Don't Make Me Think! A common sense approach to web

Don't Make Me Think! A common sense approach to web

Don't Make Me Think! A common sense approach to web usability ❴Download❵ ✤ Don't Make Me Think! A common sense approach to web usability Author Steve Krug – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Since Don’t Make Me Think was first published in 2000 over 400000 Web designers and developers have relied on Steve Krug’s guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and Me Think! PDF/EPUB ä Since Don’t Make Me Think was first published in over Web designers and developers have relied on Steve Krug’s guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and information design Witty Make Me Think! A common ePUB ´ commonsensical and eminently practical it’s one of the best loved and most recommended books on the subjectIn this rd edition Steve returns with fresh perspective to reexamine the principles that made Don’t Make Me Think a classic –with updated examples and a new chapter on mobile usability And it’s still short profusely illustratedand best of all–fun Don't Make PDF/EPUB ² to readIf you’ve read it before you’ll rediscover what made Don’t Make Me Think so essential to Web designers and developers around the world If you’ve never read it you’ll see why so many people have said it should be reuired reading for anyone working on Web sites.


10 thoughts on “Don't Make Me Think! A common sense approach to web usability

  1. Kian Kian says:

    Well this is an absolute gem of a book I picked this up the day after finishing Beautiful Code and to be honest really wasn't in the mood for any particularly heavy content for a few daysBut Steve Krug makes the topic of web usability genuinely entertaing He holds a light writing style with a touch of wit that helps to keep your attention from cover to cover Add to that the short size of the book at only a couple of hundred pages and the vibrant but clear layout and you've got a book that's in itself extremely usable and accessibleWhen it comes to the content itself it couldn't be explained clearer Steve's chapters are logical and concise you won't find any waffle in here that doesn't help to communicate the message of the chapter He uses a adeuate number of examples to illustrate his points and even helps to demonstrate how various stakeholders in web projects can all contribute to the usability of the siteFor me the most interesting idea was of usability testing Having led a relatively sheltered web life with most of my work either focusing on small scale projects or internal projects the concept of usability testing presented as a lightweight process that can be repeated at minimal cost over and over again had not occured to me Steve presents a framework for running these sessions that elimates all excuses for usability testing to be included in a project lifecycleWho would I recommend the book to Anybody with a stake in web projects Managers should read it on one of their first class trans atlantic trips designers should read it and keep the golden rules to heart before they put pen to paper or stylus to tablet and programmersdevelopers should read it to understand the technical reuirements of implementing usability Rarely do I say a book has opened my eyes but I think I'll make an exception with this one


  2. Keyo Çalî Keyo Çalî says:

    a pensive book for developersEvery developer needs to read itIt makes me think deeply about usability and accessibilityFor example after I read a chapter on accessibility I decided to design a website that could be helpful for blind people Its main purpose is to help us have a better life Because we use the software than anything else now You are reading my review on a website or on an application Steve Krug's style makes me have a smile on my face while reading and understand it very well


  3. Leonard Gaya Leonard Gaya says:

    I read this handbook on Web usability for work related reasons It was originally published in the early 2000’s shortly after Jakob Nielsen’s Designing Web Usability Both Krug and Nielsen have since become along with Steve Jobs and Jony Ives at Apple the head honchos of Web DesignThis short and highly readable book covers topics such as how people really use websites they don’t actually read they like to scan and browse mindlessly but we already knew that didn’t we how to design navigation and breadcrumbs etc Krug insists on the importance of usability testing one chapter is actually a cookbook on how to conduct user tests without getting top heavy on the matter This recent republication also includes a chapter on designing for mobile and accessibilityA very enjoyable casual and oftentimes fun read that the staff at Goodreads should consider rereading from time to time a word to the wise is enoughThus far I'd say our old bookahs are still usable than anything digital or aren’t they


  4. Katelyn Jenkins Katelyn Jenkins says:

    uick thorough and to the point as it suggests Even inspired me to write a review on the web I don't even NEED to think twice to say this was a VERY GOOD e^3 readIt really is a book that can stand the test of time though all three iterations it keeps the tone and message good web design starts with instinct of the userKrug's book focuses on web usability fundamentals of good design and user experience testing Every web designer should get their hands on this as it is a reference for the mind about the mind give it a go it will have you thinking differently


  5. Sean Besser Sean Besser says:

    MUST READ for anyone with any say over the look feel of a commercial web page designers managers marketing people executives etc It's a uick and easy read and is like having my own web usability consultant Goodreads and LOTS of other sites should have their managment teams read this


  6. Mohamed Mohamed says:

    a great guideline for anyone who is interested in designing websites and products full of great examples and clear explanations BUT the book is a little bit outdated especially the mobile view part


  7. Graham Herrli Graham Herrli says:

    I was predisposed in favor of this book because it's the most voted for on the UX Stack Exchange It wasn't all I'd hoped it would be If this were the first text about usability I'd read I might have gotten out of it As it was the overwhelming majority of the topics presented seemed patently obvious to meOne thing this book has going for it is its brevity Before agreeing to publish a second edition Krug insisted upon first discovering what could be removed from the first edition so that no extra length would be added Rather than writing about details of debates relevant only to people completely immersed in usability he aims to convey the most essential concepts of the usability field as briefly as possible In this he succeeds The book is a clear introduction to some of the most important principles of the field However it glosses over them without going into depthPerhaps the most useful part of the book is a transcript of a sample usability test including what to say and do at the beginning of the test The introduction says that this chapter was abridged from three chapters in an earlier version of the book and some of the content was moved to Krug's site and expanded upon in a later book which I am now interested in readingSome other less useful things this book says areview spoiler The function of every element on the page should be as obvious as possible Aim to make things self evident but make them self explanatory at the very least Expect users to skim satisfice and muddle through pages Designers should make it easy to skim and make it so that users have to muddle as little as possible Use a clear visual hierarchy to help users find things faster Don't go against conventions unless your change brings a significant and easy to learn improvement Assume that every element is visual noise Use navigation elements not just to show people how to find what they're looking for but also to give them a sense of where they are and what else the site contains Navigation should be consistently laid out through all the levels of the site not just the top two Navigation elements particularly those showing the location of the current page should stick out Tabs connecting to the pages below are strong navigational elements All headers and labels should be clearly associated visually with the elements they relate to framing those elements Make sure that the homepage conveys the big picture It should tell what the site is about Use taglines rather than mottos next to site logos Tell what the site does not what it's ideals are The navigation should be the same on all pages except for the homepage and pages with forms Avoid the Tragedy of the Commons that occurs when too many things are added to the homepage All departments will want homepage links but too many homepage links will devalue the homepage The sections of the book about the homepage are decreasing in importance owing to the decreasing number of users actually landing on site home pages You shouldn't expect any one feature to be the best way of doing something for all users or a mythic Average User; instead focus on whether it creates a good experience for users who encounter it in its current context Focus groups are for initial planning; usability tests are for iterative improvement Test early informally and often This way you can improve the product and encounter issues in later tests that weren't evident until issues from the first test were resolved You can set up an inexpensive yet effective usability lab by placing a camcorder monitoring the screen in one room leading to a TV displaying the video to stakeholders in another room Use a screen recorder as well Before you have a working prototype run tests on a couple of sites with similar features or functionality to get a sense of what works well about them Be considerate of the user Try to have their best interests at heart To help make a site accessible to people with disabilities first make sure it's usable for people without disabilities Several small tweaks in the code can drastically improve accessibility hide spoiler


  8. Sandro Sandro says:

    What I liked The simple language used to explain normally complex matter; The good humour examples and metaphors the writer uses to explain things They really workNow the bad parts I find the information in the book to be a little too simplistic and common sense Even for people with only interest on the area of web usability they may find that they already know or at least thought in a very similar way when they browse daily; I understand that this isn't a scientific book and the author does refer to Nielsen a couple of times but all in all the knowledge in this book comes directly from the writer's mind with very little scientific sources to confirm what it's being said; Even the second edition is from 2005 almost 8 years have passed and most of the webpage elements he focus on the book aren't really that used any Still this isn't the author's fault Books age and so does the content they possess


  9. Muthazhagu Palanisamy Muthazhagu Palanisamy says:

    This book is what it states a common sense approach to web usabilityThe book lays bare the facts that 1 Users do not read the text in a web page2 Users muddle through a web page no matter how well thought out the layout and menus areAnd as a designer your task is to take these two facts into account when designing your websiteThe author Steve Krug is very perceptive While this is evident throughout the book what did it for me was the footnote about the Site ID being on the top right corner in web pages with right to left languages and his comment about inconsistent navigation options in many sites once you are two or three pages deep The first one is a nice call out the second I've been burnt by it so many timesThe section that talks about how to resolve design people problems when members of different teams prefer one design over another is a life saver for any Project Development Product Manager It clearly brings the focus back to the problem are we doing the right thing for the intended users of this websiteThe graphic showing what a webpage means to a CEO Developer Designer and Marketing nails each group's perspective on the headThe difference between a focus group and a usability testing team is explained wellThe chapters on usability testing is a must read for all A teams The table showing how much it would cost to do Get it and task based usability testing is very concise and useful I would recommend taking this no frills approach; a part of my org's development methodologyThat said the book is roughly ten years old The principles no doubt still hold good But it would be nice to see an updated version that talks about 1 The proliferation of social media and how to design for that2 Web based Enterprise application UI design#2 above is closer to home for me Type of uestion that I would like to be tackled In web based Enterprise apps that specifically deal with a particular vertical say Insurance how much can you assume that the user knows about the domain and conseuently how does that affect your designThe book is well laid out and you can see evidence of the author eating his own dog food The footnotes offer interesting segues sometimes not about web usability and the Recommended Reading section is a big plus It is an easy read at a little under 200 pages no reason your web dev team can't find time to read and re read it


  10. Chad Warner Chad Warner says:

    An excellent introduction to creating usable websites As the title states every website’s design and functionality should be so simple that people barely need to think to use it The book’s 2nd edition is from 2005 so some examples are dated but the concepts are uite relevant This was a fun read due to its straightforward style and Krug’s humorWhen I started looking for web design books Steve Krug’s classic on web usability freuently appeared at the top of most lists along with Designing with Web Standards by Jeffrey Zeldman see my review I highly recommend both booksSteve Krug’s Laws of UsabilityFirst Law Don’t make me think Make things obvious and self evident or at least self explanatory People scan; they don’t read People choose the first reasonable option People muddle through things rather than figure them outSecond Law It doesn't matter how many times I have to click as long as each click is a mindless unambiguous choice Make choices mindless for ease of useThird Law Get rid of half the words on each page then get rid of half of what's left Be ruthlessly conciseUsability testingTest early and often Test with 3 or 4 users Have each user think out loud as they use the site Use a screen recorder to record the session for reference Fix any problems then test again Review the results as soon as possibleAdditional notesNavigation helps users find things tells them where they are reveals content and tells how to use the site It must be good enough to help people who land on any pageThe home page should have a personable lively tagline conveying a value proposition The home page also needs a short scannable welcome blurb describing the siteKnow what people want and make those things obvious and easyOnly ask for information necessary to complete the transactionOnly make a site look good if it’s not at the expense of making it work well


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10 thoughts on “Don't Make Me Think! A common sense approach to web usability

  1. Kian Kian says:

    Well this is an absolute gem of a book I picked this up the day after finishing Beautiful Code and to be honest really wasn't in the mood for any particularly heavy content for a few daysBut Steve Krug makes the topic of web usability genuinely entertaing He holds a light writing style with a touch of wit that helps to keep your attention from cover to cover Add to that the short size of the book at only a couple of hundred pages and the vibrant but clear layout and you've got a book that's in itself extremely usable and accessibleWhen it comes to the content itself it couldn't be explained clearer Steve's chapters are logical and concise you won't find any waffle in here that doesn't help to communicate the message of the chapter He uses a adeuate number of examples to illustrate his points and even helps to demonstrate how various stakeholders in web projects can all contribute to the usability of the siteFor me the most interesting idea was of usability testing Having led a relatively sheltered web life with most of my work either focusing on small scale projects or internal projects the concept of usability testing presented as a lightweight process that can be repeated at minimal cost over and over again had not occured to me Steve presents a framework for running these sessions that elimates all excuses for usability testing to be included in a project lifecycleWho would I recommend the book to Anybody with a stake in web projects Managers should read it on one of their first class trans atlantic trips designers should read it and keep the golden rules to heart before they put pen to paper or stylus to tablet and programmersdevelopers should read it to understand the technical reuirements of implementing usability Rarely do I say a book has opened my eyes but I think I'll make an exception with this one

  2. Keyo Çalî Keyo Çalî says:

    a pensive book for developersEvery developer needs to read itIt makes me think deeply about usability and accessibilityFor example after I read a chapter on accessibility I decided to design a website that could be helpful for blind people Its main purpose is to help us have a better life Because we use the software than anything else now You are reading my review on a website or on an application Steve Krug's style makes me have a smile on my face while reading and understand it very well

  3. Leonard Gaya Leonard Gaya says:

    I read this handbook on Web usability for work related reasons It was originally published in the early 2000’s shortly after Jakob Nielsen’s Designing Web Usability Both Krug and Nielsen have since become along with Steve Jobs and Jony Ives at Apple the head honchos of Web DesignThis short and highly readable book covers topics such as how people really use websites they don’t actually read they like to scan and browse mindlessly but we already knew that didn’t we how to design navigation and breadcrumbs etc Krug insists on the importance of usability testing one chapter is actually a cookbook on how to conduct user tests without getting top heavy on the matter This recent republication also includes a chapter on designing for mobile and accessibilityA very enjoyable casual and oftentimes fun read that the staff at Goodreads should consider rereading from time to time a word to the wise is enoughThus far I'd say our old bookahs are still usable than anything digital or aren’t they

  4. Katelyn Jenkins Katelyn Jenkins says:

    uick thorough and to the point as it suggests Even inspired me to write a review on the web I don't even NEED to think twice to say this was a VERY GOOD e^3 readIt really is a book that can stand the test of time though all three iterations it keeps the tone and message good web design starts with instinct of the userKrug's book focuses on web usability fundamentals of good design and user experience testing Every web designer should get their hands on this as it is a reference for the mind about the mind give it a go it will have you thinking differently

  5. Sean Besser Sean Besser says:

    MUST READ for anyone with any say over the look feel of a commercial web page designers managers marketing people executives etc It's a uick and easy read and is like having my own web usability consultant Goodreads and LOTS of other sites should have their managment teams read this

  6. Mohamed Mohamed says:

    a great guideline for anyone who is interested in designing websites and products full of great examples and clear explanations BUT the book is a little bit outdated especially the mobile view part

  7. Graham Herrli Graham Herrli says:

    I was predisposed in favor of this book because it's the most voted for on the UX Stack Exchange It wasn't all I'd hoped it would be If this were the first text about usability I'd read I might have gotten out of it As it was the overwhelming majority of the topics presented seemed patently obvious to meOne thing this book has going for it is its brevity Before agreeing to publish a second edition Krug insisted upon first discovering what could be removed from the first edition so that no extra length would be added Rather than writing about details of debates relevant only to people completely immersed in usability he aims to convey the most essential concepts of the usability field as briefly as possible In this he succeeds The book is a clear introduction to some of the most important principles of the field However it glosses over them without going into depthPerhaps the most useful part of the book is a transcript of a sample usability test including what to say and do at the beginning of the test The introduction says that this chapter was abridged from three chapters in an earlier version of the book and some of the content was moved to Krug's site and expanded upon in a later book which I am now interested in readingSome other less useful things this book says areview spoiler The function of every element on the page should be as obvious as possible Aim to make things self evident but make them self explanatory at the very least Expect users to skim satisfice and muddle through pages Designers should make it easy to skim and make it so that users have to muddle as little as possible Use a clear visual hierarchy to help users find things faster Don't go against conventions unless your change brings a significant and easy to learn improvement Assume that every element is visual noise Use navigation elements not just to show people how to find what they're looking for but also to give them a sense of where they are and what else the site contains Navigation should be consistently laid out through all the levels of the site not just the top two Navigation elements particularly those showing the location of the current page should stick out Tabs connecting to the pages below are strong navigational elements All headers and labels should be clearly associated visually with the elements they relate to framing those elements Make sure that the homepage conveys the big picture It should tell what the site is about Use taglines rather than mottos next to site logos Tell what the site does not what it's ideals are The navigation should be the same on all pages except for the homepage and pages with forms Avoid the Tragedy of the Commons that occurs when too many things are added to the homepage All departments will want homepage links but too many homepage links will devalue the homepage The sections of the book about the homepage are decreasing in importance owing to the decreasing number of users actually landing on site home pages You shouldn't expect any one feature to be the best way of doing something for all users or a mythic Average User; instead focus on whether it creates a good experience for users who encounter it in its current context Focus groups are for initial planning; usability tests are for iterative improvement Test early informally and often This way you can improve the product and encounter issues in later tests that weren't evident until issues from the first test were resolved You can set up an inexpensive yet effective usability lab by placing a camcorder monitoring the screen in one room leading to a TV displaying the video to stakeholders in another room Use a screen recorder as well Before you have a working prototype run tests on a couple of sites with similar features or functionality to get a sense of what works well about them Be considerate of the user Try to have their best interests at heart To help make a site accessible to people with disabilities first make sure it's usable for people without disabilities Several small tweaks in the code can drastically improve accessibility hide spoiler

  8. Sandro Sandro says:

    What I liked The simple language used to explain normally complex matter; The good humour examples and metaphors the writer uses to explain things They really workNow the bad parts I find the information in the book to be a little too simplistic and common sense Even for people with only interest on the area of web usability they may find that they already know or at least thought in a very similar way when they browse daily; I understand that this isn't a scientific book and the author does refer to Nielsen a couple of times but all in all the knowledge in this book comes directly from the writer's mind with very little scientific sources to confirm what it's being said; Even the second edition is from 2005 almost 8 years have passed and most of the webpage elements he focus on the book aren't really that used any Still this isn't the author's fault Books age and so does the content they possess

  9. Muthazhagu Palanisamy Muthazhagu Palanisamy says:

    This book is what it states a common sense approach to web usabilityThe book lays bare the facts that 1 Users do not read the text in a web page2 Users muddle through a web page no matter how well thought out the layout and menus areAnd as a designer your task is to take these two facts into account when designing your websiteThe author Steve Krug is very perceptive While this is evident throughout the book what did it for me was the footnote about the Site ID being on the top right corner in web pages with right to left languages and his comment about inconsistent navigation options in many sites once you are two or three pages deep The first one is a nice call out the second I've been burnt by it so many timesThe section that talks about how to resolve design people problems when members of different teams prefer one design over another is a life saver for any Project Development Product Manager It clearly brings the focus back to the problem are we doing the right thing for the intended users of this websiteThe graphic showing what a webpage means to a CEO Developer Designer and Marketing nails each group's perspective on the headThe difference between a focus group and a usability testing team is explained wellThe chapters on usability testing is a must read for all A teams The table showing how much it would cost to do Get it and task based usability testing is very concise and useful I would recommend taking this no frills approach; a part of my org's development methodologyThat said the book is roughly ten years old The principles no doubt still hold good But it would be nice to see an updated version that talks about 1 The proliferation of social media and how to design for that2 Web based Enterprise application UI design#2 above is closer to home for me Type of uestion that I would like to be tackled In web based Enterprise apps that specifically deal with a particular vertical say Insurance how much can you assume that the user knows about the domain and conseuently how does that affect your designThe book is well laid out and you can see evidence of the author eating his own dog food The footnotes offer interesting segues sometimes not about web usability and the Recommended Reading section is a big plus It is an easy read at a little under 200 pages no reason your web dev team can't find time to read and re read it

  10. Chad Warner Chad Warner says:

    An excellent introduction to creating usable websites As the title states every website’s design and functionality should be so simple that people barely need to think to use it The book’s 2nd edition is from 2005 so some examples are dated but the concepts are uite relevant This was a fun read due to its straightforward style and Krug’s humorWhen I started looking for web design books Steve Krug’s classic on web usability freuently appeared at the top of most lists along with Designing with Web Standards by Jeffrey Zeldman see my review I highly recommend both booksSteve Krug’s Laws of UsabilityFirst Law Don’t make me think Make things obvious and self evident or at least self explanatory People scan; they don’t read People choose the first reasonable option People muddle through things rather than figure them outSecond Law It doesn't matter how many times I have to click as long as each click is a mindless unambiguous choice Make choices mindless for ease of useThird Law Get rid of half the words on each page then get rid of half of what's left Be ruthlessly conciseUsability testingTest early and often Test with 3 or 4 users Have each user think out loud as they use the site Use a screen recorder to record the session for reference Fix any problems then test again Review the results as soon as possibleAdditional notesNavigation helps users find things tells them where they are reveals content and tells how to use the site It must be good enough to help people who land on any pageThe home page should have a personable lively tagline conveying a value proposition The home page also needs a short scannable welcome blurb describing the siteKnow what people want and make those things obvious and easyOnly ask for information necessary to complete the transactionOnly make a site look good if it’s not at the expense of making it work well

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *