Heureux comme un Danois ePUB Ð Heureux comme Kindle

Heureux comme un Danois ePUB Ð Heureux comme Kindle


10 thoughts on “Heureux comme un Danois

  1. Diane S ☔ Diane S ☔ says:

    35 I love reading about the way people live in other countries how they think what they believe This was a relatively short book but packed full of information Why are they so happy? So much so that this country is rated first in the worldAfter reading and I enjoyed the layout of this book I think I live in the wrong country The Danes seem to exemplify all of the characteristics I try to follow that I believe Integrity honesty togetherness importance of family time and Reminded me of the values of my grandparents and father in law of those of the greatest generation One didn't take things for free one worked even two jobs if necessary to take care of their families they pitched in and helped their neighbors didn't cheat didn't steal didn't try to keep up with the Joneses all old fashioned values that seems to have gone by the wayside The only lack was family time child raising was mostly left to the mothers but not so in Denmark there is racial euality in this country that the United States has not yet attained One part stated that 47% of the people used bicycles as their primary mode of transportation Many of the members of Parliament even cycle to work Have a hard time imagining our Congressional people even cycling a few blocks One thing I might have trouble with is the topless sunbathing on lunch hours much frowned on here we are not as comfortable with our bodies as are the DanesThey do have one of the highest tax rates but so much is provided for free that the majority of the people believe this is a bargain are happy to do their share as long as everyone else is cheaters frowned on mightily She does also point out a few other negatives but on the whole I was uite impressed with the country and its people


  2. Robin Robin says:

    Although this book is about Danish societal values the 10 “secret” principles can also be applied to one’s personal life to become content Author Rydahl grew up in Denmark and moved to Paris at age 18 to pursue her dream career Raised to be self reliant practical and to appreciate others she tried several jobs before finding her ideal career and lifestyle Her parents in typical Danish fashion did not interfere with her decisions and encouraged her to become the person that she wanted to be The 10 Danish valuesprinciples are as follows trusting others choosing education relevant to the individual independence and freedom of choice eual opportunity regardless family income life dreams tempered with realistic expectations solidarity and respect for others healthy work life balance seeking job satisfaction rather than high income modesty about one’s achievements and eual opportunity and compensation among genders Happy as a Dane is part memoir and part social analysis It implies that readers can increase their happiness by identifying areas in which their attitudes or life situations can be improved and then applying the relevant principles The book is short and easy to read It is not a step by step process to become happier Instead readers can choose whether to employ the Danish principle of self reliance to up their life game or simply learn about life and values in DenmarkThree things that I particularly like about this book 1 Although the book is about Danish values in the last chapter Rydahl reviews each happiness principle and gives examples of how they’ve been used elsewhere in the world for example in China Pakistan Canada and Bangladesh 2 At the very end Rydahl applies the principles to list ten ways to make one’s personal life happier These include ignoring society’s standards in favor of self expression not comparing oneself to others being honest with oneself always having a Plan B choosing one’s battles living in the present and loving others 3 Rydahl cites her research in the endnotes backing up her statements with sourcesThis uick read will interest readers who want to create a happier egalitarian society Seekers of increased personal happiness will also enjoy it


  3. S S says:

    The 3rd one I have read on this topic what can I say? It is interesting usually this rates the lowest Her list of reasons Danes rate as happy rings true though I don't see that they were in any way secrets So there is that And she tries to be evenhanded though this sometimes detracts from the points she is trying to makeHowever I had a hard time relegating the fact that the author left as soon as she could and chooses to live somewhere else yes she has legitimate reasons but it still takes away from any credibilityOverall though the worst thing about this book is the writing style For a book that harps on modesty it comes across as uncomfortably smug The order of topics could have been better leading to less need for the but we'll talk about that later bit that came much too often The statistics are random and all over the map 20% of the 90% of those who read it agree It just came across as a pretentious attempt to capitalize on a trend There are much genuine attempts available which is why it became a trend in the first place


  4. Kris Kris says:

    Interesting but not earth shattering This might have been better as an article But there is some good information It is a relatively short read and it probably could have been condensed even to make the information impactful


  5. Madeleine (Top Shelf Text) Madeleine (Top Shelf Text) says:

    I found this book interesting but after reading I felt it would be better off as a long article instead The 10 secrets to Danish esue happiness are summarized in the back of the book so it would have been just as effective to read just that summary rather than the whole book


  6. Madelyn Flammia Madelyn Flammia says:

    An interesting perspective on Danish culture and why the Danes are so happy Very enjoyable


  7. Ibrahim Niftiyev Ibrahim Niftiyev says:

    I learned a lot of things from this book On one hand it encourages you to change your approach to the welfare state on the other hand it really gives vivid examples about the particular cases related to the discussion object Reading about Denmark and arguing about the universally human stuff was enjoyable The style is clear and straightforward I would say it is an important book for developing countries because the author explains various things which are extremely important to the developing countries Finally I would say there are a lot of things which is common sense so it is not a thought revolution The expectations should be on a realistic level


  8. Amanda Amanda says:

    I am interested in this topic but this book despite being only around 130 pages was slow going The writing was dry the material was not particularly interesting and it offered no new insights into the topic Also although Danish the author left the country decades ago and has chosen to live in France which sort of undermines the message Try The Year of Living Danishly by Helen Russell instead It covers the same ground but with some personality


  9. Peter Herrmann Peter Herrmann says:

    All her points make sense But many of them are easier said than done For instance in the conclusion 'know yourself' I'm 72 years old but still haven't uite figured that one out Have to wonder if I'd be happier having been born and raised in Denmark But as the author herself admits not every Dane is necessarily happy


  10. Sunny Sunny says:

    Straightforward common sense advice on living a good life


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Heureux comme un Danois [Reading] ➻ Heureux comme un Danois Author Malene Rydahl – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk For decades Denmark has ranked at the top of the world’s happiness surveys How is it that these 56 million Danes are so content when they live in a country that is dark and cold nine months of the y For decades Denmark has ranked at the top of the world’s happiness surveys How is it that these million Danes are so content when Heureux comme Kindle - they live in a country that is dark and cold nine months of the year and where income taxes are at almost percent At a time when talk across the Western world is focused on unemployment woes government overreach and anti taxation lobbies our Danish counterparts seem to breathe a healthier and fresher air Interweaving anecdotes and research Malene Rydahl explores how the values of trust education and a healthy work life balance with purpose—to name just a few—contribute to a “happy” population From eye opening stories about open air vegetable stands to babies safely left unattended while parents have coffee to very generous paternity leave policies Rydahl provides tips that we can all apply to our daily lives regardless of where we live.

  • Paperback
  • 144 pages
  • Heureux comme un Danois
  • Malene Rydahl
  • English
  • 08 March 2014
  • 9780393608922

About the Author: Malene Rydahl

Malene Rydahl is born and raised in Denmark and has been based in Paris for the past nineteen yearsShe is the author of the book Heureux comme Kindle - “ heureux comme un danois” as happy as a Dane published by Grasset in April For decades Denmark has ranked at the top the world’s happiness index Interweaving personal anecdotes and careful research her book steers clear of any preaching and tackles the osten.


10 thoughts on “Heureux comme un Danois

  1. Diane S ☔ Diane S ☔ says:

    35 I love reading about the way people live in other countries how they think what they believe This was a relatively short book but packed full of information Why are they so happy? So much so that this country is rated first in the worldAfter reading and I enjoyed the layout of this book I think I live in the wrong country The Danes seem to exemplify all of the characteristics I try to follow that I believe Integrity honesty togetherness importance of family time and Reminded me of the values of my grandparents and father in law of those of the greatest generation One didn't take things for free one worked even two jobs if necessary to take care of their families they pitched in and helped their neighbors didn't cheat didn't steal didn't try to keep up with the Joneses all old fashioned values that seems to have gone by the wayside The only lack was family time child raising was mostly left to the mothers but not so in Denmark there is racial euality in this country that the United States has not yet attained One part stated that 47% of the people used bicycles as their primary mode of transportation Many of the members of Parliament even cycle to work Have a hard time imagining our Congressional people even cycling a few blocks One thing I might have trouble with is the topless sunbathing on lunch hours much frowned on here we are not as comfortable with our bodies as are the DanesThey do have one of the highest tax rates but so much is provided for free that the majority of the people believe this is a bargain are happy to do their share as long as everyone else is cheaters frowned on mightily She does also point out a few other negatives but on the whole I was uite impressed with the country and its people

  2. Robin Robin says:

    Although this book is about Danish societal values the 10 “secret” principles can also be applied to one’s personal life to become content Author Rydahl grew up in Denmark and moved to Paris at age 18 to pursue her dream career Raised to be self reliant practical and to appreciate others she tried several jobs before finding her ideal career and lifestyle Her parents in typical Danish fashion did not interfere with her decisions and encouraged her to become the person that she wanted to be The 10 Danish valuesprinciples are as follows trusting others choosing education relevant to the individual independence and freedom of choice eual opportunity regardless family income life dreams tempered with realistic expectations solidarity and respect for others healthy work life balance seeking job satisfaction rather than high income modesty about one’s achievements and eual opportunity and compensation among genders Happy as a Dane is part memoir and part social analysis It implies that readers can increase their happiness by identifying areas in which their attitudes or life situations can be improved and then applying the relevant principles The book is short and easy to read It is not a step by step process to become happier Instead readers can choose whether to employ the Danish principle of self reliance to up their life game or simply learn about life and values in DenmarkThree things that I particularly like about this book 1 Although the book is about Danish values in the last chapter Rydahl reviews each happiness principle and gives examples of how they’ve been used elsewhere in the world for example in China Pakistan Canada and Bangladesh 2 At the very end Rydahl applies the principles to list ten ways to make one’s personal life happier These include ignoring society’s standards in favor of self expression not comparing oneself to others being honest with oneself always having a Plan B choosing one’s battles living in the present and loving others 3 Rydahl cites her research in the endnotes backing up her statements with sourcesThis uick read will interest readers who want to create a happier egalitarian society Seekers of increased personal happiness will also enjoy it

  3. S S says:

    The 3rd one I have read on this topic what can I say? It is interesting usually this rates the lowest Her list of reasons Danes rate as happy rings true though I don't see that they were in any way secrets So there is that And she tries to be evenhanded though this sometimes detracts from the points she is trying to makeHowever I had a hard time relegating the fact that the author left as soon as she could and chooses to live somewhere else yes she has legitimate reasons but it still takes away from any credibilityOverall though the worst thing about this book is the writing style For a book that harps on modesty it comes across as uncomfortably smug The order of topics could have been better leading to less need for the but we'll talk about that later bit that came much too often The statistics are random and all over the map 20% of the 90% of those who read it agree It just came across as a pretentious attempt to capitalize on a trend There are much genuine attempts available which is why it became a trend in the first place

  4. Kris Kris says:

    Interesting but not earth shattering This might have been better as an article But there is some good information It is a relatively short read and it probably could have been condensed even to make the information impactful

  5. Madeleine (Top Shelf Text) Madeleine (Top Shelf Text) says:

    I found this book interesting but after reading I felt it would be better off as a long article instead The 10 secrets to Danish esue happiness are summarized in the back of the book so it would have been just as effective to read just that summary rather than the whole book

  6. Madelyn Flammia Madelyn Flammia says:

    An interesting perspective on Danish culture and why the Danes are so happy Very enjoyable

  7. Ibrahim Niftiyev Ibrahim Niftiyev says:

    I learned a lot of things from this book On one hand it encourages you to change your approach to the welfare state on the other hand it really gives vivid examples about the particular cases related to the discussion object Reading about Denmark and arguing about the universally human stuff was enjoyable The style is clear and straightforward I would say it is an important book for developing countries because the author explains various things which are extremely important to the developing countries Finally I would say there are a lot of things which is common sense so it is not a thought revolution The expectations should be on a realistic level

  8. Amanda Amanda says:

    I am interested in this topic but this book despite being only around 130 pages was slow going The writing was dry the material was not particularly interesting and it offered no new insights into the topic Also although Danish the author left the country decades ago and has chosen to live in France which sort of undermines the message Try The Year of Living Danishly by Helen Russell instead It covers the same ground but with some personality

  9. Peter Herrmann Peter Herrmann says:

    All her points make sense But many of them are easier said than done For instance in the conclusion 'know yourself' I'm 72 years old but still haven't uite figured that one out Have to wonder if I'd be happier having been born and raised in Denmark But as the author herself admits not every Dane is necessarily happy

  10. Sunny Sunny says:

    Straightforward common sense advice on living a good life

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *