Kindle Edition ï Kanthapura PDF/EPUB Þ

Kindle Edition ï Kanthapura PDF/EPUB Þ


Kanthapura ❮BOOKS❯ ✮ Kanthapura Author Raja Rao – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Regarded as the first major Indian novel in English Kanthapura is the story of how Gandhi’s struggle for Independence came to a casteist south Indian village Young Moorthy back from the city brimmin Regarded as the first major Indian novel in English Kanthapura is the story of how Gandhi’s struggle for Independence came to a casteist south Indian village Young Moorthy back from the city brimming with new ideas seeks to cut across ancient barriers and unite the villagers in non violent action The story emerges through the eyes of a delightful old woman who comments on the villagers’ actions with sharp eyed wisdom evoking the spirit of India’s traditional folk epics.


10 thoughts on “Kanthapura

  1. Nathan "N.R." Gaddis Nathan "N.R." Gaddis says:

    Mahatma Gandhi ki jaiMala warned me that I’d be scratching my head And it was lovely But this ND editions provided sixty pages of helpful notes which reduced somewhat that head scratching But not so much that there was no pleasure leftThe story is the common story of a rural village undergoing political change But I’m not immediately certain that this kind of story is so common; in our current literary climate which so freuently features alienated individuals as protagonists Here the community is the protagonist And there are many individuals within this community They become one in order to fight a violent colonial occupation The novel is violent Alone to experience how violent the practice of non violence becomes the violence which practitioners of non violence must undergo suffer is reason enough to read this oneSince we are in the realm of Gandhi here one is inevitably tempted to respond to the freuent uninformed common wisdom that Pacifism and non violence and non resistance may be good ideas but they don’t work And violence does? And further today when everyone in the know knows that religion is the cause of violence we again have to wonder about the most violent regimes of the twentieth century the fact that they were all secular and that one of them survives into the twenty first century still ruling the world and compare with Gandhi’s own religiously grounded non violent organization It takes an army to resist violence And it takes willful ignorance of the evidence to declare both the non functioning of non violence and religion as the source of violence Just look around folks Prose? Our narrator a village wise woman cultural repository who indeed knows the village of Kanthapura inside and out backwards and forwards is a master of the run on sentence the breathlessness of it and hers should be filed along with that set of aesthetically astounding descriptions of violence and she can list a list right in along with those run ons This is how story telling is Tradition From the article I link below I learn that Raja Rao is among a trio of early writers of Indian fiction in English The adoption of the language of the colonial occupiers cannot be a neutral fact to my lights But what I know about Indian fiction pre Rushdie is nil But we are in an excellent position however here on goodreads being surrounded by so many excellent readers from India Specifically Mala tells me that despite the opinion of the article linked below Kanthapur is not Raja Rao’s best ; to be considered also she recommends The Serpent and the Rope and The Chessmaster and His Moves Sounds reasonable Read it for its prose read it for its politics read it as a history lesson read it as a nice change from yet another boring writer dude from NYC read it as an important canonical work read it for the pleasure of it read it as a lesson in violence read it to see another small corner of the world read it because you will be cooking paneer dal of some kind tonight Read it because it’s an excellent little novel India As Metaphysic? Revisiting Raja Rao’s fictionBy Kanishk Tharoor ;; 1 January 2015Raj Rao was the last of the canonical “founding fathers” of Indian English language fiction to pass away The triumvirate—which included RK Narayan and Mulk Raj Anand—were all born in the first decade of the twentieth century and expired softly about a hundred years later Their lives and careers bridged a century of enormous transformation in India Wrestling the Indian experience into English they set the stage for generations of writers who could inhabit the language without feeling out of placeWith so many South Asians now twinkling in the firmament of English letters it’s easy to forget how new such writing was at the time Anand’s friend George Orwell described English language Indian literature as a “strange phenomenon” and a “cultural curiosity” He doubted that it would manage any lasting significance “It is difficult to believe” Orwell wrote “that it has a literary future”His position looks rather ridiculous given the successes of the last fifty years English language fiction has safely ensconced itself among India’s various literary traditions It offers a deeply rutted path for younger writers to follow bumping along They no longer need to ask for the validation of Western publishers The domestic market for Indian English fiction whether highbrow or “mythological thriller” is incomparably larger and established than it was in Rao’s day English is a natural medium for Indians to express their imaginations to each other and not simply to readers in the Westthanks to the complete review guy


  2. Vaidya Vaidya says:

    I remember driving along the road from KR Pet to Nagamangala and coming across a board that said Kanthapura I knew this was going to be my next book I expected stories from around this place of the Hassan belt but Raja Rao's Kanthapura existed elsewhere on the banks of the fictional Himavathy river nearer Karwar near Puttur and still walkable from the Cauvery Like Malgudi it is fictionalUnlike RK Narayan's tales about a few people living in Malgudi this is the tale of the town itself its uiet ways its characters and then its non violent uprising against British rule the uprising being crushed and the people having to abandon the town There are no happy endings just that life goes on in a different placeThe language is poetic and very literally translated from Kannada There are the rhetorical The police are your uncle's sons? and the recognisable I fall at your feet aD bidde But given that the narrator is an old woman it fits The names are also funny and accessible Nose digging Nanjamma Waterfall Venkatamma etc There's also a fair degree of Magical Realism keeping in nature with being an old woman's recounting of actual happenings with some embellishments The writing is in line with regional writers like Shivaram Karanth SL Bhyrappa and UR Ananathamurthy and I mean that in a good way Even though the language is English the core stays firmly local Also here's a review of Raja Rao's works by Kanishk Tharoor in the Caravan


  3. Belinda Belinda says:

    This is a shining example of the kind of books that professors set for mandatory reading that make you want to scratch your own eyeballs out with a rolling pin I don't even know where to begin to explain exactly why I hate this book so much It may go something like the terrible grammar and the stupid characters and the over describing and the author's pomposity and the and the and the and the AND THE AND THE AND THE AND THEHow many times can one man use the words AND in one paragraph? According to one little random page test I just conducted the number is 34 THIRTY FOUR TIMESThat is all


  4. Himmilicious Himmilicious Himmilicious Himmilicious says:

    Loved reading KanthapuraThis novel is a complete mixture of ReligionMythology and History What I personally liked the most that in this novel the grand harikathas finely blend politics with religious and mythology The fights between mahatma and british draws the picture of the fight between Rama and Ravana between the forces of good and evil like Krishna against the Kalia or Kansa Prahlad against his own father Harishchandra against the Asuras Besides the mahatma is Mohan Krishna slaying the serpent of foreign rule Again Gandhi is compared to Rama as well as Shiva Motherland is compared to Sita and the british Government is compared to RavanaShankara is a veritable dharmraj and swaraj is compared to the three eyed shiva As a gandhian economic programme Moorthy distributes chakras among the village women and inspires them to spin chakras and weave cloth He asks people to boycott foreign goods the money that goes to red man will stay within your country and the mother can feed the foodless and the milkless and the clothlessAdvocates Shankara wears Khadi and appeals to others to do soAn awesome read


  5. Swetha Godavarthi Swetha Godavarthi says:

    This is the first book I have read by Raja Rao and I was hooked after reading the first few lines Not for the plot but for the musical lyrical uality of his prose Words tumble in great succession and bring alive the town and people of Kanthapura As the narrator tells us of the approaching monsoon you can almost hear the rumbling of the clouds and the whoosh of the wind Such is the power of not just Raja Rao's words but the way the words are strung together The book is a fictional account of a uaint little village in the southern part of India Of its simple people and their beliefs and prejudices And how the village rises when the cries of Indian freedom struggle reach its doorstep Having a woman narrate these happenings grounds the novel in the everyday fears and worries of the womenfolk Unlike other accounts of freedom struggle the novel hits you not because you see tremendous sacrifice and acts of bravery but because you see small sacrifices and small acts of kindness mingled with doubt and fear Kanthapura the village of women that is ancient and yet current and its people who continue to inhabit the India of today


  6. Gaurav Garg Gaurav Garg says:

    I have never seen such experimentation with language and grammar as in this novel It truly reflects the state of society in times of British rule over India The author seems to be thinking in Hindi and writing in English To put it in words of his editor Parthasarthy'We might be intellectually English but emotionally we are Indians'A great insight into society and culture and religion and casteism and Gandhi and British That is the way you will find the expression in this book Human emotions have been dealt with uite well Typical Indian thought process shown and one does feel closer to reality of those times even though the work is only inspired by the reality This book can be annoying for few readers but I did not mind the experimentation by Raja Rao One also understands the Gandhi ism better with this book and reasons as to why so many people were supporting him A must read atleast for all Indians


  7. John John says:

    Rao uses English to try to communicate an Indiana vernacular mode of storytelling with very intriguing if long winded results The story itself revolve around the rise of Ghandi and ends on a rather ubiuitous note


  8. Juwi Juwi says:

    contrary to what EMForster thinks this is not the best novel written in English by an Indian


  9. Bhumika Kapoor Bhumika Kapoor says:

    The book is a good one but mind that it is heavy with Gandhian principles The protagonist Moorthy is a adherent follower of the principles of Ahimsa and Satyagraha The village people give him the reverence euivalent to that given to a Mahatma There are many instances when Moorthy's being a brahmin poses a slight hinderance in his venture but he overcomes all of them and continues to fight againt the atrocities of the Government These goals cost Moorthy his lives Many other villagers loose their lives in the processions that they carry outThe ending of the novel is a bit dis satisfying as the title village Kanthapura is left barren all in ruins Only the patel of the village stays back there and other people settle in some other villageRao's use of language is appreciated His language has the capability to retain the essence of the south indian culture


  10. अभिषेक अभिषेक says:

    It is a poem an emotion a movie a chronicle a life It is everything a fine book can have Kanthapura opens with the normal lives of its habitants and ends with their extraordinary journey Journey from Comedy to Tragedy Journey of changing Political Ideologies and the idea of India A fine example of brevity wit and beautiful storytelling


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10 thoughts on “Kanthapura

  1. Nathan "N.R." Gaddis Nathan "N.R." Gaddis says:

    Mahatma Gandhi ki jaiMala warned me that I’d be scratching my head And it was lovely But this ND editions provided sixty pages of helpful notes which reduced somewhat that head scratching But not so much that there was no pleasure leftThe story is the common story of a rural village undergoing political change But I’m not immediately certain that this kind of story is so common; in our current literary climate which so freuently features alienated individuals as protagonists Here the community is the protagonist And there are many individuals within this community They become one in order to fight a violent colonial occupation The novel is violent Alone to experience how violent the practice of non violence becomes the violence which practitioners of non violence must undergo suffer is reason enough to read this oneSince we are in the realm of Gandhi here one is inevitably tempted to respond to the freuent uninformed common wisdom that Pacifism and non violence and non resistance may be good ideas but they don’t work And violence does? And further today when everyone in the know knows that religion is the cause of violence we again have to wonder about the most violent regimes of the twentieth century the fact that they were all secular and that one of them survives into the twenty first century still ruling the world and compare with Gandhi’s own religiously grounded non violent organization It takes an army to resist violence And it takes willful ignorance of the evidence to declare both the non functioning of non violence and religion as the source of violence Just look around folks Prose? Our narrator a village wise woman cultural repository who indeed knows the village of Kanthapura inside and out backwards and forwards is a master of the run on sentence the breathlessness of it and hers should be filed along with that set of aesthetically astounding descriptions of violence and she can list a list right in along with those run ons This is how story telling is Tradition From the article I link below I learn that Raja Rao is among a trio of early writers of Indian fiction in English The adoption of the language of the colonial occupiers cannot be a neutral fact to my lights But what I know about Indian fiction pre Rushdie is nil But we are in an excellent position however here on goodreads being surrounded by so many excellent readers from India Specifically Mala tells me that despite the opinion of the article linked below Kanthapur is not Raja Rao’s best ; to be considered also she recommends The Serpent and the Rope and The Chessmaster and His Moves Sounds reasonable Read it for its prose read it for its politics read it as a history lesson read it as a nice change from yet another boring writer dude from NYC read it as an important canonical work read it for the pleasure of it read it as a lesson in violence read it to see another small corner of the world read it because you will be cooking paneer dal of some kind tonight Read it because it’s an excellent little novel India As Metaphysic? Revisiting Raja Rao’s fictionBy Kanishk Tharoor ;; 1 January 2015Raj Rao was the last of the canonical “founding fathers” of Indian English language fiction to pass away The triumvirate—which included RK Narayan and Mulk Raj Anand—were all born in the first decade of the twentieth century and expired softly about a hundred years later Their lives and careers bridged a century of enormous transformation in India Wrestling the Indian experience into English they set the stage for generations of writers who could inhabit the language without feeling out of placeWith so many South Asians now twinkling in the firmament of English letters it’s easy to forget how new such writing was at the time Anand’s friend George Orwell described English language Indian literature as a “strange phenomenon” and a “cultural curiosity” He doubted that it would manage any lasting significance “It is difficult to believe” Orwell wrote “that it has a literary future”His position looks rather ridiculous given the successes of the last fifty years English language fiction has safely ensconced itself among India’s various literary traditions It offers a deeply rutted path for younger writers to follow bumping along They no longer need to ask for the validation of Western publishers The domestic market for Indian English fiction whether highbrow or “mythological thriller” is incomparably larger and established than it was in Rao’s day English is a natural medium for Indians to express their imaginations to each other and not simply to readers in the Westthanks to the complete review guy

  2. Vaidya Vaidya says:

    I remember driving along the road from KR Pet to Nagamangala and coming across a board that said Kanthapura I knew this was going to be my next book I expected stories from around this place of the Hassan belt but Raja Rao's Kanthapura existed elsewhere on the banks of the fictional Himavathy river nearer Karwar near Puttur and still walkable from the Cauvery Like Malgudi it is fictionalUnlike RK Narayan's tales about a few people living in Malgudi this is the tale of the town itself its uiet ways its characters and then its non violent uprising against British rule the uprising being crushed and the people having to abandon the town There are no happy endings just that life goes on in a different placeThe language is poetic and very literally translated from Kannada There are the rhetorical The police are your uncle's sons? and the recognisable I fall at your feet aD bidde But given that the narrator is an old woman it fits The names are also funny and accessible Nose digging Nanjamma Waterfall Venkatamma etc There's also a fair degree of Magical Realism keeping in nature with being an old woman's recounting of actual happenings with some embellishments The writing is in line with regional writers like Shivaram Karanth SL Bhyrappa and UR Ananathamurthy and I mean that in a good way Even though the language is English the core stays firmly local Also here's a review of Raja Rao's works by Kanishk Tharoor in the Caravan

  3. Belinda Belinda says:

    This is a shining example of the kind of books that professors set for mandatory reading that make you want to scratch your own eyeballs out with a rolling pin I don't even know where to begin to explain exactly why I hate this book so much It may go something like the terrible grammar and the stupid characters and the over describing and the author's pomposity and the and the and the and the AND THE AND THE AND THE AND THEHow many times can one man use the words AND in one paragraph? According to one little random page test I just conducted the number is 34 THIRTY FOUR TIMESThat is all

  4. Himmilicious Himmilicious Himmilicious Himmilicious says:

    Loved reading KanthapuraThis novel is a complete mixture of ReligionMythology and History What I personally liked the most that in this novel the grand harikathas finely blend politics with religious and mythology The fights between mahatma and british draws the picture of the fight between Rama and Ravana between the forces of good and evil like Krishna against the Kalia or Kansa Prahlad against his own father Harishchandra against the Asuras Besides the mahatma is Mohan Krishna slaying the serpent of foreign rule Again Gandhi is compared to Rama as well as Shiva Motherland is compared to Sita and the british Government is compared to RavanaShankara is a veritable dharmraj and swaraj is compared to the three eyed shiva As a gandhian economic programme Moorthy distributes chakras among the village women and inspires them to spin chakras and weave cloth He asks people to boycott foreign goods the money that goes to red man will stay within your country and the mother can feed the foodless and the milkless and the clothlessAdvocates Shankara wears Khadi and appeals to others to do soAn awesome read

  5. Swetha Godavarthi Swetha Godavarthi says:

    This is the first book I have read by Raja Rao and I was hooked after reading the first few lines Not for the plot but for the musical lyrical uality of his prose Words tumble in great succession and bring alive the town and people of Kanthapura As the narrator tells us of the approaching monsoon you can almost hear the rumbling of the clouds and the whoosh of the wind Such is the power of not just Raja Rao's words but the way the words are strung together The book is a fictional account of a uaint little village in the southern part of India Of its simple people and their beliefs and prejudices And how the village rises when the cries of Indian freedom struggle reach its doorstep Having a woman narrate these happenings grounds the novel in the everyday fears and worries of the womenfolk Unlike other accounts of freedom struggle the novel hits you not because you see tremendous sacrifice and acts of bravery but because you see small sacrifices and small acts of kindness mingled with doubt and fear Kanthapura the village of women that is ancient and yet current and its people who continue to inhabit the India of today

  6. Gaurav Garg Gaurav Garg says:

    I have never seen such experimentation with language and grammar as in this novel It truly reflects the state of society in times of British rule over India The author seems to be thinking in Hindi and writing in English To put it in words of his editor Parthasarthy'We might be intellectually English but emotionally we are Indians'A great insight into society and culture and religion and casteism and Gandhi and British That is the way you will find the expression in this book Human emotions have been dealt with uite well Typical Indian thought process shown and one does feel closer to reality of those times even though the work is only inspired by the reality This book can be annoying for few readers but I did not mind the experimentation by Raja Rao One also understands the Gandhi ism better with this book and reasons as to why so many people were supporting him A must read atleast for all Indians

  7. John John says:

    Rao uses English to try to communicate an Indiana vernacular mode of storytelling with very intriguing if long winded results The story itself revolve around the rise of Ghandi and ends on a rather ubiuitous note

  8. Juwi Juwi says:

    contrary to what EMForster thinks this is not the best novel written in English by an Indian

  9. Bhumika Kapoor Bhumika Kapoor says:

    The book is a good one but mind that it is heavy with Gandhian principles The protagonist Moorthy is a adherent follower of the principles of Ahimsa and Satyagraha The village people give him the reverence euivalent to that given to a Mahatma There are many instances when Moorthy's being a brahmin poses a slight hinderance in his venture but he overcomes all of them and continues to fight againt the atrocities of the Government These goals cost Moorthy his lives Many other villagers loose their lives in the processions that they carry outThe ending of the novel is a bit dis satisfying as the title village Kanthapura is left barren all in ruins Only the patel of the village stays back there and other people settle in some other villageRao's use of language is appreciated His language has the capability to retain the essence of the south indian culture

  10. अभिषेक अभिषेक says:

    It is a poem an emotion a movie a chronicle a life It is everything a fine book can have Kanthapura opens with the normal lives of its habitants and ends with their extraordinary journey Journey from Comedy to Tragedy Journey of changing Political Ideologies and the idea of India A fine example of brevity wit and beautiful storytelling

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