The Age of Responsibility Kindle ´ The Age Kindle -

The Age of Responsibility Kindle ´ The Age Kindle -

The Age of Responsibility [Ebook] ➭ The Age of Responsibility ➬ Yascha Mounk – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk A novel focus on personal responsibility has transformed political thought and public policy in America and Europe Since the 1970s responsibility which once meant the moral duty to help and support ot A novel focus on personal responsibility has transformed political thought and public policy in America and Europe Since the s responsibility which once meant the moral duty to help and support others has come to suggest an obligation to be self sufficient This narrow conception of responsibility has guided recent reforms of the welfare The Age Kindle - state making key entitlements conditional on good behavior Drawing on intellectual history political theory and moral philosophy Yascha Mounk shows why The Age of Responsibility is pernicious and how it might be overcomePersonal responsibility began as a conservative catchphrase But over time leaders across the political spectrum came to subscribe to its underlying framework Today even egalitarian philosophers rarely uestion the normative importance of responsibility Emphasizing the pervasive influence of luck over our lives they cast the poor as victims who cannot be held responsible for their actionsMounk shows that today's focus on individual culpability is both wrong and counterproductive it distracts us from the larger economic forces determining aggregate outcomes ignores what we owe our fellow citizens regardless of their choices and blinds us to other key values such as the desire to live in a society of euals Recognizing that even society's neediest members seek to exercise genuine agency Mounk builds a positive conception of responsibility Instead of punishing individuals for their past choices he argues public policy should aim to empower them to take responsibility for themselves and those around them.


7 thoughts on “The Age of Responsibility

  1. Vipassana Vipassana says:

    The age of responsibility as Yascha Mounk calls it places emphasis on the moral status of an individuals as opposed to the needs of a community; and on the past action of particular agents as opposed to their ability to contribute in the future However the point of institutions is not reward good behaviour and punish bad bahviour but to serve a whole set of values and sustain those values over time Deciding what those values are depends on what we see the purpose of institutions to be and those values dictate how the welfare state functions The central theme is that people across the political spectrum have a punitive notion of personal responsibility and we need a positive conception of it He claims that both the left and right believe that welfare recipients should be denied welfare if it can be established that the recipient's actions has lead to hisher impoverished state it's just that the right has a very low threshold to establish a causal relationship whereas the left has a very high thresholdA key issue with the welfare system is that it doesn't treat the recipient as someone with agency but rather a hopeless being who may be subjected to a humiliating process in order to receive welfare Mounk claims that the time limits on welfare assistance imposed by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act don't help either Punitive conditions on the receipt of welfare don't provide the welfare recipient with agency This kind of conditionality keeps the people who need welfare the most out of the system A positive notion of responsibility is one that should allow an individual to have some control on the outcome of hisher efforts An example of this is a field experiment at a JobCenter in Essex where job seekers were asked to make specific commitments for the future rather than prove that the had been making efforts to seek a job in the past The number of job seekers going into paid employment rose significantly The path to understanding the positive conception of responsibility starts with a chapter dedicated to a philosophical examination of attributing responsibility for an outcome to an agent He asks whether there has to be a causal link between action and outcome in order for the agent to be held responsible in an institutional sense His answer is no However he doesn't believe that it is necessary to impose conditions on welfare unless help recipients progress It made me think that the ascription of responsibility should be done by the agent in this case the welfare recipient To understand why this is important apart from being a decent way to treat a person Yascha Mounk makes the case that humans need to feel like they have agency in order to feel fulfilled and while many arenas of public life allow a person to feel that was the welfare system does notThe examination of luck choice and institutional values made me examine to point behind the work that I do the pointlessness behind some other things and not be bothered by the lack of concrete answers to either issue I'm sure Mounk did not set out to write a self help book but for me it was one However he concludes the chapter by saying that we should thus give up the idea that we could ever integrate a philosophically subtle notion of reponsibility into political practice He argues that ascribing responsibility in public policy should be about upholding the values that institutions stand for What those values are is up for discussion but Mounk believes that the establishment of an eual world is one of themAs an example of how the punitive conception of personal responsibility affects activism there is a brave and necessary exploration of gay rights and the language surrounding the movement that I had longed to hear Yascha Mounk doesn’t attempt to find any root causes to ueer ness but attacks the premise that ueer ness has to be an inherent 'born this way' aspect of a person to be legitimate How does that matter? Irrespective of why people are ueer they are and have right to life and community the way any straight cis person would I've always found the 'born this way’ language uite patronizing and Mounk made it so much clearer in my head as to why The operating principle of this book is taken from uentin Skinner's Liberty Before Liberalism and states that it is easy to become bewitched into thinking that the way of thinking about the concepts beueathed to us by the mainstream intellectual tradition must be the way of thinking about them and Yascha Mounk masterfully excavates the ossified intellectual reasoning behind welfare policy and to some extent policy making broadly


  2. Steve Steve says:

    Excellent book well written and thought provoking Complex topics but very readable I'd love to read his thoughts about crime and the justice system; he mentioned these issues a little bit but I think he didn't want to get side tracked away from welfare type issues And hurrah for 200 page books But the uestions of responsibility and deservedness seem very similar I thought the one shortcoming of the book is that it seemed to be only looking at the relationship between the state and welfare recipients and I think it may not have paid adeuate attention to citizens who are mostly usually not welfare recipients Their perspective is important also if they feel used and ignored by both the state and the recipients they turn into a nasty political force that isn't good for anyone


  3. Alexis Alexis says:

    We live in the age of responsibility But Yascha Mounk argues we have progressively narrowed our view of what responsibility means in the political sphere It has been reduced solely to personal responsibility for outcomes in one's own life and we have come to believe in the notion that benefits should be conditional on that responsibility The left has responded by denying that individuals are responsible focusing on structural flaws While there is truth in their arguments it ultimately buys in to the responsibility framework Rather than attacking conditionality itself it says that it doesn't apply Since people don't like the perceived message that they lack personal agency the argument can turn off those it's meant to excuse Mounk argues that instead we need to reconceive the notion of responsibility in a positive form This is not an easy book to read it was Mounk's dissertation and it shows Familiarity with the basics of philosophy and political philosophy are mandatory and although it's a short book it's not an easy read Nonetheless the ideas are fascinating and potentially an important contribution to political debate We spend all our time arguing about individual responsibility for outcomes and none about our responsibility towards others and the responsibility of our institutions towards others The last chapter is in some ways the weakest because Mounk tries too hard to keep it apolitical and the examples are nonspecific


  4. Andrew Carter Andrew Carter says:

    Am not learned in this subject and had some difficulty reading this book; however there was much to appreciate in the presentation of ideas It seems to me that much of the focus on the welfare situation addressed either personal choices gone bad or the environment in which the recipient resides and the difficulty of reaching a clear focus in dispersing welfare I like the positive or supportive approachone that views the effort being extended by the potential recipient to achieve some level of recognition or self sufficiency Is someone really trying to be self sufficient and what can others do to facilitate the outcome


  5. Derkaisermike Derkaisermike says:

    Excellent Mounk does a fantastic job of carefully pulling apart the threads to examine the shift of understanding of responsibility in the western world over the past few decades following a change of predominantly responsibility as duty to responsibility as accountability and the implications to the welfareworkfare state and systems Laying out a detailed argument against the punitive nature of current views on responsibility and accountability he makes the case for a positive responsibilityaccountability to replace it Well worth the read


  6. Eli Weinstein Eli Weinstein says:

    Extraordinarily clear and well reasoned concise arguments that all fit together beautifully Integrates public policy cultural criticism history and many areas of modern philosophy and political theory


  7. Uptownbookwormnyc Uptownbookwormnyc says:

    preaching to the choir


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7 thoughts on “The Age of Responsibility

  1. Vipassana Vipassana says:

    The age of responsibility as Yascha Mounk calls it places emphasis on the moral status of an individuals as opposed to the needs of a community; and on the past action of particular agents as opposed to their ability to contribute in the future However the point of institutions is not reward good behaviour and punish bad bahviour but to serve a whole set of values and sustain those values over time Deciding what those values are depends on what we see the purpose of institutions to be and those values dictate how the welfare state functions The central theme is that people across the political spectrum have a punitive notion of personal responsibility and we need a positive conception of it He claims that both the left and right believe that welfare recipients should be denied welfare if it can be established that the recipient's actions has lead to hisher impoverished state it's just that the right has a very low threshold to establish a causal relationship whereas the left has a very high thresholdA key issue with the welfare system is that it doesn't treat the recipient as someone with agency but rather a hopeless being who may be subjected to a humiliating process in order to receive welfare Mounk claims that the time limits on welfare assistance imposed by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act don't help either Punitive conditions on the receipt of welfare don't provide the welfare recipient with agency This kind of conditionality keeps the people who need welfare the most out of the system A positive notion of responsibility is one that should allow an individual to have some control on the outcome of hisher efforts An example of this is a field experiment at a JobCenter in Essex where job seekers were asked to make specific commitments for the future rather than prove that the had been making efforts to seek a job in the past The number of job seekers going into paid employment rose significantly The path to understanding the positive conception of responsibility starts with a chapter dedicated to a philosophical examination of attributing responsibility for an outcome to an agent He asks whether there has to be a causal link between action and outcome in order for the agent to be held responsible in an institutional sense His answer is no However he doesn't believe that it is necessary to impose conditions on welfare unless help recipients progress It made me think that the ascription of responsibility should be done by the agent in this case the welfare recipient To understand why this is important apart from being a decent way to treat a person Yascha Mounk makes the case that humans need to feel like they have agency in order to feel fulfilled and while many arenas of public life allow a person to feel that was the welfare system does notThe examination of luck choice and institutional values made me examine to point behind the work that I do the pointlessness behind some other things and not be bothered by the lack of concrete answers to either issue I'm sure Mounk did not set out to write a self help book but for me it was one However he concludes the chapter by saying that we should thus give up the idea that we could ever integrate a philosophically subtle notion of reponsibility into political practice He argues that ascribing responsibility in public policy should be about upholding the values that institutions stand for What those values are is up for discussion but Mounk believes that the establishment of an eual world is one of themAs an example of how the punitive conception of personal responsibility affects activism there is a brave and necessary exploration of gay rights and the language surrounding the movement that I had longed to hear Yascha Mounk doesn’t attempt to find any root causes to ueer ness but attacks the premise that ueer ness has to be an inherent 'born this way' aspect of a person to be legitimate How does that matter? Irrespective of why people are ueer they are and have right to life and community the way any straight cis person would I've always found the 'born this way’ language uite patronizing and Mounk made it so much clearer in my head as to why The operating principle of this book is taken from uentin Skinner's Liberty Before Liberalism and states that it is easy to become bewitched into thinking that the way of thinking about the concepts beueathed to us by the mainstream intellectual tradition must be the way of thinking about them and Yascha Mounk masterfully excavates the ossified intellectual reasoning behind welfare policy and to some extent policy making broadly

  2. Steve Steve says:

    Excellent book well written and thought provoking Complex topics but very readable I'd love to read his thoughts about crime and the justice system; he mentioned these issues a little bit but I think he didn't want to get side tracked away from welfare type issues And hurrah for 200 page books But the uestions of responsibility and deservedness seem very similar I thought the one shortcoming of the book is that it seemed to be only looking at the relationship between the state and welfare recipients and I think it may not have paid adeuate attention to citizens who are mostly usually not welfare recipients Their perspective is important also if they feel used and ignored by both the state and the recipients they turn into a nasty political force that isn't good for anyone

  3. Alexis Alexis says:

    We live in the age of responsibility But Yascha Mounk argues we have progressively narrowed our view of what responsibility means in the political sphere It has been reduced solely to personal responsibility for outcomes in one's own life and we have come to believe in the notion that benefits should be conditional on that responsibility The left has responded by denying that individuals are responsible focusing on structural flaws While there is truth in their arguments it ultimately buys in to the responsibility framework Rather than attacking conditionality itself it says that it doesn't apply Since people don't like the perceived message that they lack personal agency the argument can turn off those it's meant to excuse Mounk argues that instead we need to reconceive the notion of responsibility in a positive form This is not an easy book to read it was Mounk's dissertation and it shows Familiarity with the basics of philosophy and political philosophy are mandatory and although it's a short book it's not an easy read Nonetheless the ideas are fascinating and potentially an important contribution to political debate We spend all our time arguing about individual responsibility for outcomes and none about our responsibility towards others and the responsibility of our institutions towards others The last chapter is in some ways the weakest because Mounk tries too hard to keep it apolitical and the examples are nonspecific

  4. Andrew Carter Andrew Carter says:

    Am not learned in this subject and had some difficulty reading this book; however there was much to appreciate in the presentation of ideas It seems to me that much of the focus on the welfare situation addressed either personal choices gone bad or the environment in which the recipient resides and the difficulty of reaching a clear focus in dispersing welfare I like the positive or supportive approachone that views the effort being extended by the potential recipient to achieve some level of recognition or self sufficiency Is someone really trying to be self sufficient and what can others do to facilitate the outcome

  5. Derkaisermike Derkaisermike says:

    Excellent Mounk does a fantastic job of carefully pulling apart the threads to examine the shift of understanding of responsibility in the western world over the past few decades following a change of predominantly responsibility as duty to responsibility as accountability and the implications to the welfareworkfare state and systems Laying out a detailed argument against the punitive nature of current views on responsibility and accountability he makes the case for a positive responsibilityaccountability to replace it Well worth the read

  6. Eli Weinstein Eli Weinstein says:

    Extraordinarily clear and well reasoned concise arguments that all fit together beautifully Integrates public policy cultural criticism history and many areas of modern philosophy and political theory

  7. Uptownbookwormnyc Uptownbookwormnyc says:

    preaching to the choir

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