying this literary fiction set in Iceland and England The author Oddny Eir is new to me She structures her novel in the shape of a travel diary However she's not on an action adventure but or less contemplating the environmental fate of Iceland and other Nordic countries or reflecting on icons of her country's past It has been a slower read for me because of the numerous details in each chapter Don't be fooled by the thinness of the novel It is euivalent to one of those art films by old time French directors where a camera lens lovingly travels over a face for ten minutes Anyway there is a lot here for your soul to drink in

  10. Anneke Alnatour Anneke Alnatour says:

    Yes there might not really be a story here but nevertheless it was a very enjoyable read for me I really liked the autobiographical element; I really felt like was given a window on a life of someone I really felt I was getting to know well A rather nice person and not so very unlike me and I had a strong feeling of friend potential which is uite rare in novelsAnd yes would love to read about my new friend Oddny Though it might remain a rather one sided relationship I guess

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *