Under Red Skies: Three Generations of Life, Loss, and Hope

Under Red Skies: Three Generations of Life, Loss, and Hope


Under Red Skies: Three Generations of Life, Loss, and Hope in China [Epub] ❤ Under Red Skies: Three Generations of Life, Loss, and Hope in China By Karoline Kan – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Chinese journalist at the NYT in Beijing Karoline Kan's UNDER RED SKIES the story of her millennial generation in the new China weaving her own story with the story of four others showing outsiders th Chinese journalist at the Skies: Three eBook ↠ NYT in Beijing Karoline Kan's UNDER RED SKIES the story of her millennial generation in the new China weaving her own story with the story of four others showing outsiders the current culture and politics of her country as she discovers it for herself—for better or worse to Krishan Trotman at Hachette books in a nice deal for publication in spring by Kelly Falconer at Under Red PDF \ Asia Literary Agency world English.

  • Under Red Skies: Three Generations of Life, Loss, and Hope in China
  • Karoline Kan
  • 11 August 2015

10 thoughts on “Under Red Skies: Three Generations of Life, Loss, and Hope in China

  1. Marks54 Marks54 says:

    This is a memoir of sorts from a young woman who is a Chinese millenial and who was born at the time of the Tienanmen Suare massacre or the “June 4th event” as it is referred to in China and in the book Ms Kan recounts her childhood move from a village to a town and her eventual move to Beijing to attend university This is an account of the transition from Communist China to the new China under Deng's policy of opening up of markets and encouraging capitalism and economic prosperity within the context of Communist Party leadership I have never liked generational narratives much and know firsthand the enormous variety that is encompassed within a given range of birth dates but this sort of story is most informative and valuable for readers who lack much knowledge of any sort regarding the individuals in the story or of a different culture generally That is a major problem for Americans and many westerners I suspect in considering the experiences and perspectives of the tens of thousands of young university educated Chinese that one encounters freuently these days in university settings and technological and professional service work settings A brewing tradetariff war will only make the problems of ignorance worse It is hard enough for many Americans to fathom the changes in American society since the 1970s and 1980s and I feel at a continuing disadvantage in trying to understand emergent China and the perspectives of young ChineseMs Kan's account is easy to follow straightforward and fairly honest She is a skillful writer who had some experience working as a researcher for The NY Times andother Western outlets She raises lots of critical issues including urbanization evolving gender identities dating social media and changes in family ties across three generations as economic and political change occurs She addresses these issues in a direct and informative manner The style at times comes across to me as a bit too stylized and even manufactured as if she was trying to speak for than herself and fit into emerging standards for acceptable phrases and linguistic conventions She can be surer off her own voice here she has much to offerIt is a timely and worthwhile read and is valuable both for its information content as well as it’s sharp and compelling story

  2. Fiona Fiona says:

    As a member of the millennial generation in China Karoline Kan has witnessed the rapid technological progress and booming commercialisation of Beijing while being painfully aware of the very different and difficult lives her parents and grandparents have had Kan was born in a farming village in 1989 the year of the protests in Tiananmen Suare The one child policy was strictly policed by the authorities and her mother had to hide this second pregnancy from them to avoid an enforced abortion which could happen as late as 7 months or into the pregnancy Kan’s mother was a very self sufficient woman and this amongst other things caused friction with her in laws There was no freedom of movement at this time particularly if you were a villager working the land You couldn’t move to a town unless you found a job first and there were few available Kan’s mother managed to get a job in a town however and moved herself and her children there Her in laws felt disrespected as women were still expected to be subservient to their husbands and she had taken this initiative herself Had things gone wrong she couldn’t have returned to her own family because once a daughter has married they are considered ‘spilled water’ and can never returnKan was academically bright and got a place in a high school that prepared pupils to pass the final national two day exam The residential school had 5000 pupils who had one weekend off studying every month Romance was not allowed and pupils were punished if caught As an aside Kan tells us that they had no sex education Chinese women are still expected to be virgins when they marry and so birth control is only available then She tells us that there are 10 million abortions every year nearly half to women under 25 years of age I find that an unimaginable number On leaving high school Kan went to university and eventually achieved her dream of becoming a writer at one time working for the NY Times as a “researcher” Chinese nationals are not allowed to be employed as journalists with foreign newspapers or agenciesAlthough many Chinese are financially successful nowadays there is still a huge gap between life in the cities and village life Kan talks about the SARS outbreak in 2003 She says it was impossible to get advice on how to avoid it or how to treat it as the Chinese government chose to keep uiet about it Nevertheless it was widely known that it had spread through rural populations eating wild animals Villagers had no access to ualified medical practitioners no health insurance and no ability to pay for a private consultation They relied on one of their own people usually a farmer being self taught and treating the community I listened to an abridged version on BBC radio The narrator speaks very clear English but her inflections in sentences are constantly misplaced and I found that a little annoying The content of the book reminds me of Do Not Say We Have Nothing and of the stories we were told during a recent visit to China Our tour guides were all ages with Karoline Kan and talked openly about their parents and grandparents’ lives and the changes they have seen in their own lives provided we didn’t ask them uestions in public areas This is a very interesting memoir well worth listening to or reading

