Der Tod in VenedigMario und der Zauberer Epub ✓ in

Der Tod in VenedigMario und der Zauberer Epub ✓ in


Der Tod in VenedigMario und der Zauberer ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☆ Der Tod in VenedigMario und der Zauberer ✪ Author Thomas Mann – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Thomas Manns Erzählungen sind vor allem eines großartige und abgründige Liebesgeschichten Der alternde Gustav Aschenbach zum Beispiel den es nach Venedig treibt verliebt sich an der schwülen Lagun Thomas Manns Erzählungen sind in VenedigMario MOBI î vor allem eines großartige und abgründige Liebesgeschichten Der alternde Gustav Aschenbach zum Beispiel den es nach Venedig treibt verliebt sich an der schwülen Lagune hoffnungslos in den jungen Tadzio und bringt es auch dann nicht über Der Tod ePUB ´ sich die Stadt zu verlassen als die Cholera ausbricht Der Tod in VenedigTristanDie vertauschten KöpfeGladius DeiSchwere StundeDas Gesetz.

  • Paperback
  • 383 pages
  • Der Tod in VenedigMario und der Zauberer
  • Thomas Mann
  • German
  • 20 July 2016
  • 9783596900275

About the Author: Thomas Mann

See this thread for in VenedigMario MOBI î informationSee alsoSerbian.



10 thoughts on “Der Tod in VenedigMario und der Zauberer

  1. Fabian Fabian says:

    It's fantastic to be completely swayed by century old works; to be turned on completely by some German dude who probably thought so differently from you that anything he produced is just receptive to awe alone no discernible connections between you and the author exist Not true If you saw the dreadful film A Single Man or read the novel thought that the idea for that was elsewhere inscribed well you were super right It is this masterpiece by Thomas Mann it tries to emulate; an excursion to a Venice that with ironic signs of pestilence death still invites in the ideas of love artistic inspiration Aschenbach the fictional writer that was likely based on Mann himself takes a trip and takes us there with him When the omnipresent narrator gets inside of Aschenbach's head then describes in utter beauty the ugliness of the scene the main character's bittersweet and altogether human experience in the old world we have a forerunner to Patricia Highsmith's beloved The Talented Mr Ripley a brother to Hawthorne's The Marble Faun another Italian adventure with pah lenty of gay sensibility

  2. poncho poncho says:

    What do you mean Diotima' I said 'is love then evil and foul?' 'Hush' she cried; 'must that be foul which is not fair?' 'Certainly' I said 'And is that which is not wise ignorant? do you not see that there is a mean between wisdom and ignorance?' 'And what may that be?' I said 'Right opinion' she replied— Plato The Symposium trans by Benjamin Jowett Fuzzy Logic is a paradigm often applied to Artificial Intelligence though its applications may vary It’s a kind of logic that was introduced in order to contrast boolean logic wherein a variable’s value is strictly either 0 or 1 Therefore in fuzzy logic a variable may fall in the range between 0 and 1 showing a accurate approach on how in the real world things are or at least should be For example according to some a 400 page book may be mildly long but for others it may be slightly long whereas for someone else it may be short We classify things this way in fuzzy logic not just as either black or white big or small zero or one right or wrong — and not even completely heterosexual or completely homosexual in regards to sexuality Thus it shouldn’t be a scandal that a straight man feels attraction towards another man age aside like it happened to Thomas Mann in 1911 when he took a trip to Venice where he met Władzio a boy who inspired the writer’s subject of beauty his Phaedrus his god his literary inspiration and fascination Whereas Mann wasn’t actually as absorbed as to stalking the boy throughout the Piazza di San Marco he certainly was compelled by him according to his wife So one may say that this did happen On the other hand bringing back my introductory efforts to state that emotions aren’t ruled by boolean logic Death in Venice is often regarded as a beautiful approach to ueer literature — beautiful as we scarcely find in great classics — even though the author thereof isn’t exactly ueerMann transferred his experience in Venice to Gustav von Aschenbach a 50 ish year old writer and widower who after an opening scene decides to take a trip to clear his mind in order for his work to bloom again The aforementioned opening scene is that of a mysterious man in a cemetery and Aschenbach’s lugubrious omen and sudden decision to go to Venice; and from this point on one falls under a sort of sombre ambience and an ill spell that won’t leave the reader until the final paragraph Many things happen delightfully described but as for the main thread at his arrival at the hotel and precisely at supper Aschenbach meets Tadzio a young boy who catches his attention immediately and its then when the plot begins to unravel into a deadly and dreadful ending Mann keeps symbolisms constant and fate also plays an important part as when he intends to leave Venice due to health issues his luggage keeps him from doing so He also makes allusions to greek mythology especially Plato’s Symposium relating Aschenbach and Tadzio to Socrates and Phaedrus in a reverie of sorts and exposing the greek philosopher’s ideas of beauty love and the god thereof — that is Eros who resides in the loving rather than the beloved Also Mann in my opinion tried to un taboo the love between two men whose ages are disproportionate using Socrates’s ideal of love and to remark that there’s nothing despicable about the beauty of the senses that resides in youth drawn to the kind of beauty that is rather spiritual and resides in maturity — that love as we know it is rather fuzzy than boolean and it is always beautiful and somewhat artistic The dark side of it lies in the abuse and the excess of this passion when it becomes dangerous not only to oneself but also to the beloved having both well beings at risk like Aschenbach did keeping the truth about Venice to himself in a frenzy and feverish delusion that his love for Tadzio was still pure Nothing is bizarre ticklish than a relationship between two people who know each other only with their eyes—who encounter observe each other daily even hourly never greeting never speaking constrained by convention or by caprice to keep acting the indifferent strangers They experience discomfort and overwrought curiosity the hysteria of an unsatis fied unnaturally stifled need to recognize and to exchange and they especially feel something like a tense mutual esteem For people love and honor someone so long as they cannot judge him and yearning is a product of defective knowledge Death in Venice is doubtless an incredible masterpiece not only because of its lyrical and delightful prose and because it challenges the reader to bring the barriers of taboo down but also because of this sense of personal approach that makes a great work great that is the writer’s ability to touch and kindle our souls — like Mann himself wrote But even on a personal level art is after all a sublime life It delights deeply it consumes swiftly It carves the traces of imaginary intellectual adventures into the features of its servant The rest of the stories are magnificent as well — not as engrossing as the Venice but still worth reading in order to appreciate how most of their characters share the same artistic obsessive and solitary nature of Aschenbach; like Tonio Kröger a literate young man who struggles with life in the arena of literature; or Spinell a lonesome writer in a sanatorium found in Tristan the novella that would later develop into The Magic Mountain Overall there’s bleakness in Mann’s world but then again there is always beauty to be found in the bleakThomas Mann captivated me literarily but also personally view spoilerand part of me died with Aschenbach in his efforts to reach beauty hide spoiler

  3. James Catt James Catt says:

    I just finished reading this marvelous book of short stories My favorite among them was Little Herr Freidman a sad tale of a mans peace of mind turned on its head by desire

  4. David David says:

    I stand between two worlds am at home in neither and in conseuence have rather a hard time of it You artists call me a commoner and commoners feel tempted to arrest me I do not know which wounds me bitterly Commoners are stupid; but you worshippers of beauty who call me phlegmatic and without yearning ought to reflect that there is an artistry so deep so primordial and elemental that no yearning seems to it sweeter and worthy of tasting than that for the raptures of common placenessIT'S SO HARD TO BE AN ARTIST YOU GUYSI have heard Thomas Mann described as this towering literary genius a monumental figure of German literature So I was kind of looking forward to Death in Venice and other stories as a sampler before maybe I try one of his novels Well his short stories have killed that desire stone cold deadI won't deny he's great with language He slowly painstakingly verbosely paints the inner and outer lives and pained souls of all these lugubrious connoisseurs of truth and beauty who are all just so woeful and tormented and woe woe woe But each and every story was slooooooow and went basically nowhere It's like staring at a painting And staring And staring And staring The first few minutes yeah it's beautiful and I suppose if you are a true lover of fine arts you can probably stare at it for hours and be entranced but I would like to move on and look at something elseThe most interesting part of this collection was the translator's notes on how difficult it was to render Thomas Mann's elegiac German into elegiac English The linguistic structures of German which Mann makes proficient masterful use of are different enough from English that translation reuires nearly as much artistry as that possessed by the original writer A straightforward idiomatic translation simply won't capture Mann's use of languageUnfortunately for a bunch of racy tales about incest and pedophilia Mann managed to bore me out of my mind and also make me suirm at what a creeper he is The title story Death in Venice is about an old writer who becomes so infatuated with a young boy that he stalks the kid all over Venice while moping about how unbearably beautiful the boy isYes there are lots and lots of allusions and metaphors Death in Venice is a protracted exercise in literary allusions as are Sieglinde and Siegmund in The Blood of the WalsungsShe kissed him on his closed eyelids; he kissed her on her throat beneath the lace she wore They kissed each other's hands They loved each other with all the sweetness of the senses each for the other's spoilt and costly well being and delicious fragrance They breathed it in this fragrance with languid and voluptuous abandon like self centred invalids consoling themselves for the loss of hope They forgot themselves in caresses which took the upper hand passing over the tumult of passion dying away into sobbingAww that's so sweet and kind of steamyAnd by the way they're brother and sisterSo from the incestuous Sieglinde and Siegmund to the tormented angsty artist Tonio Kröger to the doomed writer Gustav von Aschenbach in Death in Venice there are an awful lot of whiners and people who are either having inappropriate sex or wallowing in misery thinking about people they want to have inappropriate sex with This is stroke fiction for tormented German intellectuals I really wanted to like these stories because as I said Thomas Mann is supposed to be great but ughThis collection included the following stories of which only a couple left an impression on me and the rest kind of passed over me as I sank into a glazed stupor The Will for HappinessTristanLittle Herr FriedemannTobias MindernickelLittle LizzyGladius DeiThe Starvelings A StudyThe WunderkindHarsh HoursTonio KrögerThe Blood of the WalsungsDeath in VeniceOkay go ahead and tell me I'm an uncultured peasant It's not like I'm some short attention span teenager who can't stand literary fiction But I'm starting to think I just don't like German literature I still need to give Hermann Hesse one shot and maybe maybe I will try one of Thomas Mann's novels But not any time soon I am giving this 2 stars which I'm sure is a crime against the Aesir but even though I normally rate books based on a combination of how well I enjoyed them and how well written I think they are — and Mann is a great writer I can see that — 3 stars would mean that I didn't find the experience completely unenjoyable and frankly I was dying to be done with this

  5. Richard Derus Richard Derus says:

    The Book Report I feel a complete fool providing a plot précis for this canonical work Gustav von Ascherbach literary lion in his sixties wanders about his home town of Munich while struggling with a recalcitrant new story His chance encounter with a weirdo though no words are exchanged between them ignites in Herr von Ascherbach the need to get out of town to get himself to the delicious fleshpots of the South An abortive stay in Illyria now Bosnia or Montenegro or Croatia no knowing which since we're not given much to go on leads him to make his second journey to Venice Arriving in the sin capital of the early modern world and even in the early 20th century possessed of a louche reputation brings him into contact with two life changing things A beautiful teenaged boy and cholera I think the title fills you in on the restMy Review I know this was written in 1911 1912 and is therefore to be judged by the standards of another era but I am bone weary of stories featuring men whose love for other males brings them to disaster and death This is the story that started me on that path of dislike Von Ascherbach realizes he's in love for the first time in his pinched narrow life and it's with a 14 year old boy; his response is to make himself ridiculous following the kid around staying in his Venetian Garden of Eros despite knowing for sure there's a cholera epidemic despite being warned of the dangers of staying despite smelling decay and death and miasmic uccchiness all around because he's in love But with the wrong kind of persona male Therefore Mann makes him pay the ultimate price he loses his life because he gives in and falls hopelessly stupidly in love With a male Mann makes his judgment of this moral turpitude even explicit by making it a chaste though to modern eyes not unreuited love between an old man and a boy Explicit references to Classical culture aside the entire atmosphere of the novel is uite evidently designed to point up the absurdity and the impossibility of such a love being rewarding or rewarded It's not in the least mysterious what Mann's after Denial denial denial It's your only salvation faggots Deny yourself don't let yourself feel anything rather than feel thatThis book offends my sensibilities Gorgeously built images and sonorously elegant sentences earn it all of its points

  6. Patrick.G.P Patrick.G.P says:

    The short stories of Thomas Mann often revolve around troubled society families and struggling artists His depictions of the toils and troubles of artistic and sensitive people can read as the author himself longed for a less complicated relationship with the world around him His artists yearn to belong deeply to the society around them and as in Tonio Krôger looks at society and people from the outside always feeling somewhat removed from humanity His characters are deeply sketched and their inner workings are laid bare in a startling manner without ever drawing any conclusions from them Mann’s prose is deep colorful and masterly showing people who struggle with emotions and their place within a family and society often tragic and at times even funny One of the tales that resonated heavily with me was Tristan the beautiful young woman admitted to an asylum with lung disease and the strange writer who falls for her Here as in other stories Mann commands a firm grasp over myths and classical literature both using them as powerful allegories but also substituting their original meaning in a playful manner Death in Venice stands as a masterpiece of the collection the complex inner workings of the protagonist the intense descriptions of the awkward feelings towards the young boy together with masterly use of allusions and metaphor combine to create one of the most striking short stories of the collection Art intellect old age love and how we deal with these issues either meeting them head on or creating illusions to ourselves and those around us These are the central themes of the novella and Mann’s dense and beautifully evocative prose is pure joy to read creating a pervasive sense of gloom through the story both in its protagonist and the diseased city around himThomas Mann’s stories are wonderful and thought provoking demanding the reader’s attention and digestion as he concerns himself with perhaps the core part of our humanity our longing to belong to create and to love and how we often never find a concrete answer to these problems These short stories are highly recommended and I am already preparing a further dive into Mann’s bibliography

  7. Josh Friedlander Josh Friedlander says:

    I got this collection primarily for Death in Venice during a trip to Venice how cliché but I read the others first and I think they set it up well Having previously read Mann's bloated monster The Magic Mountain I wasn't uite sure how to place him Reading this with some input from the helpful German lang Wikipedia gave me some valuable background It is as well Mann writes in Death in Venice that the world knows only a fine piece of work and not its origins But that is disingenuous because many of Mann's stories very obviously reflect his own life The archetypal Mann hero is the shy awkward romantic from a respected but dull Hanseatic trading family who yearns for true love the warm South and literary greatness Writing mainly in the first half of the 20th c Mann was aware of this trope as somewhat dusty and usually plays it skew or sometimes outright for laughs Also Mann wrote about perverse sex lusting after young boys totally based on his life twincest based on his wife Katia's Perhaps not unusually for people who had seen the Weimar bohemia evaporate and fled the Nazis into exile several members of the Mann family many of whom were writers took their own livesA uick breakdown of the plots of these storiesnovellas The Will for Happiness is a short story about an old sick man who loves a young woman Tristan mini Magic Mountain A Tristan and Isolde story in a sanatorium But mildy satirical Little Herr Friedmann is a crippled but otherwise successful man who thinks he can live without love then falls in love revealing Ibsen's idea of the Lebenslüge it doesn't end well Gladius Dei a Savonarola type zealot rails against art Tobias Mindernickel a satire of the idea of the angry reclusive old guy with a heart of gold If animal abuse makes you sueamish maybe give this one a miss Little Lizzy a man prepares an artsy version of a pop song It ends badly The Starvelings self pitying artist type feels whiny Harsh Hour the artist sees himself in the disguised body of Schiller struggling to write but still banging it out in the end The Wunderkind comic story about well a wunderkind Tonio Kröger for me the Platonic Mann story A writer grows up lonely becomes famous in the South heads back to his hometown and doesn't like it much The Blood of the Walsungs two self hating half Jewish twins hook up Death in Venice in contrast to Tonio Kröger a man heads from the dull North to Venice lusts after a Polish kid andwell I don't want to spoil it but read the title carefullyI think one generally becomes a better reader as one grows older because the elements of time and place in each story start to blur and one remembers the recurrent parts Mann's characters wimpy pale and overmannered might seem a little ridiculous but the path they take in trying to achieve friendship fame and meaning in life recur in age after age

  8. Schmacko Schmacko says:

    I know it’s a crying shame I haven’t read this classic years ago And now having read it I can say “What a fascinating disturbing little melodrama ” set this brief but dense book aside and then never pick it up againDeath in Venice by Thomas Mann was published in 1912 It’s about Gustav von Aschenbach a successful septuagenarian German author who leaves his very staid regimental life for a whim filled holiday in Venice While there Aschenbach slowly shrugs off his straightjacket existence and starts to feel fiery passion This is brought on by another vacationer to the island – a 14 year old Polish boy named TadzioDeath in Venice is about what 70 year old Aschenbach’s passion means Is it an artist’s appreciation of physical beauty? Is it the sickly old author longing after his own youth acknowledging that that Tadzio takes youth for granted not even realizing that his beauty is fleeting Is Aschenbach a pedophile? Is his unnatural lust brought on by Aschenbach’s previously restrictive existence?Mann does a beautiful job of balancing all these complicated uestions in a story that is both prosaic and tense The book veers from being a confessional of sickness to an uncomfortable apologist creed for pedophilia as an education for the youth and an appreciation of physical beauty by older men I happen to be a strong believer in social structure and propriety on this given subject so I found myself a little sueamish even the though the book itself is otherwise chaste I was frustrated by Mann’s ability to both vilify the emotion and then create a shaky logic for why it exists In that sense the book is very successfulIn another sense this book is pure 1912 melodrama A horrible plague has befallen Venice a mysterious malady that becomes a major plot point Aschenbach plummets from his formerly logical and lofty moral values into an obsessed and passion controlled wisp of a thing Achenbach is erudite enough that he goes into long narratives about the history of man boy love and its acceptance in other cultures You can feel the German trying to justify his own increasingly senseless emotions as he grows both physically and mentally sicker Finally it’s blindingly clear that the mystery disease and Achenbach’s lust are parallel metaphors in which Mann gives his final judgment on the overarching subject of the book – the appreciating of youthful beauty versus pedophilic lustI get it I read it I can move on

  9. Barbara Barbara says:

    When I was in college I read Death in Venice for the first time I can't imagine what I made of it then Of course the story of an older man drawn to a beautiful young boy is compelling but the sense of time running out can't have meant much to me at that point in my life I read the novella again recently and was struck by its power Mann captures so effectively the emptiness of Von Aschenbach's life Though the story is full of people he is apart alone a writer a recorder of life not a participant His growing infatuation with Tadzio threatens his safe world but his desire for contact with the boy overwhelms everything else Here is part of how Mann describes Tadzio when Von Aschenbach seems him for the second time It was the head of Eros with the yellowish bloom of Parian marble with fine serious brows and dusky clustering ringlets standing out in soft plenteousness over temples and ears In the beginning he is a statue something beautiful to admire Yet at the end of the book Mann writes Once he paused to look with a sudden recollection or by an impulse he turned from the waist up in an exuisite movement one hand resting on his hip and looked over his shoulder at the shore The watcher sat just as he had sat that time in the lobby of the hotel when first the twilit grey eyes met his own It seemed to him the pale and lovely Summoner smiled at him and beckoned

  10. Siria Siria says:

    I'm ambivalent about this one Perhaps it was the translation I was reading I think I have the actual Der Tod in Venedig in the house somewhere but frankly I couldn't face literary German at the moment but I never really felt at ease when reading this Not because of any of the themes that Mann tackled or because of the denseness of the work; they were challenging and thought provoking aspects of course but I found myself able to grapple with themWhat unnerved me was the way in which all the protagonists seemed to be so utterly detached from society while at the same time being so changed so warped so created by its conventions I suppose this is in part because Mann was so heavily influenced by Nietzche and I have really never liked Nietzche There was no part of me which felt able to connect to the characters Von Aschenbach in 'Death in Venice' left me unmoved; the eponymous Tonio Kroger did manage to move me but only to the extent that I wanted to smack him over the head for his pretentiousnessWhen it comes down to style and elegance and observation I can certainly appreciate Mann's achievement I just can't like him as a writer

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10 thoughts on “Der Tod in VenedigMario und der Zauberer

  1. Fabian Fabian says:

    It's fantastic to be completely swayed by century old works; to be turned on completely by some German dude who probably thought so differently from you that anything he produced is just receptive to awe alone no discernible connections between you and the author exist Not true If you saw the dreadful film A Single Man or read the novel thought that the idea for that was elsewhere inscribed well you were super right It is this masterpiece by Thomas Mann it tries to emulate; an excursion to a Venice that with ironic signs of pestilence death still invites in the ideas of love artistic inspiration Aschenbach the fictional writer that was likely based on Mann himself takes a trip and takes us there with him When the omnipresent narrator gets inside of Aschenbach's head then describes in utter beauty the ugliness of the scene the main character's bittersweet and altogether human experience in the old world we have a forerunner to Patricia Highsmith's beloved The Talented Mr Ripley a brother to Hawthorne's The Marble Faun another Italian adventure with pah lenty of gay sensibility

  2. poncho poncho says:

    What do you mean Diotima' I said 'is love then evil and foul?' 'Hush' she cried; 'must that be foul which is not fair?' 'Certainly' I said 'And is that which is not wise ignorant? do you not see that there is a mean between wisdom and ignorance?' 'And what may that be?' I said 'Right opinion' she replied— Plato The Symposium trans by Benjamin Jowett Fuzzy Logic is a paradigm often applied to Artificial Intelligence though its applications may vary It’s a kind of logic that was introduced in order to contrast boolean logic wherein a variable’s value is strictly either 0 or 1 Therefore in fuzzy logic a variable may fall in the range between 0 and 1 showing a accurate approach on how in the real world things are or at least should be For example according to some a 400 page book may be mildly long but for others it may be slightly long whereas for someone else it may be short We classify things this way in fuzzy logic not just as either black or white big or small zero or one right or wrong — and not even completely heterosexual or completely homosexual in regards to sexuality Thus it shouldn’t be a scandal that a straight man feels attraction towards another man age aside like it happened to Thomas Mann in 1911 when he took a trip to Venice where he met Władzio a boy who inspired the writer’s subject of beauty his Phaedrus his god his literary inspiration and fascination Whereas Mann wasn’t actually as absorbed as to stalking the boy throughout the Piazza di San Marco he certainly was compelled by him according to his wife So one may say that this did happen On the other hand bringing back my introductory efforts to state that emotions aren’t ruled by boolean logic Death in Venice is often regarded as a beautiful approach to ueer literature — beautiful as we scarcely find in great classics — even though the author thereof isn’t exactly ueerMann transferred his experience in Venice to Gustav von Aschenbach a 50 ish year old writer and widower who after an opening scene decides to take a trip to clear his mind in order for his work to bloom again The aforementioned opening scene is that of a mysterious man in a cemetery and Aschenbach’s lugubrious omen and sudden decision to go to Venice; and from this point on one falls under a sort of sombre ambience and an ill spell that won’t leave the reader until the final paragraph Many things happen delightfully described but as for the main thread at his arrival at the hotel and precisely at supper Aschenbach meets Tadzio a young boy who catches his attention immediately and its then when the plot begins to unravel into a deadly and dreadful ending Mann keeps symbolisms constant and fate also plays an important part as when he intends to leave Venice due to health issues his luggage keeps him from doing so He also makes allusions to greek mythology especially Plato’s Symposium relating Aschenbach and Tadzio to Socrates and Phaedrus in a reverie of sorts and exposing the greek philosopher’s ideas of beauty love and the god thereof — that is Eros who resides in the loving rather than the beloved Also Mann in my opinion tried to un taboo the love between two men whose ages are disproportionate using Socrates’s ideal of love and to remark that there’s nothing despicable about the beauty of the senses that resides in youth drawn to the kind of beauty that is rather spiritual and resides in maturity — that love as we know it is rather fuzzy than boolean and it is always beautiful and somewhat artistic The dark side of it lies in the abuse and the excess of this passion when it becomes dangerous not only to oneself but also to the beloved having both well beings at risk like Aschenbach did keeping the truth about Venice to himself in a frenzy and feverish delusion that his love for Tadzio was still pure Nothing is bizarre ticklish than a relationship between two people who know each other only with their eyes—who encounter observe each other daily even hourly never greeting never speaking constrained by convention or by caprice to keep acting the indifferent strangers They experience discomfort and overwrought curiosity the hysteria of an unsatis fied unnaturally stifled need to recognize and to exchange and they especially feel something like a tense mutual esteem For people love and honor someone so long as they cannot judge him and yearning is a product of defective knowledge Death in Venice is doubtless an incredible masterpiece not only because of its lyrical and delightful prose and because it challenges the reader to bring the barriers of taboo down but also because of this sense of personal approach that makes a great work great that is the writer’s ability to touch and kindle our souls — like Mann himself wrote But even on a personal level art is after all a sublime life It delights deeply it consumes swiftly It carves the traces of imaginary intellectual adventures into the features of its servant The rest of the stories are magnificent as well — not as engrossing as the Venice but still worth reading in order to appreciate how most of their characters share the same artistic obsessive and solitary nature of Aschenbach; like Tonio Kröger a literate young man who struggles with life in the arena of literature; or Spinell a lonesome writer in a sanatorium found in Tristan the novella that would later develop into The Magic Mountain Overall there’s bleakness in Mann’s world but then again there is always beauty to be found in the bleakThomas Mann captivated me literarily but also personally view spoilerand part of me died with Aschenbach in his efforts to reach beauty hide spoiler

  3. James Catt James Catt says:

    I just finished reading this marvelous book of short stories My favorite among them was Little Herr Freidman a sad tale of a mans peace of mind turned on its head by desire

  4. David David says:

    I stand between two worlds am at home in neither and in conseuence have rather a hard time of it You artists call me a commoner and commoners feel tempted to arrest me I do not know which wounds me bitterly Commoners are stupid; but you worshippers of beauty who call me phlegmatic and without yearning ought to reflect that there is an artistry so deep so primordial and elemental that no yearning seems to it sweeter and worthy of tasting than that for the raptures of common placenessIT'S SO HARD TO BE AN ARTIST YOU GUYSI have heard Thomas Mann described as this towering literary genius a monumental figure of German literature So I was kind of looking forward to Death in Venice and other stories as a sampler before maybe I try one of his novels Well his short stories have killed that desire stone cold deadI won't deny he's great with language He slowly painstakingly verbosely paints the inner and outer lives and pained souls of all these lugubrious connoisseurs of truth and beauty who are all just so woeful and tormented and woe woe woe But each and every story was slooooooow and went basically nowhere It's like staring at a painting And staring And staring And staring The first few minutes yeah it's beautiful and I suppose if you are a true lover of fine arts you can probably stare at it for hours and be entranced but I would like to move on and look at something elseThe most interesting part of this collection was the translator's notes on how difficult it was to render Thomas Mann's elegiac German into elegiac English The linguistic structures of German which Mann makes proficient masterful use of are different enough from English that translation reuires nearly as much artistry as that possessed by the original writer A straightforward idiomatic translation simply won't capture Mann's use of languageUnfortunately for a bunch of racy tales about incest and pedophilia Mann managed to bore me out of my mind and also make me suirm at what a creeper he is The title story Death in Venice is about an old writer who becomes so infatuated with a young boy that he stalks the kid all over Venice while moping about how unbearably beautiful the boy isYes there are lots and lots of allusions and metaphors Death in Venice is a protracted exercise in literary allusions as are Sieglinde and Siegmund in The Blood of the WalsungsShe kissed him on his closed eyelids; he kissed her on her throat beneath the lace she wore They kissed each other's hands They loved each other with all the sweetness of the senses each for the other's spoilt and costly well being and delicious fragrance They breathed it in this fragrance with languid and voluptuous abandon like self centred invalids consoling themselves for the loss of hope They forgot themselves in caresses which took the upper hand passing over the tumult of passion dying away into sobbingAww that's so sweet and kind of steamyAnd by the way they're brother and sisterSo from the incestuous Sieglinde and Siegmund to the tormented angsty artist Tonio Kröger to the doomed writer Gustav von Aschenbach in Death in Venice there are an awful lot of whiners and people who are either having inappropriate sex or wallowing in misery thinking about people they want to have inappropriate sex with This is stroke fiction for tormented German intellectuals I really wanted to like these stories because as I said Thomas Mann is supposed to be great but ughThis collection included the following stories of which only a couple left an impression on me and the rest kind of passed over me as I sank into a glazed stupor The Will for HappinessTristanLittle Herr FriedemannTobias MindernickelLittle LizzyGladius DeiThe Starvelings A StudyThe WunderkindHarsh HoursTonio KrögerThe Blood of the WalsungsDeath in VeniceOkay go ahead and tell me I'm an uncultured peasant It's not like I'm some short attention span teenager who can't stand literary fiction But I'm starting to think I just don't like German literature I still need to give Hermann Hesse one shot and maybe maybe I will try one of Thomas Mann's novels But not any time soon I am giving this 2 stars which I'm sure is a crime against the Aesir but even though I normally rate books based on a combination of how well I enjoyed them and how well written I think they are — and Mann is a great writer I can see that — 3 stars would mean that I didn't find the experience completely unenjoyable and frankly I was dying to be done with this

  5. Richard Derus Richard Derus says:

    The Book Report I feel a complete fool providing a plot précis for this canonical work Gustav von Ascherbach literary lion in his sixties wanders about his home town of Munich while struggling with a recalcitrant new story His chance encounter with a weirdo though no words are exchanged between them ignites in Herr von Ascherbach the need to get out of town to get himself to the delicious fleshpots of the South An abortive stay in Illyria now Bosnia or Montenegro or Croatia no knowing which since we're not given much to go on leads him to make his second journey to Venice Arriving in the sin capital of the early modern world and even in the early 20th century possessed of a louche reputation brings him into contact with two life changing things A beautiful teenaged boy and cholera I think the title fills you in on the restMy Review I know this was written in 1911 1912 and is therefore to be judged by the standards of another era but I am bone weary of stories featuring men whose love for other males brings them to disaster and death This is the story that started me on that path of dislike Von Ascherbach realizes he's in love for the first time in his pinched narrow life and it's with a 14 year old boy; his response is to make himself ridiculous following the kid around staying in his Venetian Garden of Eros despite knowing for sure there's a cholera epidemic despite being warned of the dangers of staying despite smelling decay and death and miasmic uccchiness all around because he's in love But with the wrong kind of persona male Therefore Mann makes him pay the ultimate price he loses his life because he gives in and falls hopelessly stupidly in love With a male Mann makes his judgment of this moral turpitude even explicit by making it a chaste though to modern eyes not unreuited love between an old man and a boy Explicit references to Classical culture aside the entire atmosphere of the novel is uite evidently designed to point up the absurdity and the impossibility of such a love being rewarding or rewarded It's not in the least mysterious what Mann's after Denial denial denial It's your only salvation faggots Deny yourself don't let yourself feel anything rather than feel thatThis book offends my sensibilities Gorgeously built images and sonorously elegant sentences earn it all of its points

  6. Patrick.G.P Patrick.G.P says:

    The short stories of Thomas Mann often revolve around troubled society families and struggling artists His depictions of the toils and troubles of artistic and sensitive people can read as the author himself longed for a less complicated relationship with the world around him His artists yearn to belong deeply to the society around them and as in Tonio Krôger looks at society and people from the outside always feeling somewhat removed from humanity His characters are deeply sketched and their inner workings are laid bare in a startling manner without ever drawing any conclusions from them Mann’s prose is deep colorful and masterly showing people who struggle with emotions and their place within a family and society often tragic and at times even funny One of the tales that resonated heavily with me was Tristan the beautiful young woman admitted to an asylum with lung disease and the strange writer who falls for her Here as in other stories Mann commands a firm grasp over myths and classical literature both using them as powerful allegories but also substituting their original meaning in a playful manner Death in Venice stands as a masterpiece of the collection the complex inner workings of the protagonist the intense descriptions of the awkward feelings towards the young boy together with masterly use of allusions and metaphor combine to create one of the most striking short stories of the collection Art intellect old age love and how we deal with these issues either meeting them head on or creating illusions to ourselves and those around us These are the central themes of the novella and Mann’s dense and beautifully evocative prose is pure joy to read creating a pervasive sense of gloom through the story both in its protagonist and the diseased city around himThomas Mann’s stories are wonderful and thought provoking demanding the reader’s attention and digestion as he concerns himself with perhaps the core part of our humanity our longing to belong to create and to love and how we often never find a concrete answer to these problems These short stories are highly recommended and I am already preparing a further dive into Mann’s bibliography

  7. Josh Friedlander Josh Friedlander says:

    I got this collection primarily for Death in Venice during a trip to Venice how cliché but I read the others first and I think they set it up well Having previously read Mann's bloated monster The Magic Mountain I wasn't uite sure how to place him Reading this with some input from the helpful German lang Wikipedia gave me some valuable background It is as well Mann writes in Death in Venice that the world knows only a fine piece of work and not its origins But that is disingenuous because many of Mann's stories very obviously reflect his own life The archetypal Mann hero is the shy awkward romantic from a respected but dull Hanseatic trading family who yearns for true love the warm South and literary greatness Writing mainly in the first half of the 20th c Mann was aware of this trope as somewhat dusty and usually plays it skew or sometimes outright for laughs Also Mann wrote about perverse sex lusting after young boys totally based on his life twincest based on his wife Katia's Perhaps not unusually for people who had seen the Weimar bohemia evaporate and fled the Nazis into exile several members of the Mann family many of whom were writers took their own livesA uick breakdown of the plots of these storiesnovellas The Will for Happiness is a short story about an old sick man who loves a young woman Tristan mini Magic Mountain A Tristan and Isolde story in a sanatorium But mildy satirical Little Herr Friedmann is a crippled but otherwise successful man who thinks he can live without love then falls in love revealing Ibsen's idea of the Lebenslüge it doesn't end well Gladius Dei a Savonarola type zealot rails against art Tobias Mindernickel a satire of the idea of the angry reclusive old guy with a heart of gold If animal abuse makes you sueamish maybe give this one a miss Little Lizzy a man prepares an artsy version of a pop song It ends badly The Starvelings self pitying artist type feels whiny Harsh Hour the artist sees himself in the disguised body of Schiller struggling to write but still banging it out in the end The Wunderkind comic story about well a wunderkind Tonio Kröger for me the Platonic Mann story A writer grows up lonely becomes famous in the South heads back to his hometown and doesn't like it much The Blood of the Walsungs two self hating half Jewish twins hook up Death in Venice in contrast to Tonio Kröger a man heads from the dull North to Venice lusts after a Polish kid andwell I don't want to spoil it but read the title carefullyI think one generally becomes a better reader as one grows older because the elements of time and place in each story start to blur and one remembers the recurrent parts Mann's characters wimpy pale and overmannered might seem a little ridiculous but the path they take in trying to achieve friendship fame and meaning in life recur in age after age

  8. Schmacko Schmacko says:

    I know it’s a crying shame I haven’t read this classic years ago And now having read it I can say “What a fascinating disturbing little melodrama ” set this brief but dense book aside and then never pick it up againDeath in Venice by Thomas Mann was published in 1912 It’s about Gustav von Aschenbach a successful septuagenarian German author who leaves his very staid regimental life for a whim filled holiday in Venice While there Aschenbach slowly shrugs off his straightjacket existence and starts to feel fiery passion This is brought on by another vacationer to the island – a 14 year old Polish boy named TadzioDeath in Venice is about what 70 year old Aschenbach’s passion means Is it an artist’s appreciation of physical beauty? Is it the sickly old author longing after his own youth acknowledging that that Tadzio takes youth for granted not even realizing that his beauty is fleeting Is Aschenbach a pedophile? Is his unnatural lust brought on by Aschenbach’s previously restrictive existence?Mann does a beautiful job of balancing all these complicated uestions in a story that is both prosaic and tense The book veers from being a confessional of sickness to an uncomfortable apologist creed for pedophilia as an education for the youth and an appreciation of physical beauty by older men I happen to be a strong believer in social structure and propriety on this given subject so I found myself a little sueamish even the though the book itself is otherwise chaste I was frustrated by Mann’s ability to both vilify the emotion and then create a shaky logic for why it exists In that sense the book is very successfulIn another sense this book is pure 1912 melodrama A horrible plague has befallen Venice a mysterious malady that becomes a major plot point Aschenbach plummets from his formerly logical and lofty moral values into an obsessed and passion controlled wisp of a thing Achenbach is erudite enough that he goes into long narratives about the history of man boy love and its acceptance in other cultures You can feel the German trying to justify his own increasingly senseless emotions as he grows both physically and mentally sicker Finally it’s blindingly clear that the mystery disease and Achenbach’s lust are parallel metaphors in which Mann gives his final judgment on the overarching subject of the book – the appreciating of youthful beauty versus pedophilic lustI get it I read it I can move on

  9. Barbara Barbara says:

    When I was in college I read Death in Venice for the first time I can't imagine what I made of it then Of course the story of an older man drawn to a beautiful young boy is compelling but the sense of time running out can't have meant much to me at that point in my life I read the novella again recently and was struck by its power Mann captures so effectively the emptiness of Von Aschenbach's life Though the story is full of people he is apart alone a writer a recorder of life not a participant His growing infatuation with Tadzio threatens his safe world but his desire for contact with the boy overwhelms everything else Here is part of how Mann describes Tadzio when Von Aschenbach seems him for the second time It was the head of Eros with the yellowish bloom of Parian marble with fine serious brows and dusky clustering ringlets standing out in soft plenteousness over temples and ears In the beginning he is a statue something beautiful to admire Yet at the end of the book Mann writes Once he paused to look with a sudden recollection or by an impulse he turned from the waist up in an exuisite movement one hand resting on his hip and looked over his shoulder at the shore The watcher sat just as he had sat that time in the lobby of the hotel when first the twilit grey eyes met his own It seemed to him the pale and lovely Summoner smiled at him and beckoned

  10. Siria Siria says:

    I'm ambivalent about this one Perhaps it was the translation I was reading I think I have the actual Der Tod in Venedig in the house somewhere but frankly I couldn't face literary German at the moment but I never really felt at ease when reading this Not because of any of the themes that Mann tackled or because of the denseness of the work; they were challenging and thought provoking aspects of course but I found myself able to grapple with themWhat unnerved me was the way in which all the protagonists seemed to be so utterly detached from society while at the same time being so changed so warped so created by its conventions I suppose this is in part because Mann was so heavily influenced by Nietzche and I have really never liked Nietzche There was no part of me which felt able to connect to the characters Von Aschenbach in 'Death in Venice' left me unmoved; the eponymous Tonio Kroger did manage to move me but only to the extent that I wanted to smack him over the head for his pretentiousnessWhen it comes down to style and elegance and observation I can certainly appreciate Mann's achievement I just can't like him as a writer

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