The Wrong Boy Kindle ✓ The Wrong PDF or

The Wrong Boy Kindle ✓ The Wrong PDF or

The Wrong Boy [Download] ➵ The Wrong Boy Author Willy Russell – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Der Tag an dem der elfjährige Raymond Marks in einer Schulpause per Zufall das Fliegenfangen erfindet ändert alles Das harmlose Spiel führt für Raymond zu einem tragikomischen Leben als Außenseit Der Tag an dem der elfjährige Raymond Marks in einer Schulpause per Zufall das Fliegenfangen erfindet ändert alles Das harmlose Spiel führt für Raymond zu einem tragikomischen Leben als Außenseiter und Sonderling bis er schließlich seine ganz persönliche Unabhängigkeitserklärung entwickelt.


10 thoughts on “The Wrong Boy

  1. Silvanna Silvanna says:

    The Wrong Boy started out fine However it became frustratingly repetitive after the first 100 pages And that section about the Cowboy was so long winded Perhaps it was simply too Lincolnshire for me to enjoy me being a Californian girl


  2. Dardenitaaa Dardenitaaa says:

    Have you ever read a book that made you howl in laughter Have your eyes nearly popped wide open because of a clever plot twist Have you ever decided to pause halfway through the chapters because you’re in denial that the book is nearing its end Have you ever finished a story and immediately wished you could hug the fictional protagonist after the last pageI say yes to all of the above thanks to Willy Russell’s stunning first novel—The Wrong Boy—which is in every way unforgettable Written in the form of confessional letters and journal entries by 19 year old Raymond James Marks to his idol Morrissey this novel is in eual parts hilarious and heartbreaking; It’s sad sweet shocking and satisfying which basically means it easily made its way to my lists of all time favourite books ever and well—straight inside my dorky reader heartThe Wrong Boy’s plot is engaging enough to keep a reader leafing like mad through its witty and dark dialogue it is a comic coming of age odyssey of a misunderstood teenage intellectual and die hard Smiths fan his painfully erratic past and his troublesome present state Raymond the book’s hero chronicles his alternating and almost never ending dilemmas with lots of heart and humour evident in his laugh out loud narrative both in prose and poetryLike an intelligent teenage sitcom gone haywire the book is filled with crazy turn of events which unsurprisingly heaved greater havoc in Raymond’s life We get unusual ones like the Transvestite Nativity Play Scandal in his early school years to his accidental discovery of the flytrapping craze and his eventual expulsion But we also get dark disturbing themes like his having linked with the rape of a neighbourhood girl his parent’s weird love affairs and his admission to a mental facility And he oh so beautifully captured each of these life altering changes with such profound reflections and child like honesty that you can’t help but love him so The book is a screaming testament that a painful childhood is indeed the best preparation in the making of a wonderful writerAside from the extraordinary detail given in Raymond’s persona the other characters also shined with their individual oddities From his always anxious mother Shelagh his cool grandmother aptly named Winnie his best friends Twinky and Norman and well the Girl with the Chestnut Eyes Raymond never met Morrissey but he was omnipresent in all of his stories that it’s impossible not to mention him There’s a sad bit towards the end that just wrenched my heart open I felt so strongly the need to uote it“Morrissey I’m all right on my own I don’t even mind being on my own But I never wanted to be on my own That was just how it turned out And I tried to make the best out of it You helped me with that Morrissey You made it seem all right feeling lonely And it was in a way it was all right being lonely and misunderstood because I had my love of you and everything that went with that all the records and posters and videos and all the mementoes and memorabilia I had all of thatBut sometimes I find myself thinking about the future Morrissey And that’s when I’d get frightened Because it’s all right being a bit lonely when you’re only nineteen and you can wear all that loneliness like it’s cool and defiant and a bit mysterious; like it’s something you’ve chosen But when you’re not nineteen any Morrissey when you’ve ended up older and you’re still sitting there in your room on your own with a brilliant collection of Smiths and Morrissey memorabilia what then I’ve seen them Morrissey when I’ve been at conventions and all the fans have been gathered to wallow in all the wonderfulness of you and the Smiths I’ve seen them the older fans the ones who were probably fans right back at the beginningAnd do you know what occurred to me Morrissey What occurred to me is that you must despise them—fans like that Fans so devoted that they became trapped inside their devotion imprisoned by their idolatry; those who clung onto worship because they were afraid to let go; in case they discovered that outside of you Morrissey and beyond the bedrooms of their own minds they didn’t exist Which is why they are still there at all the concerts and conventions with all the right books and rare records and attitudes all the right facts dates and figures discographies bios and trivia and Morrissey lore; those who adore you for just a little too long Morrissey; those whose love is so needy that it blinds them to that look in your eyes Morrissey; that look of pained contemptAnd that’s why you have to understand Morrissey that I’ve not done all this just for myself; I’m doing it for you as well Morrissey Because I promised that I would never ever do that to you; never grow into the sort of fan whom you would have to despise So it’s for both of us Morrissey me and you”Imagine all this goodness in every page and it’s likely you can perceive a better picture of how precious this book is for me The Wrong Boy is unflinchingly one of the most moving novels you will ever read and this is all due to Willy Russell’s genius a writer I now look up to with such great respect and gratitudeHonestly I feel stuttering just like Raymond because there are simply no words enough to articulate how much of an experience reading this book have been for me—I love love love the Wrong Boy for all the right reasons ♥


  3. Jaga Jaga says:

    Dear MorrisseyI know you don't check sites for reviews of books somehow connected to you still I mean to tell you I really enjoyed this book It painfully proves how people create us and one coincidence can change one's life I also loved the praise of deliberate misery and melancholyYours sincerelyJ


  4. Tracey-Lee Tracey-Lee says:

    How did I like this book I just finished itan old rather ratty paperback copy I stumbled upon in my favourite used book store a place called Nuggets in Chilliwack BC Canada A bookstore which is very aptly named as The Wrong Boy is definitely a golden nugget of a book if ever there was such a thing The moment I finished The Wrong Boy I went to Abebooks and ordered a brand new signed by the author hardcover copy Something I've never felt the need to do before with any other book I've read but this time I just had to I admit I am a hopeless bibliophile and as this is without a doubt one of the most incredible novels I've ever read I simply had to have a new hardcover copy Having it signed; well that's the icing on the cake of perfection Willy Russell is a playwright Educating Rita Shirley Valentine are just two of his fantastic works Enough said right there really the man is an absolute genius Russell is also an author musician poet artisthe's a savant Sadly with that much talent being expressed in that many directions The Wrong Boy is the only novel Willy has published and as it took him 10 years to write it and that was 10 years ago I hold out little hope that we will see another novel from the pen of Mr Russell for a long time; if ever How sad And yes The Wrong Boy is also sad It is truly heartbreaking in places but never did I feel hopeless and while Willy did take me to the edge of what my heart could bear he never pushed me over that edge In my mind Raymond had to make it; didn't he He just had to He had too because I loved him so much Russell holds nothing back but he cares enough to pull his reader back from the pain at least long enough to allow them to breathe And lest you think this book is too sad to read wait a moment and you will LAUGH and laugh Oh how I laughed while reading this incredible book Laughing with tears rolling down my cheeks The dialogue in TWB is so rich so funny and so utterly real there were times that I felt I was a fly on the wall of Raymond's life; a bit disconcerting; considering flytrapping rules of engagement Russel always creates characters that are unforgettable I absolutely adored Gran Hell I wanted to adopt Gran I wanted Gran to be my Gran Apart from Raymond Gran was hands down the most beloved character in this story for mefollowed closely by Norman and Tink Uncle Bastard Jason was a royal arse as were his wife and kids I detested them Nobody can create characters like Willy Russell can Lovable or heinously rotten the whole cast wasis phenomenal and now that I've finished the book I miss them all I'll never forget Raymond I simply adore him It's so rare that I find a book that completely fills my heart A book that makes me laugh and cry and stay up all night despite the fact that my 4 young children will be up soon and then damn it I'll be exhausted AND a grouch for the whole darn day Hey Blame Mr Russell kids; not me It's all his fault It's so rare that I read a book that causes me to have to write a soppy gushy over the top review about it But I have too And YOU; well you have to find beg borrow or steal a copy of The Wrong Boy You have to get a copy somehow and then you have to read it for yourself It's so rare to find a book that makes me curse myself for rushing through it because it's just so darn good and I have to know what happens RIGHT NOW And how on earth will it all end And then It's over Oh NO YahNow I'm kicking myself Kicking myself for not taking my time For not being patient enough to savour every single word Come to think of it it's a bit like losing your virginity Only reading The Wrong Boy is a bit fun and way less risky Don't laugh it's true You can only read a MASTERPIECE of a STORY for the first time once Willy Mr Russell why didn't you warn me I would've taken my time NahI wouldn't havewho am I kiddingthat would've been impossible So did I like the book I adored it I loved it I loved it so much I bought myself a brand new hardcover signed addition and I'm paying to have the sucker shipped all the way from the UK to Canada Yup this one; it's a keeper This one is going into my personal library I'm not even gonna lend it outI'll get paperback copies for that Oh and when my book arrives; I'm going to run my fingertips over the real ink in Mr Russell's signature and I'm gonna feel a supernaturally close connection with that genius of a man The author who made me fall in love with a group of characters he created in a story he wrote that I adored A story I will never forget I know that Raymond and Gran; they would understand and appreciate my sentiment 100% Hey the way I see it Raymond had Morrissey; I have Mr Willy Russell Raymond and me we get it We understand completely Thank you Mr RusselFrom your most devoted fan for life Holy cow now where did that come from Did I write that Words I never thought I'D ever say to anyoneYours TrulyTracey Lee PS Ummm yescould someone please CLONE Mr Russell I could read the hell out of a seuel Actually I could read the hell out of ANYTHING this man writes


  5. KimberlyRose KimberlyRose says:

    While listing specifics of what I liked and what I didn't like about this book sure to have been a snoozer review I realized it was all the same thing all had the same overarching problem an imbalance of scenes There's your action your dialogue your think y introspection all the varying types of scenes that crafty authors order with care and thought to pacing Add in understandable doesn't need to be perfect language structure; fresh likeable real people who grow and change who experience a gamut of emotions who struggle through conflict and crisis and resolution You have yourself an affecting story This tale had too damn many victim scenes So much so that I started to think Raymond was an unreliable narrator Was he THAT surrounded by horrible closed minded judgey cruel people If not them then his mother who was hurtful despite her love for him because of her own weak identity her borderline personality I felt as if I were reading a book set in stereotyped 1950s what with the rampant ignorance and the hell of living death in social suburbia rather than the reasonably progressive and moderately human rights aware 1990sSo scenes I kept reading because when the scenes with redeemable likeable people came such as his first headmaster his gran his two young friends Twinky and Norman they were delightful There were even a few introspection scenes with Raymond alone no horridly behaving people that were touching if still sorrowful But they were all thin beams of fleeting sun in a monsterous thunderous black sky peeking out and then slammed behind another cloud moving in Despite the hopeful ending where still difficult to empathize with victimized Raymond finally finds a place for himself a place where he doesn't have to change into something he doesn't want to be normal I didn't feel as if it were a happy ending When the solution to his lack of direction introduced in such a late scene with such jarring brevity in comparison to the repeated scenes of anxiety through this long novel I didn't even care any I was absolutely bogged downed saturated by the storm of woe; instead of joy all I felt was It's about fucking time sun beam and hell if I'll trust you to stick around


  6. Margaret Bamford Margaret Bamford says:

    I found this book unusual and uite funny in places Very different from the plays he has written


  7. Sarah Sarah says:

    Read this for book club last month The writing style was interesting each chapter is a letter to Morrisey written by the protagonist in his lyric book as he makes a rather circuitous journey from Manchester to Grimsby Through these letters Raymond tells the story of his life up until now he's late teenage give or take and how its events have lead him on this journey to GrimsbyThe story telling is stream of conciousness interrupted by Raymond needing to change train coach or hitch hiking stops and interspersed with descriptions of how his journey is progressing so the past events are not retold in chronological order This makes their telling interesting as details are revealed at choice tantalising opportunitiesRussell does a great job of capturing that childhood and teenage feeling of being misunderstood by adults and how innocent childish actions can be misconstrued as something altogether sinisterThe first half or so of the book was interesting but not a page turner then suddenly the story started started to come together and I ended up finishing the last half to third of the book staying up late on two consecutive nights The conclusion was very unexepected I really didn't see it coming at all and it was a really brilliant ending to a story far touching and enjoyable than I'd expected


  8. Sophie Sophie says:

    This one came recommended to me by two colleagues I have to admit after the first two hundred pages or so I was so upset I found it hard to see why they liked it so much It's told from the perspective of a 19 year old boy named Raymond who's on his way to Grimsby where he's supposed to start a proper job On his way he's writing a diary letters to Morrissey describing his journey so far ie the story of his life And for much of that life nothing good ever seems to happenI found it horribly depressing to a point where I almost couldn't read on but in the end I'm glad I did It does have a lot of comic moments and it's really well written and the resolution is uite good It's a not uite celebration of the outsider status a book about how it's okay to be different And it's definitely one of the better of its kind if only because it has the Smiths ;


  9. Julie Bennett Julie Bennett says:

    This is a great novel It is written from the perspective of a misunderstood boy Explores adolescent thoughts the way that adults misunderstand kids Its a wonderful book extremely funnyNot for the prudish


  10. Matthew Matthew says:

    Utterly superb one of the best books I've read in some time Utterly heart wrenching hilarious and thought provoking on who really is to blame for Raymonds screwed up lifeLoved the twist in the final paragraph Cannot recommend this highly enough


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10 thoughts on “The Wrong Boy

  1. Silvanna Silvanna says:

    The Wrong Boy started out fine However it became frustratingly repetitive after the first 100 pages And that section about the Cowboy was so long winded Perhaps it was simply too Lincolnshire for me to enjoy me being a Californian girl

  2. Dardenitaaa Dardenitaaa says:

    Have you ever read a book that made you howl in laughter Have your eyes nearly popped wide open because of a clever plot twist Have you ever decided to pause halfway through the chapters because you’re in denial that the book is nearing its end Have you ever finished a story and immediately wished you could hug the fictional protagonist after the last pageI say yes to all of the above thanks to Willy Russell’s stunning first novel—The Wrong Boy—which is in every way unforgettable Written in the form of confessional letters and journal entries by 19 year old Raymond James Marks to his idol Morrissey this novel is in eual parts hilarious and heartbreaking; It’s sad sweet shocking and satisfying which basically means it easily made its way to my lists of all time favourite books ever and well—straight inside my dorky reader heartThe Wrong Boy’s plot is engaging enough to keep a reader leafing like mad through its witty and dark dialogue it is a comic coming of age odyssey of a misunderstood teenage intellectual and die hard Smiths fan his painfully erratic past and his troublesome present state Raymond the book’s hero chronicles his alternating and almost never ending dilemmas with lots of heart and humour evident in his laugh out loud narrative both in prose and poetryLike an intelligent teenage sitcom gone haywire the book is filled with crazy turn of events which unsurprisingly heaved greater havoc in Raymond’s life We get unusual ones like the Transvestite Nativity Play Scandal in his early school years to his accidental discovery of the flytrapping craze and his eventual expulsion But we also get dark disturbing themes like his having linked with the rape of a neighbourhood girl his parent’s weird love affairs and his admission to a mental facility And he oh so beautifully captured each of these life altering changes with such profound reflections and child like honesty that you can’t help but love him so The book is a screaming testament that a painful childhood is indeed the best preparation in the making of a wonderful writerAside from the extraordinary detail given in Raymond’s persona the other characters also shined with their individual oddities From his always anxious mother Shelagh his cool grandmother aptly named Winnie his best friends Twinky and Norman and well the Girl with the Chestnut Eyes Raymond never met Morrissey but he was omnipresent in all of his stories that it’s impossible not to mention him There’s a sad bit towards the end that just wrenched my heart open I felt so strongly the need to uote it“Morrissey I’m all right on my own I don’t even mind being on my own But I never wanted to be on my own That was just how it turned out And I tried to make the best out of it You helped me with that Morrissey You made it seem all right feeling lonely And it was in a way it was all right being lonely and misunderstood because I had my love of you and everything that went with that all the records and posters and videos and all the mementoes and memorabilia I had all of thatBut sometimes I find myself thinking about the future Morrissey And that’s when I’d get frightened Because it’s all right being a bit lonely when you’re only nineteen and you can wear all that loneliness like it’s cool and defiant and a bit mysterious; like it’s something you’ve chosen But when you’re not nineteen any Morrissey when you’ve ended up older and you’re still sitting there in your room on your own with a brilliant collection of Smiths and Morrissey memorabilia what then I’ve seen them Morrissey when I’ve been at conventions and all the fans have been gathered to wallow in all the wonderfulness of you and the Smiths I’ve seen them the older fans the ones who were probably fans right back at the beginningAnd do you know what occurred to me Morrissey What occurred to me is that you must despise them—fans like that Fans so devoted that they became trapped inside their devotion imprisoned by their idolatry; those who clung onto worship because they were afraid to let go; in case they discovered that outside of you Morrissey and beyond the bedrooms of their own minds they didn’t exist Which is why they are still there at all the concerts and conventions with all the right books and rare records and attitudes all the right facts dates and figures discographies bios and trivia and Morrissey lore; those who adore you for just a little too long Morrissey; those whose love is so needy that it blinds them to that look in your eyes Morrissey; that look of pained contemptAnd that’s why you have to understand Morrissey that I’ve not done all this just for myself; I’m doing it for you as well Morrissey Because I promised that I would never ever do that to you; never grow into the sort of fan whom you would have to despise So it’s for both of us Morrissey me and you”Imagine all this goodness in every page and it’s likely you can perceive a better picture of how precious this book is for me The Wrong Boy is unflinchingly one of the most moving novels you will ever read and this is all due to Willy Russell’s genius a writer I now look up to with such great respect and gratitudeHonestly I feel stuttering just like Raymond because there are simply no words enough to articulate how much of an experience reading this book have been for me—I love love love the Wrong Boy for all the right reasons ♥

  3. Jaga Jaga says:

    Dear MorrisseyI know you don't check sites for reviews of books somehow connected to you still I mean to tell you I really enjoyed this book It painfully proves how people create us and one coincidence can change one's life I also loved the praise of deliberate misery and melancholyYours sincerelyJ

  4. Tracey-Lee Tracey-Lee says:

    How did I like this book I just finished itan old rather ratty paperback copy I stumbled upon in my favourite used book store a place called Nuggets in Chilliwack BC Canada A bookstore which is very aptly named as The Wrong Boy is definitely a golden nugget of a book if ever there was such a thing The moment I finished The Wrong Boy I went to Abebooks and ordered a brand new signed by the author hardcover copy Something I've never felt the need to do before with any other book I've read but this time I just had to I admit I am a hopeless bibliophile and as this is without a doubt one of the most incredible novels I've ever read I simply had to have a new hardcover copy Having it signed; well that's the icing on the cake of perfection Willy Russell is a playwright Educating Rita Shirley Valentine are just two of his fantastic works Enough said right there really the man is an absolute genius Russell is also an author musician poet artisthe's a savant Sadly with that much talent being expressed in that many directions The Wrong Boy is the only novel Willy has published and as it took him 10 years to write it and that was 10 years ago I hold out little hope that we will see another novel from the pen of Mr Russell for a long time; if ever How sad And yes The Wrong Boy is also sad It is truly heartbreaking in places but never did I feel hopeless and while Willy did take me to the edge of what my heart could bear he never pushed me over that edge In my mind Raymond had to make it; didn't he He just had to He had too because I loved him so much Russell holds nothing back but he cares enough to pull his reader back from the pain at least long enough to allow them to breathe And lest you think this book is too sad to read wait a moment and you will LAUGH and laugh Oh how I laughed while reading this incredible book Laughing with tears rolling down my cheeks The dialogue in TWB is so rich so funny and so utterly real there were times that I felt I was a fly on the wall of Raymond's life; a bit disconcerting; considering flytrapping rules of engagement Russel always creates characters that are unforgettable I absolutely adored Gran Hell I wanted to adopt Gran I wanted Gran to be my Gran Apart from Raymond Gran was hands down the most beloved character in this story for mefollowed closely by Norman and Tink Uncle Bastard Jason was a royal arse as were his wife and kids I detested them Nobody can create characters like Willy Russell can Lovable or heinously rotten the whole cast wasis phenomenal and now that I've finished the book I miss them all I'll never forget Raymond I simply adore him It's so rare that I find a book that completely fills my heart A book that makes me laugh and cry and stay up all night despite the fact that my 4 young children will be up soon and then damn it I'll be exhausted AND a grouch for the whole darn day Hey Blame Mr Russell kids; not me It's all his fault It's so rare that I read a book that causes me to have to write a soppy gushy over the top review about it But I have too And YOU; well you have to find beg borrow or steal a copy of The Wrong Boy You have to get a copy somehow and then you have to read it for yourself It's so rare to find a book that makes me curse myself for rushing through it because it's just so darn good and I have to know what happens RIGHT NOW And how on earth will it all end And then It's over Oh NO YahNow I'm kicking myself Kicking myself for not taking my time For not being patient enough to savour every single word Come to think of it it's a bit like losing your virginity Only reading The Wrong Boy is a bit fun and way less risky Don't laugh it's true You can only read a MASTERPIECE of a STORY for the first time once Willy Mr Russell why didn't you warn me I would've taken my time NahI wouldn't havewho am I kiddingthat would've been impossible So did I like the book I adored it I loved it I loved it so much I bought myself a brand new hardcover signed addition and I'm paying to have the sucker shipped all the way from the UK to Canada Yup this one; it's a keeper This one is going into my personal library I'm not even gonna lend it outI'll get paperback copies for that Oh and when my book arrives; I'm going to run my fingertips over the real ink in Mr Russell's signature and I'm gonna feel a supernaturally close connection with that genius of a man The author who made me fall in love with a group of characters he created in a story he wrote that I adored A story I will never forget I know that Raymond and Gran; they would understand and appreciate my sentiment 100% Hey the way I see it Raymond had Morrissey; I have Mr Willy Russell Raymond and me we get it We understand completely Thank you Mr RusselFrom your most devoted fan for life Holy cow now where did that come from Did I write that Words I never thought I'D ever say to anyoneYours TrulyTracey Lee PS Ummm yescould someone please CLONE Mr Russell I could read the hell out of a seuel Actually I could read the hell out of ANYTHING this man writes

  5. KimberlyRose KimberlyRose says:

    While listing specifics of what I liked and what I didn't like about this book sure to have been a snoozer review I realized it was all the same thing all had the same overarching problem an imbalance of scenes There's your action your dialogue your think y introspection all the varying types of scenes that crafty authors order with care and thought to pacing Add in understandable doesn't need to be perfect language structure; fresh likeable real people who grow and change who experience a gamut of emotions who struggle through conflict and crisis and resolution You have yourself an affecting story This tale had too damn many victim scenes So much so that I started to think Raymond was an unreliable narrator Was he THAT surrounded by horrible closed minded judgey cruel people If not them then his mother who was hurtful despite her love for him because of her own weak identity her borderline personality I felt as if I were reading a book set in stereotyped 1950s what with the rampant ignorance and the hell of living death in social suburbia rather than the reasonably progressive and moderately human rights aware 1990sSo scenes I kept reading because when the scenes with redeemable likeable people came such as his first headmaster his gran his two young friends Twinky and Norman they were delightful There were even a few introspection scenes with Raymond alone no horridly behaving people that were touching if still sorrowful But they were all thin beams of fleeting sun in a monsterous thunderous black sky peeking out and then slammed behind another cloud moving in Despite the hopeful ending where still difficult to empathize with victimized Raymond finally finds a place for himself a place where he doesn't have to change into something he doesn't want to be normal I didn't feel as if it were a happy ending When the solution to his lack of direction introduced in such a late scene with such jarring brevity in comparison to the repeated scenes of anxiety through this long novel I didn't even care any I was absolutely bogged downed saturated by the storm of woe; instead of joy all I felt was It's about fucking time sun beam and hell if I'll trust you to stick around

  6. Margaret Bamford Margaret Bamford says:

    I found this book unusual and uite funny in places Very different from the plays he has written

  7. Sarah Sarah says:

    Read this for book club last month The writing style was interesting each chapter is a letter to Morrisey written by the protagonist in his lyric book as he makes a rather circuitous journey from Manchester to Grimsby Through these letters Raymond tells the story of his life up until now he's late teenage give or take and how its events have lead him on this journey to GrimsbyThe story telling is stream of conciousness interrupted by Raymond needing to change train coach or hitch hiking stops and interspersed with descriptions of how his journey is progressing so the past events are not retold in chronological order This makes their telling interesting as details are revealed at choice tantalising opportunitiesRussell does a great job of capturing that childhood and teenage feeling of being misunderstood by adults and how innocent childish actions can be misconstrued as something altogether sinisterThe first half or so of the book was interesting but not a page turner then suddenly the story started started to come together and I ended up finishing the last half to third of the book staying up late on two consecutive nights The conclusion was very unexepected I really didn't see it coming at all and it was a really brilliant ending to a story far touching and enjoyable than I'd expected

  8. Sophie Sophie says:

    This one came recommended to me by two colleagues I have to admit after the first two hundred pages or so I was so upset I found it hard to see why they liked it so much It's told from the perspective of a 19 year old boy named Raymond who's on his way to Grimsby where he's supposed to start a proper job On his way he's writing a diary letters to Morrissey describing his journey so far ie the story of his life And for much of that life nothing good ever seems to happenI found it horribly depressing to a point where I almost couldn't read on but in the end I'm glad I did It does have a lot of comic moments and it's really well written and the resolution is uite good It's a not uite celebration of the outsider status a book about how it's okay to be different And it's definitely one of the better of its kind if only because it has the Smiths ;

  9. Julie Bennett Julie Bennett says:

    This is a great novel It is written from the perspective of a misunderstood boy Explores adolescent thoughts the way that adults misunderstand kids Its a wonderful book extremely funnyNot for the prudish

  10. Matthew Matthew says:

    Utterly superb one of the best books I've read in some time Utterly heart wrenching hilarious and thought provoking on who really is to blame for Raymonds screwed up lifeLoved the twist in the final paragraph Cannot recommend this highly enough

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