  3. Laura Laura says:

    This is an exceptional book that captivated me from the first page on With powerful and moving words the author explains in detail the actions and motives of the government and their reception by the people Kan creates a story for deeper understanding of the Chinese culture and presents her own origins personal and authentic family history with changes in generation and traditions connected to the well explained history of China She combines all this information in a wonderful narrative merging the perspective of a growing up Chaouin with the knowledge of a grown up woman The historical background information is always on point never too muchThe book is colourful thanks to the description of rural and urban China the characters are vivid and you can feel the author's love for her country and origins as well as the disappointed in certain aspects of the political systemBeing the same age I loved to observe the difference in growing up in Europe and not China and this book helped me a lot in understanding why Chinese people are as they are Very insightful and enjoyable read

  4. Horace Derwent Horace Derwent says:

    the road was Fengyang Road Shanghai and the plastic bag in the girl's hand was KFC i think the cover photo was shot within 1015 years before

  5. Laura Laura says:

    From BBC Radio 4Karoline Kan was born in 1989 the year of the Tiananmen Suare massacre Her generation has always been caught between China’s authoritarian politics and its hyper modern technology and economic boomIn her uest to understand the shifting sands of global connected China Karoline turns to her family who have survived Maoism and its legacy by breaking with tradition Navigating a society beset by poverty and often violent political unrest the Kans swapped rural villages for crowded city streets in search of a better way of lifeNow a journalist Karoline recounts gripping tales of her grandmother who struggled to help her family through the Great Famine; of her mother who defied the One Child Policy by giving birth to Karoline and of her cousin a factory worker scraping by on less than £1 per hour An ambitious millennial pursuing her career and personal life in a time of dizzyingly rapid social change Karoline discovers her own story’s roots in the China of previous generationsKaroline Kan is a former New York Times reporter who writes about millennial life and politics in China Currently an editor at China Dialogue she lives in BeijingAbridged by Polly ColesRead by Shin Fei ChenProduced by Clive BrillPhotograph of Karoline Kan by Kelly DawsonA Brill production for BBC Radio 4 httpswwwbbccouksoundsplaym00

  6. 6 6 says:

    I want to start the review by saying that the author is pretty much full of herself Given her age not even thirty and her background I rated this memoir five stars because of that not in spite of it At the ripe age of 28 I believe we were all full of ourselves She is honest and tells a compelling story that I can't wait to read page after page I don't ask from a memoir I was born and raised in Beijing China I am about 15 years older than the author Whatever she described I lived through however from a privileged perspective I am a second child but born before the only child era I had a City Huko I grew up in suburban Beijing and never worried about money or statusI went to one of the best universities in Beijing without torturous study it's easier to get into better universities if you take the exam in Beijing or other major citiesBecause of this I was an obedient child no need to rebel followed everything my parents and whatever authorities told me and never uestioned the reasoning of our precious government Looking back there were a lot of things that I did makes me cringe now One of them is how oblivious I was of my privilege I couldn't understand why someone would want to break the law and have than one child I couldn't understand why those who were born in the rural area want to migrate to the city and create a messy environment I couldn't understand why people protest this and protest that I thought we lived in the best country in the world and we should all be thankful for the wonderful leadershipThis book helped me explain a lot of my childhood and youth year to myself and my children I am thankful that there is someone who can tell this era so straightforward and in such an interesting way Now let's get to my claim that the author is full of herself She didn't say it out loud But throughout the book I feel like she is trying to convey the idea that she is better than most of the Chinese people One example would be her reaction to Tiananmen Suare As someone who lived through it and was brainwashed day in and day out I can assure you that no one or I should say almost no one can just look at some online pictures and turned against their government We were warned about the twisted way western world look at us and how dangerous it is to believe their propaganda I believe one of the reviewers here does consider this whole book western propaganda We were told the whole event is NECESSARY for the progress And we were brought up with the imprinted idea that sacrifice is always a must There are one thousand compelling stories the government fed us for everyone picture the western media portrayed that day I really don't believe by a look at some pictures she can be persuaded that our government did something wrong More convincing is how she ended this part of the book by describing how she didn't do anything at the end and how she is scared that whatever she does would affect her future Another example is her relationship with men She talked about this boss of hers Claire with disgust for lack of a better word Claire only dated foreigners and look down on Chinese even though she is a Chinese herself The author was uite offended by this However the only two real relationships she herself has have been both with white men According to her description the first guy impressed her because he held the door open for her and no Chinese men would ever do that not true I was uite annoyed by this part of the book at first But the I thought about it the I feel this is a very authentic view of how Chinese feel about and behave around foreigners We were taught to hate foreigners and brought up with the belief that we should be dignified while dealing with them But our policy our media and even our leaders all show admiration to foreigners and in occassions it does make us feel like the foreigners are better than us This confliction is imprinted in most of us Examples like these filled this book I believe her age her background and also her eagerness to please American readers contribute to this But as I said before it doesn't bother me It offers a better portrait of how Chinese view ourselves and foreigners It's authentic Sad but authentic

  7. James James says:

    A wonderfully written enlightening and freuently poignant coming of age story set in modern China Karoline Kan’s writing rips along through her childhood and adolescence but the story never feels rushed painting a portrait of village life in a rapidly changing country and how disjointed and rudderless rapid development can leave you feeling even when it’s presenting never before seen opportunities and new freedoms Disclosure I read a review copy provided by the publisher and also worked briefly alongside Karoline at That’s Magazines

  8. Kuang Ting Kuang Ting says:

    I am a reader from Taiwan and find this book particularly insightful I am almost the same age as the author Therefore I think her descriptions are very useful for readers especially Western readers to understand contemporary China China has undergone one of the most rapid transformation in human's history during the last few decades The cultural economic political and almost everything change so fast that full comprehension is sometimes not possible Taiwan is also part of the intricate Chinese history which is still ongoing If you know the 'interesting' relationship between China and Taiwan you may think Taiwanese understand China than other countries However it's actually not the case Many people I know have little understanding about China as well It's sad to see how people are manipulated by political parties here Let's turn the attention back to this book As someone also from Chinese cultural community I learn much new knowledge from the book In the past few years I have read books by prominent China observers such as Peter Hessler Evan Osnos Ian Johnson Michael Meyer and many They all give me great insights on 21st century China Nonetheless they are foreigners after all It's a bit like comparisons between first or second hand experiences A Chinese tells a Chinese story Sounds down to earth right? That's why I highly recommend the book to everyone interested in China Author Karoline is a nice story teller She intimately weaves personal experience and national memories together Her prose is beautiful and clear Though I think her writing cater to Western readers to some extent her stories are representative of common people in today's China Forget about the corrupt officials and lavishly spoiled little emperors The news from international mainstream media outlets only make China's image obscure I mean yes Huawei President Xi Jack Ma they are all integral parts of China but understanding a country from the bottom up is essential At least it's my way to learn about other countries Say if I learn about the USA based solely on what Trump tweeted I would think how arrogant this nation is On contrary if I learn about the USA by reading 'Travels with Charley' by Steinbeck or 'On the Road' by Jack Kerouac I would say they greatly complement what the macro descriptions lack The US is not a monotonous country There are great varieties from state to state What happened in the 1960s? What is the so called Beat Generation? Historical events ripple through generations What happened in the past shapes the status uo Personally I hope China and the US could have mutual understanding As the two great powers misunderstanding seems to dominate current interactions 'Under red Skies' fills the gap The story line lasts over three generations It begins approximately at the time when the Communist Party took over China in 1949 Karoline's grandparents were the most tragic generation that lived through one of the most tumultuous times in modern China They encountered events like The Cultural Revolution and The Great Famine etc The ordeal was so strong that it made Chinese people felt insecure all the time Even after China's opening door to the world in 1978 this kind of mind set persists to this day The economic reforms paved the way for China's meteoric ascent to become an economic powerhouse However institutional deficiency still made common people's life not so easy Karoline's parents' generation worked hard to give their children better lives It's Karoline's generation that enjoys some privileges and freedoms Finally young people may pursue and realize their dreams It's been a long journey and many challenges wait ahead for Chinese millennials Karoline's family and personal stories are inspiring and encouraging She is a brave person In summary this book is a great read for everyone interested in China Personally it makes me understand my 'counterparts' better Apart from the Chinese elements readers could easily take it as a memoir of an aspiring young lady Her growth stories are truly immersive Wish her best lucks hereafter Rating 5 stars

  9. Rachel Rachel says:

    Really interesting and well written memoir of a Chinese millennial Covers so many interesting topics I love the way that she shares her own story as well as her parents and grandparents She is so reflective and honest of her own journey coming to age in this country and learning the strengths and weaknesses found in its traditions and policies

  10. Mohamed Tahar Hamada Mohamed Tahar Hamada says:

    ''People fear what they don't understand''This book came exactly in a time where we hearing a lot about china and where myself have been in a kind of a uest to know about the ''middle earth country'' that always seems like we know lot and nothing about it in the same time like a dilemmaMainly because the little amount of reliable informations and facts from inside from a side and the rare opening up of chinese people around their opinions publiclyThis book takes you through a journey and the book title represent it well through Life and Loss and Hope that a simple chinese girl and in the same time a chinese family can have and through this ''biography'' of life you can learn a lot about politicstraditionsculture of a region soo opaue and mysterious to the westThis book is totally recommanded to know about livespoliticsideologies or just to enjoy a travel to china without moving there

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10 thoughts on “Under Red Skies: Three Generations of Life, Loss, and Hope in China

  1. Marks54 Marks54 says:

    This is a memoir of sorts from a young woman who is a Chinese millenial and who was born at the time of the Tienanmen Suare massacre or the “June 4th event” as it is referred to in China and in the book Ms Kan recounts her childhood move from a village to a town and her eventual move to Beijing to attend university This is an account of the transition from Communist China to the new China under Deng's policy of opening up of markets and encouraging capitalism and economic prosperity within the context of Communist Party leadership I have never liked generational narratives much and know firsthand the enormous variety that is encompassed within a given range of birth dates but this sort of story is most informative and valuable for readers who lack much knowledge of any sort regarding the individuals in the story or of a different culture generally That is a major problem for Americans and many westerners I suspect in considering the experiences and perspectives of the tens of thousands of young university educated Chinese that one encounters freuently these days in university settings and technological and professional service work settings A brewing tradetariff war will only make the problems of ignorance worse It is hard enough for many Americans to fathom the changes in American society since the 1970s and 1980s and I feel at a continuing disadvantage in trying to understand emergent China and the perspectives of young ChineseMs Kan's account is easy to follow straightforward and fairly honest She is a skillful writer who had some experience working as a researcher for The NY Times andother Western outlets She raises lots of critical issues including urbanization evolving gender identities dating social media and changes in family ties across three generations as economic and political change occurs She addresses these issues in a direct and informative manner The style at times comes across to me as a bit too stylized and even manufactured as if she was trying to speak for than herself and fit into emerging standards for acceptable phrases and linguistic conventions She can be surer off her own voice here she has much to offerIt is a timely and worthwhile read and is valuable both for its information content as well as it’s sharp and compelling story

  2. Fiona Fiona says:

    As a member of the millennial generation in China Karoline Kan has witnessed the rapid technological progress and booming commercialisation of Beijing while being painfully aware of the very different and difficult lives her parents and grandparents have had Kan was born in a farming village in 1989 the year of the protests in Tiananmen Suare The one child policy was strictly policed by the authorities and her mother had to hide this second pregnancy from them to avoid an enforced abortion which could happen as late as 7 months or into the pregnancy Kan’s mother was a very self sufficient woman and this amongst other things caused friction with her in laws There was no freedom of movement at this time particularly if you were a villager working the land You couldn’t move to a town unless you found a job first and there were few available Kan’s mother managed to get a job in a town however and moved herself and her children there Her in laws felt disrespected as women were still expected to be subservient to their husbands and she had taken this initiative herself Had things gone wrong she couldn’t have returned to her own family because once a daughter has married they are considered ‘spilled water’ and can never returnKan was academically bright and got a place in a high school that prepared pupils to pass the final national two day exam The residential school had 5000 pupils who had one weekend off studying every month Romance was not allowed and pupils were punished if caught As an aside Kan tells us that they had no sex education Chinese women are still expected to be virgins when they marry and so birth control is only available then She tells us that there are 10 million abortions every year nearly half to women under 25 years of age I find that an unimaginable number On leaving high school Kan went to university and eventually achieved her dream of becoming a writer at one time working for the NY Times as a “researcher” Chinese nationals are not allowed to be employed as journalists with foreign newspapers or agenciesAlthough many Chinese are financially successful nowadays there is still a huge gap between life in the cities and village life Kan talks about the SARS outbreak in 2003 She says it was impossible to get advice on how to avoid it or how to treat it as the Chinese government chose to keep uiet about it Nevertheless it was widely known that it had spread through rural populations eating wild animals Villagers had no access to ualified medical practitioners no health insurance and no ability to pay for a private consultation They relied on one of their own people usually a farmer being self taught and treating the community I listened to an abridged version on BBC radio The narrator speaks very clear English but her inflections in sentences are constantly misplaced and I found that a little annoying The content of the book reminds me of Do Not Say We Have Nothing and of the stories we were told during a recent visit to China Our tour guides were all ages with Karoline Kan and talked openly about their parents and grandparents’ lives and the changes they have seen in their own lives provided we didn’t ask them uestions in public areas This is a very interesting memoir well worth listening to or reading

  3. Laura Laura says:

    This is an exceptional book that captivated me from the first page on With powerful and moving words the author explains in detail the actions and motives of the government and their reception by the people Kan creates a story for deeper understanding of the Chinese culture and presents her own origins personal and authentic family history with changes in generation and traditions connected to the well explained history of China She combines all this information in a wonderful narrative merging the perspective of a growing up Chaouin with the knowledge of a grown up woman The historical background information is always on point never too muchThe book is colourful thanks to the description of rural and urban China the characters are vivid and you can feel the author's love for her country and origins as well as the disappointed in certain aspects of the political systemBeing the same age I loved to observe the difference in growing up in Europe and not China and this book helped me a lot in understanding why Chinese people are as they are Very insightful and enjoyable read

  4. Horace Derwent Horace Derwent says:

    the road was Fengyang Road Shanghai and the plastic bag in the girl's hand was KFC i think the cover photo was shot within 1015 years before

  5. Laura Laura says:

    From BBC Radio 4Karoline Kan was born in 1989 the year of the Tiananmen Suare massacre Her generation has always been caught between China’s authoritarian politics and its hyper modern technology and economic boomIn her uest to understand the shifting sands of global connected China Karoline turns to her family who have survived Maoism and its legacy by breaking with tradition Navigating a society beset by poverty and often violent political unrest the Kans swapped rural villages for crowded city streets in search of a better way of lifeNow a journalist Karoline recounts gripping tales of her grandmother who struggled to help her family through the Great Famine; of her mother who defied the One Child Policy by giving birth to Karoline and of her cousin a factory worker scraping by on less than £1 per hour An ambitious millennial pursuing her career and personal life in a time of dizzyingly rapid social change Karoline discovers her own story’s roots in the China of previous generationsKaroline Kan is a former New York Times reporter who writes about millennial life and politics in China Currently an editor at China Dialogue she lives in BeijingAbridged by Polly ColesRead by Shin Fei ChenProduced by Clive BrillPhotograph of Karoline Kan by Kelly DawsonA Brill production for BBC Radio 4 httpswwwbbccouksoundsplaym00

  6. 6 6 says:

    I want to start the review by saying that the author is pretty much full of herself Given her age not even thirty and her background I rated this memoir five stars because of that not in spite of it At the ripe age of 28 I believe we were all full of ourselves She is honest and tells a compelling story that I can't wait to read page after page I don't ask from a memoir I was born and raised in Beijing China I am about 15 years older than the author Whatever she described I lived through however from a privileged perspective I am a second child but born before the only child era I had a City Huko I grew up in suburban Beijing and never worried about money or statusI went to one of the best universities in Beijing without torturous study it's easier to get into better universities if you take the exam in Beijing or other major citiesBecause of this I was an obedient child no need to rebel followed everything my parents and whatever authorities told me and never uestioned the reasoning of our precious government Looking back there were a lot of things that I did makes me cringe now One of them is how oblivious I was of my privilege I couldn't understand why someone would want to break the law and have than one child I couldn't understand why those who were born in the rural area want to migrate to the city and create a messy environment I couldn't understand why people protest this and protest that I thought we lived in the best country in the world and we should all be thankful for the wonderful leadershipThis book helped me explain a lot of my childhood and youth year to myself and my children I am thankful that there is someone who can tell this era so straightforward and in such an interesting way Now let's get to my claim that the author is full of herself She didn't say it out loud But throughout the book I feel like she is trying to convey the idea that she is better than most of the Chinese people One example would be her reaction to Tiananmen Suare As someone who lived through it and was brainwashed day in and day out I can assure you that no one or I should say almost no one can just look at some online pictures and turned against their government We were warned about the twisted way western world look at us and how dangerous it is to believe their propaganda I believe one of the reviewers here does consider this whole book western propaganda We were told the whole event is NECESSARY for the progress And we were brought up with the imprinted idea that sacrifice is always a must There are one thousand compelling stories the government fed us for everyone picture the western media portrayed that day I really don't believe by a look at some pictures she can be persuaded that our government did something wrong More convincing is how she ended this part of the book by describing how she didn't do anything at the end and how she is scared that whatever she does would affect her future Another example is her relationship with men She talked about this boss of hers Claire with disgust for lack of a better word Claire only dated foreigners and look down on Chinese even though she is a Chinese herself The author was uite offended by this However the only two real relationships she herself has have been both with white men According to her description the first guy impressed her because he held the door open for her and no Chinese men would ever do that not true I was uite annoyed by this part of the book at first But the I thought about it the I feel this is a very authentic view of how Chinese feel about and behave around foreigners We were taught to hate foreigners and brought up with the belief that we should be dignified while dealing with them But our policy our media and even our leaders all show admiration to foreigners and in occassions it does make us feel like the foreigners are better than us This confliction is imprinted in most of us Examples like these filled this book I believe her age her background and also her eagerness to please American readers contribute to this But as I said before it doesn't bother me It offers a better portrait of how Chinese view ourselves and foreigners It's authentic Sad but authentic

  7. James James says:

    A wonderfully written enlightening and freuently poignant coming of age story set in modern China Karoline Kan’s writing rips along through her childhood and adolescence but the story never feels rushed painting a portrait of village life in a rapidly changing country and how disjointed and rudderless rapid development can leave you feeling even when it’s presenting never before seen opportunities and new freedoms Disclosure I read a review copy provided by the publisher and also worked briefly alongside Karoline at That’s Magazines

  8. Kuang Ting Kuang Ting says:

    I am a reader from Taiwan and find this book particularly insightful I am almost the same age as the author Therefore I think her descriptions are very useful for readers especially Western readers to understand contemporary China China has undergone one of the most rapid transformation in human's history during the last few decades The cultural economic political and almost everything change so fast that full comprehension is sometimes not possible Taiwan is also part of the intricate Chinese history which is still ongoing If you know the 'interesting' relationship between China and Taiwan you may think Taiwanese understand China than other countries However it's actually not the case Many people I know have little understanding about China as well It's sad to see how people are manipulated by political parties here Let's turn the attention back to this book As someone also from Chinese cultural community I learn much new knowledge from the book In the past few years I have read books by prominent China observers such as Peter Hessler Evan Osnos Ian Johnson Michael Meyer and many They all give me great insights on 21st century China Nonetheless they are foreigners after all It's a bit like comparisons between first or second hand experiences A Chinese tells a Chinese story Sounds down to earth right? That's why I highly recommend the book to everyone interested in China Author Karoline is a nice story teller She intimately weaves personal experience and national memories together Her prose is beautiful and clear Though I think her writing cater to Western readers to some extent her stories are representative of common people in today's China Forget about the corrupt officials and lavishly spoiled little emperors The news from international mainstream media outlets only make China's image obscure I mean yes Huawei President Xi Jack Ma they are all integral parts of China but understanding a country from the bottom up is essential At least it's my way to learn about other countries Say if I learn about the USA based solely on what Trump tweeted I would think how arrogant this nation is On contrary if I learn about the USA by reading 'Travels with Charley' by Steinbeck or 'On the Road' by Jack Kerouac I would say they greatly complement what the macro descriptions lack The US is not a monotonous country There are great varieties from state to state What happened in the 1960s? What is the so called Beat Generation? Historical events ripple through generations What happened in the past shapes the status uo Personally I hope China and the US could have mutual understanding As the two great powers misunderstanding seems to dominate current interactions 'Under red Skies' fills the gap The story line lasts over three generations It begins approximately at the time when the Communist Party took over China in 1949 Karoline's grandparents were the most tragic generation that lived through one of the most tumultuous times in modern China They encountered events like The Cultural Revolution and The Great Famine etc The ordeal was so strong that it made Chinese people felt insecure all the time Even after China's opening door to the world in 1978 this kind of mind set persists to this day The economic reforms paved the way for China's meteoric ascent to become an economic powerhouse However institutional deficiency still made common people's life not so easy Karoline's parents' generation worked hard to give their children better lives It's Karoline's generation that enjoys some privileges and freedoms Finally young people may pursue and realize their dreams It's been a long journey and many challenges wait ahead for Chinese millennials Karoline's family and personal stories are inspiring and encouraging She is a brave person In summary this book is a great read for everyone interested in China Personally it makes me understand my 'counterparts' better Apart from the Chinese elements readers could easily take it as a memoir of an aspiring young lady Her growth stories are truly immersive Wish her best lucks hereafter Rating 5 stars

  9. Rachel Rachel says:

    Really interesting and well written memoir of a Chinese millennial Covers so many interesting topics I love the way that she shares her own story as well as her parents and grandparents She is so reflective and honest of her own journey coming to age in this country and learning the strengths and weaknesses found in its traditions and policies

  10. Mohamed Tahar Hamada Mohamed Tahar Hamada says:

    ''People fear what they don't understand''This book came exactly in a time where we hearing a lot about china and where myself have been in a kind of a uest to know about the ''middle earth country'' that always seems like we know lot and nothing about it in the same time like a dilemmaMainly because the little amount of reliable informations and facts from inside from a side and the rare opening up of chinese people around their opinions publiclyThis book takes you through a journey and the book title represent it well through Life and Loss and Hope that a simple chinese girl and in the same time a chinese family can have and through this ''biography'' of life you can learn a lot about politicstraditionsculture of a region soo opaue and mysterious to the westThis book is totally recommanded to know about livespoliticsideologies or just to enjoy a travel to china without moving there

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *