Three Years with uantrill MOBI Á Three Years

Three Years with uantrill MOBI Á Three Years

Three Years with uantrill [PDF / Epub] ✅ Three Years with uantrill Author John McCorkle – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk This famous memoir by John McCorkle reissued for the first time is the best published account by a scout who rode with uantrill John McCorkle was a young Missouri farmer of Southern sympathies After s This famous memoir by John McCorkle reissued for the first time is the best published account by a scout who rode with uantrill John McCorkle was a young Missouri farmer of Southern sympathies After serving briefly in the pro Confederate Missouri State Guard he became a prominent member of William Clarke uantrill’s infamous guerrillas who took advantage of the turmoil in the Missouri Three Years PDF/EPUB or Kansas borderland to prey on pro Union peopleMcCorkle displayed an unflinchingly violent nature while he participated in raids and engagements including the massacres at Lawrence and Baxter Springs Kansas and Centralia Missouri In he followed uantrill into Kentucky where the notorious leader was killed and his followers McCorkle among them surrendered and were paroled by Union authorities Early in this century having returned to farming McCorkle told his remarkable Civil War experiences to OS Barton a lawyer who wrote this book first published in .


10 thoughts on “Three Years with uantrill

  1. Heidi The Reader Heidi The Reader says:

    In Three Years of uantrill John McCorkle recounts riding as an irregular with William uantrill and how they fought against the Federals in Missouri and Kansas during the American Civil WarIt is a sobering look at how war is hell McCorkle never knew who he could trust and who he couldn't During the infamous raid at Lawrence Kansas McCorkle says that some good men may have died in the raid but that wasn't our intentIt's hard to imagine what a country at odds with itself must have been like People would take advantage of each other steal property and even the lives of their neighborsMy one uibble with this memoir is it contains a lot of travel It feels like McCorkle said we went here then here then here as he goes through his memories of the war There's plenty of hours of boredom punctuated by moments of terrorRecommended for history readers who want an original source for research about the American Civil War


  2. Montzalee Wittmann Montzalee Wittmann says:

    Three Years with uantrill A True Story Told By His Scout by John McCorkle O S Barton is a true history read I love history and this is a pretty good book Although the harsh and brutal times show through it is true to the times of the day It is a little slow in a couple of spots but makes up for it in others Overall it is a great read if you are a history nut like me


  3. Dee Arr Dee Arr says:

    John McCorkle who dictated this book to author OS Barton states at the end that the book was “written in the spirit expressed in the language of Abraham Lincoln ‘with malice toward none and with charity to all’ “ Throughout the reading this spirit seemed to have been embraced with the exceptions being when Mr McCorkle described what he undoubtedly felt were crimes and not acts by honorable soldiersJohn McCorkle joined up with Colonel uantrill in August of 1862 and rode under his command until the end of the Civil War in 1865 Mr McCorkle includes some of the recognizable names of others in uantrill’s command most notably Cole and Jim Younger and Frank and Jesse James The book details the different battles and skirmishes over those three years which only came to an end after the surrender of General LeeWhat is most interesting are the details surrounding Mr McCorkle’s three years as a soldier and the actions of Southern citizens who were not part of the fight but were still active supporters This period of history occurred a time when brother fought brother and Federal and Confederate supporters were many times only separated by the fences of each other’s farms Mr McCorkle’s actions also mirrored those of other soldiers who lived in the Missouri Kansas part of the country who became extremely dedicated soldiers after being affected by atrocities committed by Federal soldiers One does have to keep in perspective the bloody history of that section of the country in the few years previous to the war which certainly would have an effect on everyone no matter which side of the conflict they chose to standWhether you have read anything about the Civil War or this is your first time “Three Years with uantrill” will present a different perspective on the motives of Confederate soldiers As a book it may not be the best written piece of literature but as a document of recorded personal history it is priceless Five stars


  4. Austin Austin says:

    This book played out a little different than the Redleg book I read earlier These boys simply seemed to be protecting my fellow Missourians from the thieving raping murdering Redlegs and Union flunkies not fit for real combat back east I am always a little skeptical of the watered down history we get in school told by the victor I don't even believe the modern narrative that's gotten us into Orwellian never ending wars For instance the black boxes were never found on 911 but paper passports were? Building seven fell at free fall speed from a little flesh wound? So I have no reason to believe McCorkle was lying when he talked about the misdeeds of the redleg jayhawkers or the union men And I laugh when I hear liberals and conservatives talk about another war that is anything but civil We're so soft we wouldn't make it one day without an air conditioner or rectangle to stare at


  5. Roger Barnstead Roger Barnstead says:

    an excellent volume and as I knew next to nothing about uantrill except what hollywood had to say about him I enjoyed it


  6. Ti Alex Ti Alex says:

    One of the few primary sources available regarding the enigmatic William Clarke uantrill McCorkle comes across as a man in denial and seems to have been so desensitised to violence that he skates over some of the greatest war crimes in American history The massacre of civilians at Lawrence Kansas; and Bill Anderson's massacre of unarmed soldiers at Centralia No mention of mutilation or the scalping which was a signature of the Missouri Guerillas McCorkle paints his gang as legitimate members of the confederacy referring to uantrill as 'Colonel' and other members as 'captains' Occasionally the mask slips and the author divulges an insight into their tactics stealing horses running and hiding in the brush killing anyone who crosses them and taking potshots at any black man in a federal uniform The final year shows how the net was rapidly closing in on uantrill and how they spent most of their final months riding around posing as Union men in blue federal uniforms which they had stolen for the corpses of murdered US soldiers Unfortunately McCorkle never accurately describes uantrill or his other guerrilla companions The closest glimpses we get are of his recollections of what he remembers uantrill saying A fascinating memoir nonetheless


  7. Greg Bowman Greg Bowman says:

    Interesting view of a 19th century guerrilla 's mindThe narrative seemed honest if sometimes stilted in the manner of the times He defends uantrill and his command as heroic and chivalrous I'd like to believe that was true but it's clear that the author is unabashedly partisan so there must be other sides to the story Jesse James and Cole Younger appear freuently in the story so you can get an idea of the experience that shaped their lives I'd recommend it for those interested in the history of that time


  8. David Booth David Booth says:

    Cracking story written with integrity and brevity He seemed to have been involved with some dark deeds where men who murdered and pillaged in the name of the Union were given short shrift and dispatched to their Maker for further judgement No sickly sentimentality or false sympathy as would be the case today and no mention of PTSD or signs of it What did impress me was the use of a Parole System by both sides where if you promised to leave the field of battle you were allowed to go unharmed The only blot on the South’s record was “Bloody“ Bill Anderson who’s deeds were condemned by all Phenomenal memory for details places names events etc with no hint of false fiction


  9. Tim Shepard Tim Shepard says:

    An interesting read taken from the life account of one of the men who rode with uantrill There were some interesting points in the book Obviously there was nothing self incriminating No references about what any individual did it did not do Instead all actions were taken as a group Also interesting is that uantrill's story to his own men about his life does not match history


  10. J Sams J Sams says:

    A clearly written and succinct accountIf you are looking for gore blood and atrocities you will need to look somewhere else Mr McCorkle tells his story like mundane business


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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “Three Years with uantrill

  1. Heidi The Reader Heidi The Reader says:

    In Three Years of uantrill John McCorkle recounts riding as an irregular with William uantrill and how they fought against the Federals in Missouri and Kansas during the American Civil WarIt is a sobering look at how war is hell McCorkle never knew who he could trust and who he couldn't During the infamous raid at Lawrence Kansas McCorkle says that some good men may have died in the raid but that wasn't our intentIt's hard to imagine what a country at odds with itself must have been like People would take advantage of each other steal property and even the lives of their neighborsMy one uibble with this memoir is it contains a lot of travel It feels like McCorkle said we went here then here then here as he goes through his memories of the war There's plenty of hours of boredom punctuated by moments of terrorRecommended for history readers who want an original source for research about the American Civil War

  2. Montzalee Wittmann Montzalee Wittmann says:

    Three Years with uantrill A True Story Told By His Scout by John McCorkle O S Barton is a true history read I love history and this is a pretty good book Although the harsh and brutal times show through it is true to the times of the day It is a little slow in a couple of spots but makes up for it in others Overall it is a great read if you are a history nut like me

  3. Dee Arr Dee Arr says:

    John McCorkle who dictated this book to author OS Barton states at the end that the book was “written in the spirit expressed in the language of Abraham Lincoln ‘with malice toward none and with charity to all’ “ Throughout the reading this spirit seemed to have been embraced with the exceptions being when Mr McCorkle described what he undoubtedly felt were crimes and not acts by honorable soldiersJohn McCorkle joined up with Colonel uantrill in August of 1862 and rode under his command until the end of the Civil War in 1865 Mr McCorkle includes some of the recognizable names of others in uantrill’s command most notably Cole and Jim Younger and Frank and Jesse James The book details the different battles and skirmishes over those three years which only came to an end after the surrender of General LeeWhat is most interesting are the details surrounding Mr McCorkle’s three years as a soldier and the actions of Southern citizens who were not part of the fight but were still active supporters This period of history occurred a time when brother fought brother and Federal and Confederate supporters were many times only separated by the fences of each other’s farms Mr McCorkle’s actions also mirrored those of other soldiers who lived in the Missouri Kansas part of the country who became extremely dedicated soldiers after being affected by atrocities committed by Federal soldiers One does have to keep in perspective the bloody history of that section of the country in the few years previous to the war which certainly would have an effect on everyone no matter which side of the conflict they chose to standWhether you have read anything about the Civil War or this is your first time “Three Years with uantrill” will present a different perspective on the motives of Confederate soldiers As a book it may not be the best written piece of literature but as a document of recorded personal history it is priceless Five stars

  4. Austin Austin says:

    This book played out a little different than the Redleg book I read earlier These boys simply seemed to be protecting my fellow Missourians from the thieving raping murdering Redlegs and Union flunkies not fit for real combat back east I am always a little skeptical of the watered down history we get in school told by the victor I don't even believe the modern narrative that's gotten us into Orwellian never ending wars For instance the black boxes were never found on 911 but paper passports were? Building seven fell at free fall speed from a little flesh wound? So I have no reason to believe McCorkle was lying when he talked about the misdeeds of the redleg jayhawkers or the union men And I laugh when I hear liberals and conservatives talk about another war that is anything but civil We're so soft we wouldn't make it one day without an air conditioner or rectangle to stare at

  5. Roger Barnstead Roger Barnstead says:

    an excellent volume and as I knew next to nothing about uantrill except what hollywood had to say about him I enjoyed it

  6. Ti Alex Ti Alex says:

    One of the few primary sources available regarding the enigmatic William Clarke uantrill McCorkle comes across as a man in denial and seems to have been so desensitised to violence that he skates over some of the greatest war crimes in American history The massacre of civilians at Lawrence Kansas; and Bill Anderson's massacre of unarmed soldiers at Centralia No mention of mutilation or the scalping which was a signature of the Missouri Guerillas McCorkle paints his gang as legitimate members of the confederacy referring to uantrill as 'Colonel' and other members as 'captains' Occasionally the mask slips and the author divulges an insight into their tactics stealing horses running and hiding in the brush killing anyone who crosses them and taking potshots at any black man in a federal uniform The final year shows how the net was rapidly closing in on uantrill and how they spent most of their final months riding around posing as Union men in blue federal uniforms which they had stolen for the corpses of murdered US soldiers Unfortunately McCorkle never accurately describes uantrill or his other guerrilla companions The closest glimpses we get are of his recollections of what he remembers uantrill saying A fascinating memoir nonetheless

  7. Greg Bowman Greg Bowman says:

    Interesting view of a 19th century guerrilla 's mindThe narrative seemed honest if sometimes stilted in the manner of the times He defends uantrill and his command as heroic and chivalrous I'd like to believe that was true but it's clear that the author is unabashedly partisan so there must be other sides to the story Jesse James and Cole Younger appear freuently in the story so you can get an idea of the experience that shaped their lives I'd recommend it for those interested in the history of that time

  8. David Booth David Booth says:

    Cracking story written with integrity and brevity He seemed to have been involved with some dark deeds where men who murdered and pillaged in the name of the Union were given short shrift and dispatched to their Maker for further judgement No sickly sentimentality or false sympathy as would be the case today and no mention of PTSD or signs of it What did impress me was the use of a Parole System by both sides where if you promised to leave the field of battle you were allowed to go unharmed The only blot on the South’s record was “Bloody“ Bill Anderson who’s deeds were condemned by all Phenomenal memory for details places names events etc with no hint of false fiction

  9. Tim Shepard Tim Shepard says:

    An interesting read taken from the life account of one of the men who rode with uantrill There were some interesting points in the book Obviously there was nothing self incriminating No references about what any individual did it did not do Instead all actions were taken as a group Also interesting is that uantrill's story to his own men about his life does not match history

  10. J Sams J Sams says:

    A clearly written and succinct accountIf you are looking for gore blood and atrocities you will need to look somewhere else Mr McCorkle tells his story like mundane business

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *