Necronomicon: The Best Weird Fiction PDF/EPUB ☆ Best

Necronomicon: The Best Weird Fiction PDF/EPUB ☆ Best

Necronomicon: The Best Weird Fiction ❰EPUB❯ ✼ Necronomicon: The Best Weird Fiction Author H.P. Lovecraft – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk fr Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Not Retrouvez Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Lovecraft et des millions de livres en stock sur fr Achetez neuf ou d'occasion fr Necronomicon The Be fr Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of Best Weird PDF/EPUB ç H P Not Retrouvez Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Lovecraft et des millions de livres Necronomicon: The PDF or en stock sur fr Achetez neuf ou d'occasion fr Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Not Retrouvez Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft The Best Weird PDF º et des millions de livres en stock sur fr Achetez neuf ou d'occasion Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales by HP Necronomicon the Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft was my first taste of true classic horror—I mean I’ve read Poe Irving Shelley etc but for some reason I don’t think about classic horror when I think of those author’s stories Lovecraft is the epitome of classic horror in my book I haven’t read any of Algernon Blackwood’s spooky tales but from what I just read no one can beat Lovecraft Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft Les meilleures offres pour Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft Commemorative Edition NOU sont sur eBay Comparez les prix et les spcificits des produits neufs et d'occasion Pleins d'articles en livraison gratuite Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Lovecraft By HP Lovecraft edited with an Afterword by Stephen Jones and illustrated by Les Edwards London Gollancz; ; ISBN hardcover or paperback; pages Purchasing This Book Necronomicon The Best Tales of H P Lovecraft Necronomicon The Best Tales of H P Lovecraft Paperback – August by H P Lovecraft Author out of stars ratings See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions Price New from Used from Paperback Please retry — Paperback New from Stories included in this volume Night Gaunts Dagon The Statement of Randolph Carter Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft Audiobook Part Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft is perhaps best known as the inventor of the world's most famous non existent book The Necronomicon a magical grimoire supposed to be the work of 'the mad Arab' al Hazred Despite not existing the Necronomicon became highly sought after and widely believed in by occultists and other such gullible folk Not surprising then that the publishers chose it as the title for this collection of Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft Commemorative Edition H P Lovecraft Stephen Jones Les Edwards on com FREE shipping on ualifying offers Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft Commemorative Edition fr Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Not Retrouvez Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Lovecraft et des millions de livres en stock sur fr Achetez neuf ou d'occasion fr Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Not Retrouvez Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft et des millions de livres en stock sur fr Achetez neuf ou d'occasion Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales by HP Necronomicon the Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft was my first taste of true classic horror—I mean I’ve read Poe Irving Shelley etc but for some reason I don’t think about classic horror when I think of those author’s stories Lovecraft is the epitome of classic horror in my book I haven’t read any of Algernon Blackwood’s spooky tales but from what I just read no one can beat Lovecraft Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft Les meilleures offres pour Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft Commemorative Edition NOU sont sur eBay Comparez les prix et les spcificits des produits neufs et d'occasion Pleins d'articles en livraison gratuite Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of H P Lovecraft By HP Lovecraft edited with an Afterword by Stephen Jones and illustrated by Les Edwards London Gollancz; ; ISBN hardcover or paperback; pages Purchasing This Book Necronomicon The Best Tales of H P Lovecraft Necronomicon The Best Tales of H P Lovecraft Paperback – August by H P Lovecraft Author out of stars ratings See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions Price New from Used from Paperback Please retry — Paperback New from Stories included in this volume Night Gaunts Dagon The Statement of Randolph Carter Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft Audiobook Part Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft is perhaps best known as the inventor of the world's most famous non existent book The Necronomicon a magical grimoire supposed to be the work of 'the mad Arab' al Hazred Despite not existing the Necronomicon became highly sought after and widely believed in by occultists and other such gullible folk Not surprising then that the publishers chose it as the title for this collection of Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft Commemorative Edition H P Lovecraft Stephen Jones Les Edwards on com FREE shipping on ualifying offers Necronomicon The Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft Commemorative Edition.


10 thoughts on “Necronomicon: The Best Weird Fiction

  1. Peter Peter says:

    This is the history of one of the most notorious fictive books ever I especially liked the reference to the Pickman family you can read Lovecraft's story Pickman's Model and the interesting rumours on Abdul Alhazred's death Very creepy very informative and with absolutely cult status You have to check your local library for an edition Absolutely recommended for every traveler in the Lovecraft universe


  2. Olivier Delaye Olivier Delaye says:

    All right with this one under my belt I think I can safely say that I’ve read everything Lovecraft has ever written in his life I will then skip introducing the author––who doesn’t need any introduction anyway––and go through a rundown of some of my most beloved horror stories of his which you can find in this collectionTHE OUTSIDER is my favorite Lovecraft story bar none It is also one of his shortest Written in the first person narrative as is often the case in his fiction it tells of a man or is it? who after having lived as a recluse for what seems like a very long time in his darkened and lifeless castle or is it? decides one day to go out into the world and explore There ensues a series of discoveries––with a devastating although somewhat anticipated reveal––which will seal the narrator’s fate forever As said this story is super short but masterfully executed woven around the themes of loneliness abnormality and the afterlife The prose is as it should given the genre––divinely gothic deliciously verbose and darkly purple All in all a masterpieceTHE DREAMS IN THE WITCH HOUSE is my second favorite and the only one that actually gave me goosebumps while reading it for the first time in bed at night This story of a math student who decides to rent a room in a cursed house in which a witch and her hellish amalgam of a familiar are said to have lived is downright disturbing and creepy and just too well written for comfort Which makes it yet another masterpiece in the Lovecraft canonTHE HAUNTER OF THE DARK is my third most beloved Lovecraft story and also the last one he ever wrote that we know of Eschewing the first person for the third limited Lovecraft treats us to a chilling account of what the protagonist Robert Blake discovers when driven by his penchant for the occult he decides to go and explore a haunted church in the town of Providence RI Here again the writing is on point as Lovecraft knows better than anyone how to create an atmosphere of claustrophobia and paranoia playing unashamedly with the fear of the unknown and impending doom Deeply steeped in the Cthulhu mythos this story is a prime example of how curiosity can kill a catTHE CALL OF CTHULHU Although not the first Lovecraft story to introduce an element of the Cthulhu mythos that would be Dagon also included in this collection this one is the first to feature the foul smelling tentacle wielding and potbellied deity in all its greasy and nasty glory Written as an epistolary short story it gives an account of the discovery of Cthulhu via a series of documents left behind by the great uncle of the narrator Francis Wayland Thurston Three words groundbreaking masterful perfect THE RATS IN THE WALLS is another gothic masterpiece recounting the tale of Delapore an American who decides to cross the pond and move to England into his ancestral manor the ill fated Exham Priory After restoring it Delapore soon discovers that something isn’t uite right about the place and prompted by scurrying noises in the walls decides to investigate Lovecraft juggles many balls in this one––the haunted house genetic mutations cannibalism forbidden worships and eldritch doesn’t Lovecraft just love this word? cults the inescapability of heredity mental disorder etc––providing us with nail biting scenes of exploration and horror and tying it all together albeit loosely into his infamous Cthulhu mythos Definitely a winnerTHE SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH is yet another effective horror story set waist deep in the Cthulhu mythos and from what I’ve heard a favorite of many Lovecraft aficionados Told once again in the first person the story is about a student whose name is never revealed who goes to the ruined seaside town of Innsmouth Mass for what he thinks will be a one day trip Lovecraft spares no words in describing the cursed town and we soon understand that the nature of the curse boils down to an invasion of Innsmouth many years ago by the Deep Ones an ancient people that came ashore from the bottom of the sea From the town drunk with whom the narrator has a long perhaps overlong? conversation we learn that the Deep Ones used to practice human sacrifices in Innsmouth and also did not hesitate to mate with local women hence the fishy appearance of many of the inhabitants The whole thing ends up with a big reveal which for once isn’t as bad as one might expect for a Lovecraft story and the author even gives us a long very well written action scene toward the end which is something rare enough to be mentioned and relishedI guess I could go on like this forever as there are many other stories in this collection that are worth reading and rereading but I will stop here for now It’s late and I think I heard something scurrying in the walls Wonder what it isOLIVIER DELAYEAuthor of the SEBASTEN OF ATLANTIS seriesThe Forgotten Goddess


  3. David David says:

    Lovecraft has to be broken down into his constituent parts in order to be comprehensible 1 Man2 Mythographer 3 Writer The man by far is easily the most reprehensible and unforgivable This may take a little explanation for those unfamiliar with the man and the writer Firstly HPL believed in a crude Social DarwinismEugenics married to a virulent racismxenophobia and a despicable classism When reading Necronomicon or any of his works all of these elements become impossible to ignore and are virtually shouted from the pagesscreens It is popular to dismiss these beliefs as being a part of the society he was raised in Of course he was raised in a racist classist xenophobic time as well as a time when Social Darwinism and especially eugenics were very popularamongst intellectuals Still other writers came out of such belief systems and their work was not penetrated by hate in the manner that HPL's work is There is something almost infantile about this which raises the specter of a facile Freudian reading of the man's character The latter would not be very useful because it is culturally limited and scientifically invalid It is enough to say that hate drives much of HPL's work and it makes this of limited value The writer is another level that needs to be looked at because it suggests the same infantile and superficial understanding of the world as well Firstly there is very limited character development; the attitude of HPL to women is at best ambivalent; exposition is shaky and HPL had a tin ear for dialogue The prose is almost exclusively purple even for his creaky gothic constructions No writer or reader will find anything at this level to learn from HPL The only element of HPL's writing worth the reader's attention is that he may be the first HorrorScience Fantasy writer to leave the big bad alive and well and man's position relative to this as tenuous The last element of HPL that should be looked at is his myth Here is the one place where HPL shines His creation of an ante diluvian world of races not human on earth and others that came from off of earth is fascinating and worthy of study Given the amount of fiction and 'fan fiction' which his 'Cthulian' mythos has generated HPL remains a significant presence in the world of genre fiction and yes there is a difference between genre and literature For this reason and this reason alone HPL remains a writer worth revisiting However the reader needs to be prepared for the moral vacuity and hate which they will encounter in the work of HPL Not to mention the horrific writing which is often responsible for some of the worst published writing I have ever come across Rating 3 out of 5 stars Not recommended for morally sensitive readersor aesthetically inclined ones either


  4. Andrew Fantasia Andrew Fantasia says:

    I suppose the two best words to describe my feelings on the work of the 20th century's most prolific horror writer are mostly disappointingTHE GOODI wasn't disappointed with everything A bunch of stories stood out for me as being genuine page turning excitement The Colour Out of Space The Dunwich Horror The Whisperer in Darkness Dreams in the Witch House The Shadow Over Innsmouth and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward were all outstanding pieces of spookery that still managed to give me chills nearly 100 years after the time of writing and that is one heck of an accomplishmentTHE BADMaybe it's the generation gap but I find it very hard to get accustomed to stories written with little or no dialogue Wave after wave of endless paragraphs broken only ever so slightly by the odd letter or telegram is a tedious way to tell a story This book contains 34 short stories and by the end of the 4th one I was begging for some actual character work and dialogue rather than And then I went here and then this happened and by the way here are some lovely descriptions of New England architecture for no particular reason Every one of these stories ESPECIALLY Dream uest of Unknown Kadath is less a work of prose and of a steady ramble intermittently made all the jarring when Lovecraft tosses in unwieldy words like Shub Niggurath or Ia Azathoth Ia Ia Yargoth Leng Zok because phrases like that add so much to the storyThe horror itself works occasionally and when it does it's friggin awesome But 80% of the time it's a melodramatic mess I totally understand the Jaws method of horror wherein the less you see of the monster the effective it is But in Lovecraft's case not only do we barely ever glimpse his infamous creatures but whenever we DO catch a fleeting glimpse our protagonists who are narrating these encounters faint Every Single Time Did people in the 1920s justFAINT a lot? Was fainting a nation wide epidemic back then like polio or selfies? People in these stories faint at the drop of a fucking hat I saw a rat Faint I heard a scary noise Faint I think there might be a piece of carrot stuck between my teeth Faint As for the monsters themselves like I said they're barely BARELY present Lovecraft's imagination is strong enough to dream up so many fantastic terrors yet he seems keen on keeping them to himself Even his protagonists are stingy with details; their accounts of the horrors they witnessed are usually along the lines of And then I saw something that was so frightening that I can't even describe how frightening it was because its frightening uotient was utterly indescribable but trust me it was really frightening so you should totally faint nowLovecraft is also wont to repeat himself A LOT Yes Howard I know Arkham has gambrel roofs I know Nyarlathotep is a crawling chaos and I know Abdul Al Hazred was known to be a Mad Arab I know this because after the first several hundred times you brought it up it happened to stick In At The Mountains of Madness if I'd had a dollar for every time Lovecraft used the words decadent anddemoniac I could have purchased a very big yacht or a very small countryConsidering that these stories are supposed to make up The Cthulu Mythos I was a little miffed to say the least when I turned the final page and realized that I could only recall Cthulu's name popping up twice TWICE in 850 pages And even then it was probably in some context like And I thought I saw Cthulu but then I faintedI guess I was just hoping for something grander Maybe Arkham Horror spoiled me but I bought this book expecting an intricate tapestry of characters scattered throughout the same town slowly unravelling the ancient mysteries of some hitherto unknown supernatural force encroaching upon them from beyond time space finally uniting in some epic conclusion that would pit man against monster Kinda like the Marvel Cinematic Universe except instead of robots superheroes it would be cosmic octopus monsters hard boiled 1920s detectives embarking on their own uniue individual adventures before coming together Avengers style for the final curtain Unfortunately neither the monsters nor the humans receive much characterization As mentioned the monsters exist not on the page but solely in Lovecraft's mind and the humans are usually dull interchangeable A few of these heroes seemed like they were ABOUT to get interesting but then a cool breeze blew through their windows naturally causing them to faintThe cover of this book states that these are the best weird tales of HP Lovecraft Here's hoping I never have to read the worst


  5. Tara Tara says:

    “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear” HP Lovecraft This collection of weird fiction short stories and novellas is slightly inconsistent in terms of uality but it contains so many genuinely original and thoroughly harrowing sinister tales that on the whole I found it a highly enjoyable—and often exuisitely eerie—reading experience That said I’d really only recommend it for hardcore fans of Lovecraft; for everyone else there are far better—by which I really mean far shorter—ways to get acuainted with him At nearly 900 pages this volume is better suited to those who’ve already explored his famous stories although you’ll find all of his most popular works here too and they are incredibly fun to revisit If you’re also interested in delving deeper into his oeuvre in dwelling amongst “all the snarling chaos and grinning fear that lurk behind life” you will find much to savor here Lovecraft was a very dark very strange little monkeyList of StoriesNight GauntsDagonThe Statement of Randolph CarterThe Doom The Came to SarnathThe Cats of Ulthar The Nameless CityHerbert West ReanimatorThe Music of Erich ZannThe Lurking FearThe HoundThe Rats in the WallsUnder the PyramidsThe UnnamableIn the VaultThe OutsiderThe Horror at Red HookThe Colour Out of SpacePickman’s ModelThe Call of CthulhuCool Air The Shunned HouseThe Silver KeyThe Dunwich HorrorThe Whisperer in DarknessThe Strange High House in the MistThe Dreams in the Witch HouseFrom BeyondThrough the Gates of the Silver KeyAt the Mountains of MadnessThe Shadow Over InnsmouthThe Shadow Out of TimeThe Haunter of the DarkThe Thing on the DoorstepThe Case of Charles Dexter WardThe Dream uest of Unknown KadathTo a DreamerAfterword A Gentleman of Providence by Stephen Jones personal favorite


  6. Emily Emily says:

    It seriously took a publisher how much of a century to title a collection of Lovecraft's stories Necronomicon? Like seventy years? Did it really just not occur to anyone? Shouldn't the first collected volume of his stories have been called that? I blame August DerlethSpeaking of whom I don't believe this edition features the re edited versions of the texts available in the Library of America edition of Lovecraft Necronomicon includes the older editions as published by Derleth's Arkham House featuring Derleth's let's call them bold typographical choices including italicizing the second half of the final sentence in many stories to heighten tension and irritate meOh also There's a rather nice map of Arkham Massachusetts printed on the front and back endpapers Admittedly it's very similar to the map accompanying the Arkham entry in The Dictionary of Imaginary Places but never mind that Endpaper maps Whooooo At least it's rather better than Necronomicon's other illustrations which are for some reason the same three pictures of a shifty lookin' guy a pile of old books and papers and a megalith repeated fairly randomly at the first and last pages of many stories Why not? Also it's bound really poorly basically a paperbound book with hard boards but this is true of virtually all hardcover editions published these days which is lamentable but hardly uniue to this bookI sound like I'm being pretty hard on Necronomicon but I was totally pleased with it I like having a single volume hardcover edition of most of Lovecraft's stories with the single most appropriate title possible Not all stories are included notable omissions include Nyarlathotep and Beyond the Wall of Sleep but it includes most important works such as The Call of Cthulhu At the Mountains of Madness The Whisperer in Darkness The Dream uest of Unknown Kadath and so on That's really all I ask of a NecronomiconAlso the italics are kinda like eldritch alien text yeah? SureEdit Ok looking back there are than just those three repeating illustrationsThere are also pictures of some houses


  7. Mike (the Paladin) Mike (the Paladin) says:

    You know I picked this up because I'd been told it gathered the Cthulhu mythos stories Actually we start off with some of his early horror work Cool Air The rats in the Walls etc Later on we do get into the Cthulhu stories These are as always with Lovecraft reliably horrific and very well writtenEnjoy


  8. Alexis Alexis says:

    New life goalto write a cult book about another book that doesn't exist


  9. David David says:

    The five star rating for this book is not because I think every story or even most of them were 5 stars or because Lovecraft was a great writer though I do think he was a better writer than he's often given credit for It's because these stories are essential reading Like him or hate him Lovecraft casts a long dark shadow over all of American fantasy and horror and in fact the stories are mostly pretty good in a very dated way Yes Lovecraft wrote purple Yes his characterization is usually pretty thin And yes he was a horrible racist and it shows in his writing But no one who touched this genre after him has been untouched by it and if you have ever been awed or frightened or scared by a tale of eldritch horrors unfathomable beings from beyond time and space bubbling suamous obscenities so horrible that the very sight of them will erode your sanity or vast alien cosmic gods inimical to humans and regarding us the way we regard germs well that's all Lovecraftian influenceYou also have Lovecraft to thank for a raft of awesome boardgames and RPGs from the classic Call of Cthulhu to Eldritch Horror and Cthulhu WarsWhile Lovecraft's stories are typically labeled fantasy hence his likeness being the trophy for the World Fantasy Award he was really a science fiction writer or perhaps science fantasy His Elder Gods and the inhuman things that served them were not gods in the sense of being truly divine but rather vast cosmic powers who exist on a scale beyond human comprehension The magic sometimes found in his stories even spells read from books like the Necronomicon are likewise means of bending reality in ways Man Was Not Meant to Know but ultimately his creatures are aliens not demons and his supernatural horror stems from science perverted beyond recognition not from arcane witchcraft Whenever something in the way of a traditional monster appears in a Lovecraft story like a mere ghost or vampire or werewolf it's probably something much much worseThis collection contains most of Lovecraft's better known stories focusing largely on his Cthulhu mythos cycle so there is lots of suamous horror here All the familiar names are here Cthulhu Hastur Shub Niggurath Nyarlathotep Yog Sothoth Dagon etc Monsters of all shapes and sizes and degenerate inbred New England townsfolk who usually have nasty things in their barns wells attics and woodsIf you want a Lovecraft primer this is a good start I'd read all these stories before but many of them I had not read for years so I enjoyed going through the classics again even if they don't bring me uite the same feeling of existential horror they did when I was a teenagerHere is the complete list of stories in this audiobookDagonHerbert West ReanimatorThe Lurking FearThe Rats in the WallsThe Whisperer in the DarknessCool AirIn the VaultThe Call of CthulhuThe Color Out of SpaceThe Horror at Red HookThe Music of Eric ZahnThe Shadow Out of TimeThe Dunwich HorrorThe Haunter of the DarkThe OutsiderThe Shunned HouseThe UnnameableThe Thing on the DoorstepUnder the PyramidsIt's a fine collection of creepy and fantasy stories and great inspiration before playing a game of Arkham Horror or Call of Cthulhu


  10. Patrick Patrick says:

    Necronomicon the Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft was my first taste of true classic horror—I mean I’ve read Poe Irving Shelley etc but for some reason I don’t think about classic horror when I think of those author’s stories Lovecraft is the epitome of classic horror in my book I haven’t read any of Algernon Blackwood’s spooky tales but from what I just read no one can beat Lovecraft I finished reading Jane Austen’s seven large novels not too long ago and I was astounded by her writing ability I think I just read someone who can not only rival her but top her Lovecraft’s writing prose is one of the best of the classic writers I’ve read this year The way he describes his monsters and establishes a creepy scene is definitely something worth studying if you’re a writer If you didn’t know the Necronomicon is a collection of his best works They aren’t all of his works There were a few stories that took a while before getting to the “good stuff” but most immediately drew you into the story My favorite is Herbert West—Reanimator Not only did it have a necromancy like feel to it like Frankenstein but Lovecraft went into how West began his studies in bringing the dead to life and it completely drew my interest It was not only creepy but cool as F%#K I also liked the Doom that Came to Sarnath The Colour out of Space and the Call of Cthulhu to name a few If you love spooky tales and haven’t read Lovecraft I totally recommend that you do You will not be disappointed I’ve enjoyed reading these tales this past month and I really looked forward to my lunch hour at work because I could read my next Lovecraft story I haven’t loved reading this much in a long time I also loved some of the audiobooks If I forgot my book at home I would listen to one on youtube The first youtube page I listened to was Horror Babble with readings by Ian Gordan What A Treat next youtube page I came across that was just as good if not better was Horror Readings by GM Danielson His introduction to each of the books is a bit much I don't like the modern demonic horror stuff but his readings are AMAZE Ballz I hope you enjoy these stories just as much as I did Don’t let the shadows bite


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “Necronomicon: The Best Weird Fiction

  1. Peter Peter says:

    This is the history of one of the most notorious fictive books ever I especially liked the reference to the Pickman family you can read Lovecraft's story Pickman's Model and the interesting rumours on Abdul Alhazred's death Very creepy very informative and with absolutely cult status You have to check your local library for an edition Absolutely recommended for every traveler in the Lovecraft universe

  2. Olivier Delaye Olivier Delaye says:

    All right with this one under my belt I think I can safely say that I’ve read everything Lovecraft has ever written in his life I will then skip introducing the author––who doesn’t need any introduction anyway––and go through a rundown of some of my most beloved horror stories of his which you can find in this collectionTHE OUTSIDER is my favorite Lovecraft story bar none It is also one of his shortest Written in the first person narrative as is often the case in his fiction it tells of a man or is it? who after having lived as a recluse for what seems like a very long time in his darkened and lifeless castle or is it? decides one day to go out into the world and explore There ensues a series of discoveries––with a devastating although somewhat anticipated reveal––which will seal the narrator’s fate forever As said this story is super short but masterfully executed woven around the themes of loneliness abnormality and the afterlife The prose is as it should given the genre––divinely gothic deliciously verbose and darkly purple All in all a masterpieceTHE DREAMS IN THE WITCH HOUSE is my second favorite and the only one that actually gave me goosebumps while reading it for the first time in bed at night This story of a math student who decides to rent a room in a cursed house in which a witch and her hellish amalgam of a familiar are said to have lived is downright disturbing and creepy and just too well written for comfort Which makes it yet another masterpiece in the Lovecraft canonTHE HAUNTER OF THE DARK is my third most beloved Lovecraft story and also the last one he ever wrote that we know of Eschewing the first person for the third limited Lovecraft treats us to a chilling account of what the protagonist Robert Blake discovers when driven by his penchant for the occult he decides to go and explore a haunted church in the town of Providence RI Here again the writing is on point as Lovecraft knows better than anyone how to create an atmosphere of claustrophobia and paranoia playing unashamedly with the fear of the unknown and impending doom Deeply steeped in the Cthulhu mythos this story is a prime example of how curiosity can kill a catTHE CALL OF CTHULHU Although not the first Lovecraft story to introduce an element of the Cthulhu mythos that would be Dagon also included in this collection this one is the first to feature the foul smelling tentacle wielding and potbellied deity in all its greasy and nasty glory Written as an epistolary short story it gives an account of the discovery of Cthulhu via a series of documents left behind by the great uncle of the narrator Francis Wayland Thurston Three words groundbreaking masterful perfect THE RATS IN THE WALLS is another gothic masterpiece recounting the tale of Delapore an American who decides to cross the pond and move to England into his ancestral manor the ill fated Exham Priory After restoring it Delapore soon discovers that something isn’t uite right about the place and prompted by scurrying noises in the walls decides to investigate Lovecraft juggles many balls in this one––the haunted house genetic mutations cannibalism forbidden worships and eldritch doesn’t Lovecraft just love this word? cults the inescapability of heredity mental disorder etc––providing us with nail biting scenes of exploration and horror and tying it all together albeit loosely into his infamous Cthulhu mythos Definitely a winnerTHE SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH is yet another effective horror story set waist deep in the Cthulhu mythos and from what I’ve heard a favorite of many Lovecraft aficionados Told once again in the first person the story is about a student whose name is never revealed who goes to the ruined seaside town of Innsmouth Mass for what he thinks will be a one day trip Lovecraft spares no words in describing the cursed town and we soon understand that the nature of the curse boils down to an invasion of Innsmouth many years ago by the Deep Ones an ancient people that came ashore from the bottom of the sea From the town drunk with whom the narrator has a long perhaps overlong? conversation we learn that the Deep Ones used to practice human sacrifices in Innsmouth and also did not hesitate to mate with local women hence the fishy appearance of many of the inhabitants The whole thing ends up with a big reveal which for once isn’t as bad as one might expect for a Lovecraft story and the author even gives us a long very well written action scene toward the end which is something rare enough to be mentioned and relishedI guess I could go on like this forever as there are many other stories in this collection that are worth reading and rereading but I will stop here for now It’s late and I think I heard something scurrying in the walls Wonder what it isOLIVIER DELAYEAuthor of the SEBASTEN OF ATLANTIS seriesThe Forgotten Goddess

  3. David David says:

    Lovecraft has to be broken down into his constituent parts in order to be comprehensible 1 Man2 Mythographer 3 Writer The man by far is easily the most reprehensible and unforgivable This may take a little explanation for those unfamiliar with the man and the writer Firstly HPL believed in a crude Social DarwinismEugenics married to a virulent racismxenophobia and a despicable classism When reading Necronomicon or any of his works all of these elements become impossible to ignore and are virtually shouted from the pagesscreens It is popular to dismiss these beliefs as being a part of the society he was raised in Of course he was raised in a racist classist xenophobic time as well as a time when Social Darwinism and especially eugenics were very popularamongst intellectuals Still other writers came out of such belief systems and their work was not penetrated by hate in the manner that HPL's work is There is something almost infantile about this which raises the specter of a facile Freudian reading of the man's character The latter would not be very useful because it is culturally limited and scientifically invalid It is enough to say that hate drives much of HPL's work and it makes this of limited value The writer is another level that needs to be looked at because it suggests the same infantile and superficial understanding of the world as well Firstly there is very limited character development; the attitude of HPL to women is at best ambivalent; exposition is shaky and HPL had a tin ear for dialogue The prose is almost exclusively purple even for his creaky gothic constructions No writer or reader will find anything at this level to learn from HPL The only element of HPL's writing worth the reader's attention is that he may be the first HorrorScience Fantasy writer to leave the big bad alive and well and man's position relative to this as tenuous The last element of HPL that should be looked at is his myth Here is the one place where HPL shines His creation of an ante diluvian world of races not human on earth and others that came from off of earth is fascinating and worthy of study Given the amount of fiction and 'fan fiction' which his 'Cthulian' mythos has generated HPL remains a significant presence in the world of genre fiction and yes there is a difference between genre and literature For this reason and this reason alone HPL remains a writer worth revisiting However the reader needs to be prepared for the moral vacuity and hate which they will encounter in the work of HPL Not to mention the horrific writing which is often responsible for some of the worst published writing I have ever come across Rating 3 out of 5 stars Not recommended for morally sensitive readersor aesthetically inclined ones either

  4. Andrew Fantasia Andrew Fantasia says:

    I suppose the two best words to describe my feelings on the work of the 20th century's most prolific horror writer are mostly disappointingTHE GOODI wasn't disappointed with everything A bunch of stories stood out for me as being genuine page turning excitement The Colour Out of Space The Dunwich Horror The Whisperer in Darkness Dreams in the Witch House The Shadow Over Innsmouth and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward were all outstanding pieces of spookery that still managed to give me chills nearly 100 years after the time of writing and that is one heck of an accomplishmentTHE BADMaybe it's the generation gap but I find it very hard to get accustomed to stories written with little or no dialogue Wave after wave of endless paragraphs broken only ever so slightly by the odd letter or telegram is a tedious way to tell a story This book contains 34 short stories and by the end of the 4th one I was begging for some actual character work and dialogue rather than And then I went here and then this happened and by the way here are some lovely descriptions of New England architecture for no particular reason Every one of these stories ESPECIALLY Dream uest of Unknown Kadath is less a work of prose and of a steady ramble intermittently made all the jarring when Lovecraft tosses in unwieldy words like Shub Niggurath or Ia Azathoth Ia Ia Yargoth Leng Zok because phrases like that add so much to the storyThe horror itself works occasionally and when it does it's friggin awesome But 80% of the time it's a melodramatic mess I totally understand the Jaws method of horror wherein the less you see of the monster the effective it is But in Lovecraft's case not only do we barely ever glimpse his infamous creatures but whenever we DO catch a fleeting glimpse our protagonists who are narrating these encounters faint Every Single Time Did people in the 1920s justFAINT a lot? Was fainting a nation wide epidemic back then like polio or selfies? People in these stories faint at the drop of a fucking hat I saw a rat Faint I heard a scary noise Faint I think there might be a piece of carrot stuck between my teeth Faint As for the monsters themselves like I said they're barely BARELY present Lovecraft's imagination is strong enough to dream up so many fantastic terrors yet he seems keen on keeping them to himself Even his protagonists are stingy with details; their accounts of the horrors they witnessed are usually along the lines of And then I saw something that was so frightening that I can't even describe how frightening it was because its frightening uotient was utterly indescribable but trust me it was really frightening so you should totally faint nowLovecraft is also wont to repeat himself A LOT Yes Howard I know Arkham has gambrel roofs I know Nyarlathotep is a crawling chaos and I know Abdul Al Hazred was known to be a Mad Arab I know this because after the first several hundred times you brought it up it happened to stick In At The Mountains of Madness if I'd had a dollar for every time Lovecraft used the words decadent anddemoniac I could have purchased a very big yacht or a very small countryConsidering that these stories are supposed to make up The Cthulu Mythos I was a little miffed to say the least when I turned the final page and realized that I could only recall Cthulu's name popping up twice TWICE in 850 pages And even then it was probably in some context like And I thought I saw Cthulu but then I faintedI guess I was just hoping for something grander Maybe Arkham Horror spoiled me but I bought this book expecting an intricate tapestry of characters scattered throughout the same town slowly unravelling the ancient mysteries of some hitherto unknown supernatural force encroaching upon them from beyond time space finally uniting in some epic conclusion that would pit man against monster Kinda like the Marvel Cinematic Universe except instead of robots superheroes it would be cosmic octopus monsters hard boiled 1920s detectives embarking on their own uniue individual adventures before coming together Avengers style for the final curtain Unfortunately neither the monsters nor the humans receive much characterization As mentioned the monsters exist not on the page but solely in Lovecraft's mind and the humans are usually dull interchangeable A few of these heroes seemed like they were ABOUT to get interesting but then a cool breeze blew through their windows naturally causing them to faintThe cover of this book states that these are the best weird tales of HP Lovecraft Here's hoping I never have to read the worst

  5. Tara Tara says:

    “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear” HP Lovecraft This collection of weird fiction short stories and novellas is slightly inconsistent in terms of uality but it contains so many genuinely original and thoroughly harrowing sinister tales that on the whole I found it a highly enjoyable—and often exuisitely eerie—reading experience That said I’d really only recommend it for hardcore fans of Lovecraft; for everyone else there are far better—by which I really mean far shorter—ways to get acuainted with him At nearly 900 pages this volume is better suited to those who’ve already explored his famous stories although you’ll find all of his most popular works here too and they are incredibly fun to revisit If you’re also interested in delving deeper into his oeuvre in dwelling amongst “all the snarling chaos and grinning fear that lurk behind life” you will find much to savor here Lovecraft was a very dark very strange little monkeyList of StoriesNight GauntsDagonThe Statement of Randolph CarterThe Doom The Came to SarnathThe Cats of Ulthar The Nameless CityHerbert West ReanimatorThe Music of Erich ZannThe Lurking FearThe HoundThe Rats in the WallsUnder the PyramidsThe UnnamableIn the VaultThe OutsiderThe Horror at Red HookThe Colour Out of SpacePickman’s ModelThe Call of CthulhuCool Air The Shunned HouseThe Silver KeyThe Dunwich HorrorThe Whisperer in DarknessThe Strange High House in the MistThe Dreams in the Witch HouseFrom BeyondThrough the Gates of the Silver KeyAt the Mountains of MadnessThe Shadow Over InnsmouthThe Shadow Out of TimeThe Haunter of the DarkThe Thing on the DoorstepThe Case of Charles Dexter WardThe Dream uest of Unknown KadathTo a DreamerAfterword A Gentleman of Providence by Stephen Jones personal favorite

  6. Emily Emily says:

    It seriously took a publisher how much of a century to title a collection of Lovecraft's stories Necronomicon? Like seventy years? Did it really just not occur to anyone? Shouldn't the first collected volume of his stories have been called that? I blame August DerlethSpeaking of whom I don't believe this edition features the re edited versions of the texts available in the Library of America edition of Lovecraft Necronomicon includes the older editions as published by Derleth's Arkham House featuring Derleth's let's call them bold typographical choices including italicizing the second half of the final sentence in many stories to heighten tension and irritate meOh also There's a rather nice map of Arkham Massachusetts printed on the front and back endpapers Admittedly it's very similar to the map accompanying the Arkham entry in The Dictionary of Imaginary Places but never mind that Endpaper maps Whooooo At least it's rather better than Necronomicon's other illustrations which are for some reason the same three pictures of a shifty lookin' guy a pile of old books and papers and a megalith repeated fairly randomly at the first and last pages of many stories Why not? Also it's bound really poorly basically a paperbound book with hard boards but this is true of virtually all hardcover editions published these days which is lamentable but hardly uniue to this bookI sound like I'm being pretty hard on Necronomicon but I was totally pleased with it I like having a single volume hardcover edition of most of Lovecraft's stories with the single most appropriate title possible Not all stories are included notable omissions include Nyarlathotep and Beyond the Wall of Sleep but it includes most important works such as The Call of Cthulhu At the Mountains of Madness The Whisperer in Darkness The Dream uest of Unknown Kadath and so on That's really all I ask of a NecronomiconAlso the italics are kinda like eldritch alien text yeah? SureEdit Ok looking back there are than just those three repeating illustrationsThere are also pictures of some houses

  7. Mike (the Paladin) Mike (the Paladin) says:

    You know I picked this up because I'd been told it gathered the Cthulhu mythos stories Actually we start off with some of his early horror work Cool Air The rats in the Walls etc Later on we do get into the Cthulhu stories These are as always with Lovecraft reliably horrific and very well writtenEnjoy

  8. Alexis Alexis says:

    New life goalto write a cult book about another book that doesn't exist

  9. David David says:

    The five star rating for this book is not because I think every story or even most of them were 5 stars or because Lovecraft was a great writer though I do think he was a better writer than he's often given credit for It's because these stories are essential reading Like him or hate him Lovecraft casts a long dark shadow over all of American fantasy and horror and in fact the stories are mostly pretty good in a very dated way Yes Lovecraft wrote purple Yes his characterization is usually pretty thin And yes he was a horrible racist and it shows in his writing But no one who touched this genre after him has been untouched by it and if you have ever been awed or frightened or scared by a tale of eldritch horrors unfathomable beings from beyond time and space bubbling suamous obscenities so horrible that the very sight of them will erode your sanity or vast alien cosmic gods inimical to humans and regarding us the way we regard germs well that's all Lovecraftian influenceYou also have Lovecraft to thank for a raft of awesome boardgames and RPGs from the classic Call of Cthulhu to Eldritch Horror and Cthulhu WarsWhile Lovecraft's stories are typically labeled fantasy hence his likeness being the trophy for the World Fantasy Award he was really a science fiction writer or perhaps science fantasy His Elder Gods and the inhuman things that served them were not gods in the sense of being truly divine but rather vast cosmic powers who exist on a scale beyond human comprehension The magic sometimes found in his stories even spells read from books like the Necronomicon are likewise means of bending reality in ways Man Was Not Meant to Know but ultimately his creatures are aliens not demons and his supernatural horror stems from science perverted beyond recognition not from arcane witchcraft Whenever something in the way of a traditional monster appears in a Lovecraft story like a mere ghost or vampire or werewolf it's probably something much much worseThis collection contains most of Lovecraft's better known stories focusing largely on his Cthulhu mythos cycle so there is lots of suamous horror here All the familiar names are here Cthulhu Hastur Shub Niggurath Nyarlathotep Yog Sothoth Dagon etc Monsters of all shapes and sizes and degenerate inbred New England townsfolk who usually have nasty things in their barns wells attics and woodsIf you want a Lovecraft primer this is a good start I'd read all these stories before but many of them I had not read for years so I enjoyed going through the classics again even if they don't bring me uite the same feeling of existential horror they did when I was a teenagerHere is the complete list of stories in this audiobookDagonHerbert West ReanimatorThe Lurking FearThe Rats in the WallsThe Whisperer in the DarknessCool AirIn the VaultThe Call of CthulhuThe Color Out of SpaceThe Horror at Red HookThe Music of Eric ZahnThe Shadow Out of TimeThe Dunwich HorrorThe Haunter of the DarkThe OutsiderThe Shunned HouseThe UnnameableThe Thing on the DoorstepUnder the PyramidsIt's a fine collection of creepy and fantasy stories and great inspiration before playing a game of Arkham Horror or Call of Cthulhu

  10. Patrick Patrick says:

    Necronomicon the Best Weird Tales of HP Lovecraft was my first taste of true classic horror—I mean I’ve read Poe Irving Shelley etc but for some reason I don’t think about classic horror when I think of those author’s stories Lovecraft is the epitome of classic horror in my book I haven’t read any of Algernon Blackwood’s spooky tales but from what I just read no one can beat Lovecraft I finished reading Jane Austen’s seven large novels not too long ago and I was astounded by her writing ability I think I just read someone who can not only rival her but top her Lovecraft’s writing prose is one of the best of the classic writers I’ve read this year The way he describes his monsters and establishes a creepy scene is definitely something worth studying if you’re a writer If you didn’t know the Necronomicon is a collection of his best works They aren’t all of his works There were a few stories that took a while before getting to the “good stuff” but most immediately drew you into the story My favorite is Herbert West—Reanimator Not only did it have a necromancy like feel to it like Frankenstein but Lovecraft went into how West began his studies in bringing the dead to life and it completely drew my interest It was not only creepy but cool as F%#K I also liked the Doom that Came to Sarnath The Colour out of Space and the Call of Cthulhu to name a few If you love spooky tales and haven’t read Lovecraft I totally recommend that you do You will not be disappointed I’ve enjoyed reading these tales this past month and I really looked forward to my lunch hour at work because I could read my next Lovecraft story I haven’t loved reading this much in a long time I also loved some of the audiobooks If I forgot my book at home I would listen to one on youtube The first youtube page I listened to was Horror Babble with readings by Ian Gordan What A Treat next youtube page I came across that was just as good if not better was Horror Readings by GM Danielson His introduction to each of the books is a bit much I don't like the modern demonic horror stuff but his readings are AMAZE Ballz I hope you enjoy these stories just as much as I did Don’t let the shadows bite

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *