No Other World ePUB ´ No Other eBook è

No Other World ePUB ´ No Other eBook è


No Other World ❰PDF / Epub❯ ★ No Other World Author Rahul Mehta – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk From the author of the prize winning collection uarantine an insightful compelling debut novel set in rural America and India in the 1980s and `90s part coming of age story about a gay Indian American From the author of the prize winning collection uarantine an insightful compelling debut novel set in rural America and India in the s and `s part coming of age story about a gay Indian American boy part family saga about an immigrant family's struggles each to find a sense of belonging identity and hopeIn a rural community in Western New York twelve year old Kiran Shah the American born son of Indian immigrants longingly observes his prototypically American neighbors the Bells He attends school with Kelly No Other eBook è Bell but he’s powerfully drawn—in a way he does not yet understand—to her charismatic father Chris Kiran’s yearnings echo his parents’ bewilderment as they try to adjust to a new world His father Nishit Shah a successful doctor is haunted by thoughts of the brother he left behind His mother Shanti struggles to accept a life with a man she did not choose—her marriage to Nishit was arranged—and her growing attachment to an American man Kiran is close to his older sister Preeti—until an unexpected threat and an unfathomable betrayal drive a wedge between them that will reverberate through their livesAs he leaves childhood behind Kiran finds himself perpetually on the outside—as an Indian American torn between two cultures and as a gay man in a homophobic society In the wake of an emotional breakdown he travels to India where he forms an intense bond with a teenage hijra a member of India's ancient transgender community With her help Kiran begins to pull together the pieces of his broken past Sweeping and emotionally complex No Other World is a haunting meditation on love belonging and forgiveness that explores the line between our responsibilities to our families and to ourselves the difficult choices we make and the painful cost of claiming our true selves.


10 thoughts on “No Other World

  1. Jessica Woodbury Jessica Woodbury says:

    This one started as a 4 star but ended up as a 35 for me I love the writing I love the family but ultimately it didn't uite gel for me the way I'd hoped The book is centered on an Indian American family in a small town in upstate New York At first you get a hint of family secrets buried beneath the surface as 12 year old Kiran cannot stop staring at another family's house The book has micro flash forwards revealing in an aside that this character grows up to be gay and that character dies in the World Trade Center A few notable times in the Shah family are illuminated but ultimately the book leaves Kiran largely unexplored and the small glimpses into the minds of the characters only left me wanting and feeling unfulfilled The same goes for Pooja the hijra a trans woman and recognized third gender in India who is introduced early on abandoned for most of the book and then comes back at the end leaving uestions than answers about who she is and what her life is likeStill it's a beautifully written novel with a sharp eye on religion racism and Good companion book to A SLEEPWALKER'S GUIDE TO DANCING


  2. Janani Janani says:

    35This book started out well for me Mehta's got a descriptive writing style that reminded me of Rakesh Satyal Things I liked The characters are flawed in a way that goes hand in hand with the plot I thought he did a really good job tackling anti trans bigotry both within and outside of the ueer community in the third part of the book Loved that Shanti was portrayed as a woman that acknowledged her sexuality which almost never happens for women of color Things I didn't like All of the various characters arcs are left abruptly and I was left wanting to know so much about all of them especially Pooja and Kiran I was also mildly annoyed by the brown person lusting after white dude tropes that occurs not once but twice in the narrative Overall it's well written and handles subjects of religion racism ueerness within the context of an immigrant story pretty well


  3. Greg Greg says:

    Finally A gay coming of age novel that breaks away from the standard tropes and conventions in a good wayThe Good Well rounded simultaneously flawed virtuous characters that support the plot throughout the book Descriptive writing style; really great imagery and similes particularly loved how he compares makeup and clothing to armor Juxtapositions abound in great ways old world vs new religious observers butting heads 1st generation Americans vs 2nd gen immigrant vs born citizen tragic death vs new life royalty vs poverty masculine vs feminine etc Symbolism foreshadowing and other well executed literary tools some probably lost on me as a Westerner Female characters who have a sexuality as opposed to being sexualized A substantial focus on third gender characters giving them influence on the plot as wellMy only complaint is that I felt as a reader the first revealed love triangle stole the thunder from the second which was also very important I'd be ok if the first one was it I was also disappointed that both revolved around the Indian American family lusting after hometown white dudes but that could also be a significant part of the immigrant experience I just couldn't relate toRead this one if you're looking for some engaging variety in your gay novels


  4. Doug Doug says:

    Mehta's first novel after his award winning short story collection uarantine fulfills the promise of his shorter work Although it contains some well worn tropes from both the gay coming of age novel and the Indian immigrant in America story there are enough fresh and interesting details to lend it some uniueness Some structural and temporal wonkiness for example Prabhu is introduced as coming to America due to his grief over his wife dying in childbirth leading one to believe his son is newly born only to learn several chapters later that the boy is actually 10 at the time and an annoying withholding of information so it can be revealed at the most opportune time prevented this from being a full 5 star read for me Also the most intriguing character the young transgender 'hijra' Pooja isn't introduced until the final section of her story would have gone a long way towards enhancing the book


  5. Shweta Keswani Shweta Keswani says:

    The book is extremely outdated indeed it is from another time but then the writing needs to have depth to it the characters should have been sharper to at least make it an interesting read first half was manageable but after that it went down at a amazing speed The climax well there wasn’t worth mentioning Absolute waste of time


  6. Sivan Sivan says:

    I wanted to like this book for the plot but I felt like Mehta's narration spoke too much gave too much to me Personally I don't like the sensation of being spoon fed; the characters felt overly explained in a way that made them two dimensional and unlikeable


  7. ActiveUSCitizen ActiveUSCitizen says:

    Kiran’s yearnings echo his parents’ bewilderment as they try to adjust to a new world His father Nishit Shah a successful doctor is haunted by thoughts of the brother he left behind His mother Shanti struggles to accept a life with a man she did not choose—her marriage to Nishit was arranged—and her growing attachment to an American man Kiran is close to his older sister Preeti—until an unexpected threat and an unfathomable betrayal drive a wedge between them that will reverberate through their lives


  8. Andrew Peters Andrew Peters says:

    When I read the Lambda Literary Foundation's review mentioning a gay Indian protagonist growing up in Western New York in the 1980s I think it took me all of thirty seconds to buy it on iTunes I was a gay kid growing up in WNY Buffalo in the 1980s and I've enjoyed Southeast Asian authors Shyam Selvadurai So beyond the literary merits of Mehta's debut novel the story was a bit of a homecoming for me The setting rang true from poppunkrock references childhood games Smear the ueer beef on weck to hanging out at water towers and the terrifying homophobia of junior and senior high schoolI also appreciated the complicated portrait of the main character Kiran he gets the most scene time and is cited as MC; though it should be noted this is a story of many rotating narratives I've certainly read many gay coming of age novels portraying both the cruelty and self loathing of gay adolescence as well as those that explore the intersectionality double jeopardy spoiled identity of LGBT teens of color Mehta captures that dilemma that journey in a brutal insightful and honest manner that I have not seen before which I think makes his novel a real accomplishment I have to include my favorite passage regarding Kiran's avoidance of his Indian peers in college“To someone else someone like Kiran’s father Kiran’s actions might have seemed harsh and exclusionary evidence even of some internalized racism and they might have been right though that’s not how Kiran saw it For him his actions were self preservationist preemptive The reason Kiran wanted nothing to do with these Indians was because he believed—and he believed this in the deepest place of his heart—that if they knew him really knew him they would want nothing to do with him”I enjoyed the book but I was not as enchanted by the narrative structure many rotating POVs combined with rotating time frames For me it left me not understanding and relating fully to some of the characters as well as feeling like both past and present weren't fully explored As an example and I many be dense here but a repeated riddle of the story why is young Kiran staring at a neighbors house every day after school? remained an enigma for meThen nitpicking while much of the settinghistorical period rang true I fell out of the story a bit geographically as characters drive from Elmira to Rochester to Corning as though they are neighboring towns While it's true that in rural areas people have to cover a lot of distance in their daily lives I didn't uite buy it in this case driving two hours for groceries or to go to the mall?


  9. Ming Ming says:

    This book was a mixed bag The climax was anti climatic More troubling the colonial mentality that when there was a choice for a romantic interest every time a white person was preferable This occurs in at least 3 instancesThere are a few beautiful passagesOver the years Bharat sometimes wondered what his life might have looked like had they immigrated Now in Kiran's room he was collecting clues not only about his American cousin but about his own alternate American selfEven after the entire wall had been replastered and repainted Kamala felt sure she could see the faint outline of where the window had been Kamala's mother might have thought she was filling a hole but for Kamala she was creating one a constant reminder of what was once there even if what had been there was itself a hole to begin withThe cousins left their mark on the land their blood in the dirt their sweat slicking the trunks and branches and boughs of climbed trees Their histories were inscribed here the double helixes of the DNA vining up across around every bit of land indelible reminders for Kiran of the glorious World of Cousins in which he'd spent his youthKiran's first glimpse of Bharat was of him on the platform slumped in such a way that it seemed to Kiran that it was just a matter of time before gravity had its way and made Bharat fully and forever part of the pavement But when Kiran approached Bharat's whole body transformed He rushed toward Kiran smiling an enormous smile and took Kiran's hand took his whole arm shaking it firmly almost maniacally Kiran recognized in Bharat's huge eyes a state Kiran himself knew well desperation


  10. cheryl cheryl says:

    This is a story about family culture and identity Kiran is born to a couple who immigrated to America from India in search of the American dream In some ways they have it They are doing fine and living in a nice town in Western NY but Kiran feels like he doesn't uite belong He uestions how he fits both in his nation and in his own home The book also introduces us to the uncle who stayed behind in India and eventually to his son as well providing the reader different eyes on the story Although Kiran is the protagonist we also see stories he doesn't including his mom's brief affair and his cousin's struggle during his brief visit to the US As Kiran grows and becomes aware of his own identity as a gay man other uestions arise that make the study in identity even broaderI liked the roundness of the characters here We see imperfections and secrets and we see how even those who look at ease feel a bit lost I enjoyed this book but it didn't stay with me much beyond the last place I also felt like a few of the storylinesthe early mention of one girl's death on 911 the key moments in Kiran's trip to Indiafelt forced into the story like ideas the writer wanted to be sure to get on the pageThis DID feel real at many points and I think it would connect on a deeper level with first generation Americans and also with those who know what it feels like to be gay in a culture that won't utter the word Three and a half stars Provided to me by the publisher in return for an honest review


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10 thoughts on “No Other World

  1. Jessica Woodbury Jessica Woodbury says:

    This one started as a 4 star but ended up as a 35 for me I love the writing I love the family but ultimately it didn't uite gel for me the way I'd hoped The book is centered on an Indian American family in a small town in upstate New York At first you get a hint of family secrets buried beneath the surface as 12 year old Kiran cannot stop staring at another family's house The book has micro flash forwards revealing in an aside that this character grows up to be gay and that character dies in the World Trade Center A few notable times in the Shah family are illuminated but ultimately the book leaves Kiran largely unexplored and the small glimpses into the minds of the characters only left me wanting and feeling unfulfilled The same goes for Pooja the hijra a trans woman and recognized third gender in India who is introduced early on abandoned for most of the book and then comes back at the end leaving uestions than answers about who she is and what her life is likeStill it's a beautifully written novel with a sharp eye on religion racism and Good companion book to A SLEEPWALKER'S GUIDE TO DANCING

  2. Janani Janani says:

    35This book started out well for me Mehta's got a descriptive writing style that reminded me of Rakesh Satyal Things I liked The characters are flawed in a way that goes hand in hand with the plot I thought he did a really good job tackling anti trans bigotry both within and outside of the ueer community in the third part of the book Loved that Shanti was portrayed as a woman that acknowledged her sexuality which almost never happens for women of color Things I didn't like All of the various characters arcs are left abruptly and I was left wanting to know so much about all of them especially Pooja and Kiran I was also mildly annoyed by the brown person lusting after white dude tropes that occurs not once but twice in the narrative Overall it's well written and handles subjects of religion racism ueerness within the context of an immigrant story pretty well

  3. Greg Greg says:

    Finally A gay coming of age novel that breaks away from the standard tropes and conventions in a good wayThe Good Well rounded simultaneously flawed virtuous characters that support the plot throughout the book Descriptive writing style; really great imagery and similes particularly loved how he compares makeup and clothing to armor Juxtapositions abound in great ways old world vs new religious observers butting heads 1st generation Americans vs 2nd gen immigrant vs born citizen tragic death vs new life royalty vs poverty masculine vs feminine etc Symbolism foreshadowing and other well executed literary tools some probably lost on me as a Westerner Female characters who have a sexuality as opposed to being sexualized A substantial focus on third gender characters giving them influence on the plot as wellMy only complaint is that I felt as a reader the first revealed love triangle stole the thunder from the second which was also very important I'd be ok if the first one was it I was also disappointed that both revolved around the Indian American family lusting after hometown white dudes but that could also be a significant part of the immigrant experience I just couldn't relate toRead this one if you're looking for some engaging variety in your gay novels

  4. Doug Doug says:

    Mehta's first novel after his award winning short story collection uarantine fulfills the promise of his shorter work Although it contains some well worn tropes from both the gay coming of age novel and the Indian immigrant in America story there are enough fresh and interesting details to lend it some uniueness Some structural and temporal wonkiness for example Prabhu is introduced as coming to America due to his grief over his wife dying in childbirth leading one to believe his son is newly born only to learn several chapters later that the boy is actually 10 at the time and an annoying withholding of information so it can be revealed at the most opportune time prevented this from being a full 5 star read for me Also the most intriguing character the young transgender 'hijra' Pooja isn't introduced until the final section of her story would have gone a long way towards enhancing the book

  5. Shweta Keswani Shweta Keswani says:

    The book is extremely outdated indeed it is from another time but then the writing needs to have depth to it the characters should have been sharper to at least make it an interesting read first half was manageable but after that it went down at a amazing speed The climax well there wasn’t worth mentioning Absolute waste of time

  6. Sivan Sivan says:

    I wanted to like this book for the plot but I felt like Mehta's narration spoke too much gave too much to me Personally I don't like the sensation of being spoon fed; the characters felt overly explained in a way that made them two dimensional and unlikeable

  7. ActiveUSCitizen ActiveUSCitizen says:

    Kiran’s yearnings echo his parents’ bewilderment as they try to adjust to a new world His father Nishit Shah a successful doctor is haunted by thoughts of the brother he left behind His mother Shanti struggles to accept a life with a man she did not choose—her marriage to Nishit was arranged—and her growing attachment to an American man Kiran is close to his older sister Preeti—until an unexpected threat and an unfathomable betrayal drive a wedge between them that will reverberate through their lives

  8. Andrew Peters Andrew Peters says:

    When I read the Lambda Literary Foundation's review mentioning a gay Indian protagonist growing up in Western New York in the 1980s I think it took me all of thirty seconds to buy it on iTunes I was a gay kid growing up in WNY Buffalo in the 1980s and I've enjoyed Southeast Asian authors Shyam Selvadurai So beyond the literary merits of Mehta's debut novel the story was a bit of a homecoming for me The setting rang true from poppunkrock references childhood games Smear the ueer beef on weck to hanging out at water towers and the terrifying homophobia of junior and senior high schoolI also appreciated the complicated portrait of the main character Kiran he gets the most scene time and is cited as MC; though it should be noted this is a story of many rotating narratives I've certainly read many gay coming of age novels portraying both the cruelty and self loathing of gay adolescence as well as those that explore the intersectionality double jeopardy spoiled identity of LGBT teens of color Mehta captures that dilemma that journey in a brutal insightful and honest manner that I have not seen before which I think makes his novel a real accomplishment I have to include my favorite passage regarding Kiran's avoidance of his Indian peers in college“To someone else someone like Kiran’s father Kiran’s actions might have seemed harsh and exclusionary evidence even of some internalized racism and they might have been right though that’s not how Kiran saw it For him his actions were self preservationist preemptive The reason Kiran wanted nothing to do with these Indians was because he believed—and he believed this in the deepest place of his heart—that if they knew him really knew him they would want nothing to do with him”I enjoyed the book but I was not as enchanted by the narrative structure many rotating POVs combined with rotating time frames For me it left me not understanding and relating fully to some of the characters as well as feeling like both past and present weren't fully explored As an example and I many be dense here but a repeated riddle of the story why is young Kiran staring at a neighbors house every day after school? remained an enigma for meThen nitpicking while much of the settinghistorical period rang true I fell out of the story a bit geographically as characters drive from Elmira to Rochester to Corning as though they are neighboring towns While it's true that in rural areas people have to cover a lot of distance in their daily lives I didn't uite buy it in this case driving two hours for groceries or to go to the mall?

  9. Ming Ming says:

    This book was a mixed bag The climax was anti climatic More troubling the colonial mentality that when there was a choice for a romantic interest every time a white person was preferable This occurs in at least 3 instancesThere are a few beautiful passagesOver the years Bharat sometimes wondered what his life might have looked like had they immigrated Now in Kiran's room he was collecting clues not only about his American cousin but about his own alternate American selfEven after the entire wall had been replastered and repainted Kamala felt sure she could see the faint outline of where the window had been Kamala's mother might have thought she was filling a hole but for Kamala she was creating one a constant reminder of what was once there even if what had been there was itself a hole to begin withThe cousins left their mark on the land their blood in the dirt their sweat slicking the trunks and branches and boughs of climbed trees Their histories were inscribed here the double helixes of the DNA vining up across around every bit of land indelible reminders for Kiran of the glorious World of Cousins in which he'd spent his youthKiran's first glimpse of Bharat was of him on the platform slumped in such a way that it seemed to Kiran that it was just a matter of time before gravity had its way and made Bharat fully and forever part of the pavement But when Kiran approached Bharat's whole body transformed He rushed toward Kiran smiling an enormous smile and took Kiran's hand took his whole arm shaking it firmly almost maniacally Kiran recognized in Bharat's huge eyes a state Kiran himself knew well desperation

  10. cheryl cheryl says:

    This is a story about family culture and identity Kiran is born to a couple who immigrated to America from India in search of the American dream In some ways they have it They are doing fine and living in a nice town in Western NY but Kiran feels like he doesn't uite belong He uestions how he fits both in his nation and in his own home The book also introduces us to the uncle who stayed behind in India and eventually to his son as well providing the reader different eyes on the story Although Kiran is the protagonist we also see stories he doesn't including his mom's brief affair and his cousin's struggle during his brief visit to the US As Kiran grows and becomes aware of his own identity as a gay man other uestions arise that make the study in identity even broaderI liked the roundness of the characters here We see imperfections and secrets and we see how even those who look at ease feel a bit lost I enjoyed this book but it didn't stay with me much beyond the last place I also felt like a few of the storylinesthe early mention of one girl's death on 911 the key moments in Kiran's trip to Indiafelt forced into the story like ideas the writer wanted to be sure to get on the pageThis DID feel real at many points and I think it would connect on a deeper level with first generation Americans and also with those who know what it feels like to be gay in a culture that won't utter the word Three and a half stars Provided to me by the publisher in return for an honest review

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