So Pretty / Very Rotten Epub Ø / Very PDF Å So

So Pretty / Very Rotten Epub Ø / Very PDF Å So


So Pretty / Very Rotten [PDF] ✎ So Pretty / Very Rotten By Jane Mai – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk In a series of essays and comics that are at once academic and intimate cartoonists Jane Mai and An Nguyen delve into Lolita subculture and their relationship with it Empowering and beautiful but also In a / Very PDF Å series of essays and comics that are at once academic and intimate cartoonists Jane Mai and An Nguyen delve into Lolita subculture and their relationship with it Empowering and beautiful but also inescapably linked to consumerism the Rococo inspired fashion is indulgent and sublime pretty and rottenAn Nguyen is a cartoonist and illustrator based in Ottawa ON best known for her romantic comic series Open Spaces and Closed PlacesJane Mai is a freelance illustrator and comic artist from Brooklyn NYNovala Takemoto So Pretty Kindle - is a Japanese author fashion designer and prominent promoter of the Lolita lifestyle.

  • Paperback
  • 304 pages
  • So Pretty / Very Rotten
  • Jane Mai
  • English
  • 10 February 2016
  • 9781927668436

10 thoughts on “So Pretty / Very Rotten

  1. Maggie Gordon Maggie Gordon says:

    I didn't expect So PrettyVery Rotten to be so profoundly affecting given that I don't dress in lolita But it's commentary on fashion femininity and politics was uite astute and provided me with a lot of thoughtful ideas to reflect upon The book is a combination of essays and comics that seek to explore what lolita is and why people join this subculture However unlike so much of what I see on this style of fashion the focus is much deeper and darker than on just how cute the clothing is The title refers to the humanity of those into lolita that despite their perfect clothing the style can be a poignant rejection of social norms and gender expectations Lolita is about personal fulfillment It is about showing your weaknesses and your strength to the world at the same time It is a declaration that you will live for your own pleasure in a world that wants you to live for the pleasure of others So Pretty Very Rotten also digs into the imperfections of the people who wear this clothing What drives them sometimes too far into capitalistic and competitive frenzies? What problems are people hiding under their pretty lace and ribbons? But also what power does the fashion give them? Mai and Nguyen play with the contradictions felt by those who wear lolita and the complexities of this intricate subculture It is wonderful to see such a deep exploration of a world of femininity in such a careful nuanced approach Instead of dismissing lolita as a fade or a phase Mai and Nguyen argue that it represents an important mode of resistance that should be taken seriously Definitely not what I was expecting but a compelling and well researched read

  2. Juan Juan says:

    do you ever just feel seen

  3. Natalie (CuriousReader) Natalie (CuriousReader) says:

    Disclaimer The fashion called 'Lolita' has no known connection to Nabokov's LolitaSo Pretty Very Rotten is a combination of Jane Mai and An Nguyen's efforts in comic and essay form to explore different facets of lolita fashion While the comics could be enjoyed by lolita fans and others alike it'll likely ring especially true to either lolitas or people who're already familiar with the niche fashion style Lolita fashion is sort of a modern take on rococo fashion with a lot of different sub styles originating in Japan and eventually in recent years gaining international status The essays deal with among other topics; the origin of the fashion the meaning of clothes as identity and expression consumerism differences in the North American and Japanese community aspects of the fashion etc There's also an interview with and an essay written by Novala Takemoto well known as the author of the novel 'Kamikaze Girls' which features the most famous lolita in media to date MomokoWhile I enjoyed all of the comics I definitely personally liked An Nguyen's work better In Tomorrow An Nguyen explores loneliness and one young women's effort to fill a gap in her life with material things For me it also dealt with the contrasts between our ideals and dreams set against the reality of our lives and how we navigate those rifts Eternal Maidens and Ribbon Army I think deals beautifully both with the empowering feeling in free expression the right to love the things you love how friendships can build with access to certain communities It also kind of links back to the roots of lolita fashion that's part of a larger movement in Japan in which young women and girls played with self expression as a means to feel free This topic is also dealt with in the essays In general An Nguyen's comics are beautifully drawn have characters that feel realized and relatable even in such a short space of time and at the same time is story telling done right If the entire book was a collection of her comics I think this would've been a full star read for meI definitely enjoyed some of the essays a lot On the whole there's not much I didn't know before but it was still a lot of fun to read through this book Rather than being groundbreaking new information it felt like I was able to share something with someone else who's also had an interest in the same thing Like listening to a friend give you a different perspective on something you're already pretty well versed in I did really like seeing the contrasts between North AmericanWestern Lolitas to Japan and the talk of lolita vs otome for example in the essay Wavering bodies and Fluttering Minds as well as in general the talk around the function of lolita in people's lives Jane Mai's essay good at looking good I also personally really related to In general just a lot of fun to read and would especially recommend to people interested in the fashion or for An Nguyen's comics for anyone that likes comics with girls figuring out their identity friendship and girl power and lots of cute clothes

  4. Alenka Alenka says:

    I think I'm gonna get super on goodreads for a sec here Don't judge meI loved this book I'm a huge fan of Jane Mai's work but I've never read anything by An Nguyen before and now I'd really like to read because her research into Lolita culture was so wonderfully done accessible and enlightening The pair had a zine that teased the book that I got about a year ago so I had a very rough idea of what I was in for that this was going to be something empowering about women dressing for themselves but I was actually totally unprepared Nguyen often discusses how Lolitas Otomes and others view their style as genderless and dives deeply into the nuance of this clothing how it sometimes builds community sometimes is simply a way to find happiness sometimes unexpectedly allows wearers to express a kind of rottenness like a sweet beautiful cake left out a bit too long I am in a place where after a long struggle with clothing as it is connected to masculinity and femininity I am trying to decouple clothing from gender a concept stolen from Elizabeth Sweet's research on toys in order to feel comfortable when I walk through the world As a person who really isn't femme at all it felt so good so fascinating but even pivotal to read something like this Also the comics are really good often dark and communicate things about Lolita so brilliantly that can't uite be expressed in words Lolita after all is a visual thing just like comics

  5. Jaina Bee Jaina Bee says:

    I entered the book with curiosity about a subculture i really have nothing to do with and did not understand and exited the book floored wowed awed inspired and filled with so much respect for this movement and the statement Lolitas are making I had no idea how shunned and rejected Lolitas could be and what a statement of personal sovereignty Lolitas are making And the fact it has nothing at ALL to do with Nabokov or his famous character thank goodness The tricky issues of consumerism and aging and the sad reality of fashion history being so poorly archived all get airtime in this amazing collection

  6. Misty Misty says:

    This is a really fascinating look at Japanese lolita fashion cultureI wasn't very familiar with lolita before reading this Lolita is a frilly extremely labour intensive style inspired by European women's fashion of the 18th and 19th centuries It's presented as a self focused style whose goal is to empower the wearer which is sharply distinguished from styles which are meant to appeal to men or to society at large The essays in this collection draw from historical research and with lolita practitioners in Japan and the west in order to shed a light on the history of the style and what it means to its wearers An Nguyen one of the two authors comes from a sociological background and her analysis is well written and fascinatingThe essays are interspersed with artwork and comics which bring a personal perspective to the topic Jane Mai and An Nguyen's comics are a mixture of semi fictionalized personal stories fictional stories from the perspectives of western lolitas and fictionalized depictions of the lives of some of the Japanese lolitas who were interviewed for this project It's an unusual approach for this kind of book but it works extremely well There is also a lolita lookbook at the beginning of the book which does a good job of providing a visual overview of lolita styles for readers who are unfamiliarI definitely recommend this book to anyone who's interested in learning about this style and what it means to those who wear it

  7. Ksenia Ksenia says:

    thinking back about it i had a lot of hangups relating to women what it means to be a woman and what it means to present yourself as a woman this isn't to say i was very thorough in my reflection as a teen i was a shitlord as most teens are wont to be and frustrated and angry all the time without really knowing really exactly why Jane Mai in the essay 'Good at Looking Good' This book rules its the perfect mix of personal reflection and cultural criticism There's so much here for people curious about lolita fashion at all levels of experience There is enough explanation for un indoctrinated and enough niche for the fully immersed The essay and interview with Novala Takemoto were particular highlights And this is all before even talking about the comics

  8. grace grace says:

    Very informative much better than blurbs in books about wacky Japanese things As someone who knows a lot about lolita I still learned things and either way it's very interesting The comics were beautiful and touching LUV IT

  9. Tesni Rhys Tesni Rhys says:

    Resilience smashing the patriarchy via going against mainstream beauty standards dressing for yourself sisterhood community nonconformity to gender roles kindness towards yourself and others These are some topics I picked up from reading this graphic novel I really enjoyed it

  10. Derek Royal Derek Royal says:

    The comics are nice but the essays both Nguyen's and Mai's are what give this hybrid collection its impact Thoughtful and clarifying

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10 thoughts on “So Pretty / Very Rotten

  1. Maggie Gordon Maggie Gordon says:

    I didn't expect So PrettyVery Rotten to be so profoundly affecting given that I don't dress in lolita But it's commentary on fashion femininity and politics was uite astute and provided me with a lot of thoughtful ideas to reflect upon The book is a combination of essays and comics that seek to explore what lolita is and why people join this subculture However unlike so much of what I see on this style of fashion the focus is much deeper and darker than on just how cute the clothing is The title refers to the humanity of those into lolita that despite their perfect clothing the style can be a poignant rejection of social norms and gender expectations Lolita is about personal fulfillment It is about showing your weaknesses and your strength to the world at the same time It is a declaration that you will live for your own pleasure in a world that wants you to live for the pleasure of others So Pretty Very Rotten also digs into the imperfections of the people who wear this clothing What drives them sometimes too far into capitalistic and competitive frenzies? What problems are people hiding under their pretty lace and ribbons? But also what power does the fashion give them? Mai and Nguyen play with the contradictions felt by those who wear lolita and the complexities of this intricate subculture It is wonderful to see such a deep exploration of a world of femininity in such a careful nuanced approach Instead of dismissing lolita as a fade or a phase Mai and Nguyen argue that it represents an important mode of resistance that should be taken seriously Definitely not what I was expecting but a compelling and well researched read

  2. Juan Juan says:

    do you ever just feel seen

  3. Natalie (CuriousReader) Natalie (CuriousReader) says:

    Disclaimer The fashion called 'Lolita' has no known connection to Nabokov's LolitaSo Pretty Very Rotten is a combination of Jane Mai and An Nguyen's efforts in comic and essay form to explore different facets of lolita fashion While the comics could be enjoyed by lolita fans and others alike it'll likely ring especially true to either lolitas or people who're already familiar with the niche fashion style Lolita fashion is sort of a modern take on rococo fashion with a lot of different sub styles originating in Japan and eventually in recent years gaining international status The essays deal with among other topics; the origin of the fashion the meaning of clothes as identity and expression consumerism differences in the North American and Japanese community aspects of the fashion etc There's also an interview with and an essay written by Novala Takemoto well known as the author of the novel 'Kamikaze Girls' which features the most famous lolita in media to date MomokoWhile I enjoyed all of the comics I definitely personally liked An Nguyen's work better In Tomorrow An Nguyen explores loneliness and one young women's effort to fill a gap in her life with material things For me it also dealt with the contrasts between our ideals and dreams set against the reality of our lives and how we navigate those rifts Eternal Maidens and Ribbon Army I think deals beautifully both with the empowering feeling in free expression the right to love the things you love how friendships can build with access to certain communities It also kind of links back to the roots of lolita fashion that's part of a larger movement in Japan in which young women and girls played with self expression as a means to feel free This topic is also dealt with in the essays In general An Nguyen's comics are beautifully drawn have characters that feel realized and relatable even in such a short space of time and at the same time is story telling done right If the entire book was a collection of her comics I think this would've been a full star read for meI definitely enjoyed some of the essays a lot On the whole there's not much I didn't know before but it was still a lot of fun to read through this book Rather than being groundbreaking new information it felt like I was able to share something with someone else who's also had an interest in the same thing Like listening to a friend give you a different perspective on something you're already pretty well versed in I did really like seeing the contrasts between North AmericanWestern Lolitas to Japan and the talk of lolita vs otome for example in the essay Wavering bodies and Fluttering Minds as well as in general the talk around the function of lolita in people's lives Jane Mai's essay good at looking good I also personally really related to In general just a lot of fun to read and would especially recommend to people interested in the fashion or for An Nguyen's comics for anyone that likes comics with girls figuring out their identity friendship and girl power and lots of cute clothes

  4. Alenka Alenka says:

    I think I'm gonna get super on goodreads for a sec here Don't judge meI loved this book I'm a huge fan of Jane Mai's work but I've never read anything by An Nguyen before and now I'd really like to read because her research into Lolita culture was so wonderfully done accessible and enlightening The pair had a zine that teased the book that I got about a year ago so I had a very rough idea of what I was in for that this was going to be something empowering about women dressing for themselves but I was actually totally unprepared Nguyen often discusses how Lolitas Otomes and others view their style as genderless and dives deeply into the nuance of this clothing how it sometimes builds community sometimes is simply a way to find happiness sometimes unexpectedly allows wearers to express a kind of rottenness like a sweet beautiful cake left out a bit too long I am in a place where after a long struggle with clothing as it is connected to masculinity and femininity I am trying to decouple clothing from gender a concept stolen from Elizabeth Sweet's research on toys in order to feel comfortable when I walk through the world As a person who really isn't femme at all it felt so good so fascinating but even pivotal to read something like this Also the comics are really good often dark and communicate things about Lolita so brilliantly that can't uite be expressed in words Lolita after all is a visual thing just like comics

  5. Jaina Bee Jaina Bee says:

    I entered the book with curiosity about a subculture i really have nothing to do with and did not understand and exited the book floored wowed awed inspired and filled with so much respect for this movement and the statement Lolitas are making I had no idea how shunned and rejected Lolitas could be and what a statement of personal sovereignty Lolitas are making And the fact it has nothing at ALL to do with Nabokov or his famous character thank goodness The tricky issues of consumerism and aging and the sad reality of fashion history being so poorly archived all get airtime in this amazing collection

  6. Misty Misty says:

    This is a really fascinating look at Japanese lolita fashion cultureI wasn't very familiar with lolita before reading this Lolita is a frilly extremely labour intensive style inspired by European women's fashion of the 18th and 19th centuries It's presented as a self focused style whose goal is to empower the wearer which is sharply distinguished from styles which are meant to appeal to men or to society at large The essays in this collection draw from historical research and with lolita practitioners in Japan and the west in order to shed a light on the history of the style and what it means to its wearers An Nguyen one of the two authors comes from a sociological background and her analysis is well written and fascinatingThe essays are interspersed with artwork and comics which bring a personal perspective to the topic Jane Mai and An Nguyen's comics are a mixture of semi fictionalized personal stories fictional stories from the perspectives of western lolitas and fictionalized depictions of the lives of some of the Japanese lolitas who were interviewed for this project It's an unusual approach for this kind of book but it works extremely well There is also a lolita lookbook at the beginning of the book which does a good job of providing a visual overview of lolita styles for readers who are unfamiliarI definitely recommend this book to anyone who's interested in learning about this style and what it means to those who wear it

  7. Ksenia Ksenia says:

    thinking back about it i had a lot of hangups relating to women what it means to be a woman and what it means to present yourself as a woman this isn't to say i was very thorough in my reflection as a teen i was a shitlord as most teens are wont to be and frustrated and angry all the time without really knowing really exactly why Jane Mai in the essay 'Good at Looking Good' This book rules its the perfect mix of personal reflection and cultural criticism There's so much here for people curious about lolita fashion at all levels of experience There is enough explanation for un indoctrinated and enough niche for the fully immersed The essay and interview with Novala Takemoto were particular highlights And this is all before even talking about the comics

  8. grace grace says:

    Very informative much better than blurbs in books about wacky Japanese things As someone who knows a lot about lolita I still learned things and either way it's very interesting The comics were beautiful and touching LUV IT

  9. Tesni Rhys Tesni Rhys says:

    Resilience smashing the patriarchy via going against mainstream beauty standards dressing for yourself sisterhood community nonconformity to gender roles kindness towards yourself and others These are some topics I picked up from reading this graphic novel I really enjoyed it

  10. Derek Royal Derek Royal says:

    The comics are nice but the essays both Nguyen's and Mai's are what give this hybrid collection its impact Thoughtful and clarifying

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