Hawkmistress Epub Þ Mass Market Paperback

Hawkmistress Epub Þ Mass Market Paperback


  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 336 pages
  • Hawkmistress
  • Marion Zimmer Bradley
  • English
  • 20 October 2016
  • 9780879977627

10 thoughts on “Hawkmistress

  1. Karen Karen says:

    while I enjoyed the darkover series as a whole this book was probably my favorite I remember signing it out of the local library when I was in sixth or seventh grade and getting so caught up in romilly's familial angst and her desperation to fit in somewhere anywhere that by the time I got the end I was in tears the story stuck with me so when I stumbled across a copy in a second hand bookstore a few years back I immediately snatched it up and brought it home


  2. Valerie Valerie says:

    I've mentioned before that I find the terrestrial animals on Darkover a bizarre aberration Like hawks in this case But there are some Darkovan creatures in this book like the sentry birds This makes it a little less like a terrestrial story just displaced to a different landscapeI think the character of the child Caryl is important than he's often given credit for For a pampered prince sent to Nevarsin to be toughened up in the hope that he'll then survive threshold sickness and dynastic battles I gather he's remarkably adept as a hostage saving the lives of his captors than once And he acts as peacemaker on than one occasion It's always troubled me that Darkovan society never seems to have developed arbitrators Wars and blood feuds rage unchecked but there's no class of negotiators Judges are mentioned in one of the later books or less tangentially but where are the 'reasonable men' and women who try to reconcile uarrels BEFORE they start resulting in mayhem and death? One would like to hope that Caryl would begin developing such a bloc before fraternal strife further decimates a society already weakened by inbreeding and the uniue reproductive problems associated with laranI observe that the nonsense about crying being worthless is compounded in this book by the ridiculous argument that anger is beneficial This double whammy of balderdash has killed people men AND women than many other less pernicious myths There's also a repeated argument it's stated at least three times that nonhuman animals have 'neither memory or imagination' This Cartesian nonsense has been perpetuated too often Is it plausible that creatures who have the EXACT SAME neurons as humans won't have ANY of the same characteristics because they don't cross some arbitrary threshold of 'consciousness'? The idea that nonhumans animals don't learn or retain what they learnis preposterous as is the idea that nonhuman animals have no concerns besides fear or immediated desires It's been repeatedly proven that dogs for example do dream what do these Cartesian dualists think they're dreaming ABOUT? In the final roundtable session of Wim Kayzer's A Glorious Accident Stephen Jay Gould points out that many people have uestioned whether Descartes ever owned a dog If he did they uestion how could he argue that a dog is an unreasoning insensate automaton? This is anthropocentrism at its worst I would recommend Darwin's The Expression of The Emotions in Man And Animals as a corrective except that it's fairly graphic in its description of emotional and physical abuse against zoo and domestic animals and a better study of the issue is overdue2014 I've been rereading the whole series according to internal chronology This is third on the list It's a good book on its own but it doesn't really fit in the series If it had been written as an Earthbound fantasy it would probably be consistent As it is the Darkovan trappings seem a little extraneous As in a different way the terrestrial trappings seem a bit extraneous in a Darkovan setting


  3. Mareli Mareli says:

    I loved this story Romilla is a great woman and her story is wonderful I think this historical period of Darkover is one of the most fascinating oh well all Darkover eras a re fascinatingI'm so glad I decided to read the whole series again


  4. 周婉蓮 차우 크리스티나 Cass 周婉蓮 차우 크리스티나 Cass says:

    Ah Darkover After having read eleven Darkover books reading the next two Stormueen and Hawkmistress in the omnibus The Ages of Chaos feels like returning home albeit to a fantasy home This was surprising since The Ages of Chaos takes place in early Darkovan chronology before Darkovans meet with the Terrans The previous Darkover books I read with the exception of Darkover Landfall have the underlying theme of the clash of Darkover culture with Terran culture In The Ages of Chaos this underlying theme is missing However there are still aspects of Darkover culture that are familiar from previous novels although the setting is an earlier time period What makes the two novels in The Ages of Chaos stand out is the sacrifices that are being made in order to bred and keep laran Darkovan psi powers within the ruling familiesIn the first novel of the omnibus Stormueen the story centers around a young woman a pre teen accurately Dorilys with a special type of laran to call forth lightning and storms Stubborn willful and terribly spoiled as the heir to her father's domain Dorilys has killed twice already before her father decides he needs help training and controlling his daughter and her powers From one of the Towers a trained monitor is sent to help along with another who has his own laran to fear and to conuer as well as his own personal worries worries that affect not just him but the whole of Darkover The story is told primarily through the viewpoints of the two who are sent to help DorilysIn the second novel Hawkmistress the story is told through the main character Romilly who eventually runs away from home after being told she must marry a man she finds absolutely repulsive Fed up with being told what she could and couldn't do as a 'Lady' she disguises herself as a boy as it is safer than to travel as a young woman alone she is 14 in the beginning of the story only to find that she rather enjoys the freedom she has disguised a boy freedom than she ever had as a girl The story is set against the background of a civil war and Romilly finds herself in the company of exiled men and others who are loyal to the exiled King Carolin Romilly's laran is the ability to share minds with hawks and horses and other animals As her father's daughter she learned to train hawks and horses but at the age of 14 was being told it was unseemly to be doing such things things she loved to do Such is the impetus for her leaving her home even her prospective husband would not let her continue training hawks and horses Romilly's only real desire is to be herself and to train hawks and horses Her laran seems harmless enough but there are conseuences and side effects she hadn't thought of As time passes and as she сontinues to use her laran without Tower training she finds her powers aren't really all that simple to deal with and that they could put her own life at riskAlthough I initially thought I wouldn't enjoy these two stories as much as the previous Darkover stories I was surprised to find I enjoyed them just as much Part of this I think is how Bradley writes I find her style engaging As for the stories you are hardly bored as something is always happening and the characters are always doing something unlike other books I could name but won't since they are probably mentioned on this blog somewhere already This makes for good pacing in a story Need I say that there were a few twists here and there? How could there not be these two stories are set in the 'Ages of Chaos' after all ;Overall a good read The omnibus gets 5 out of 5 DOriginally posted on my blog


  5. Jess Candela Jess Candela says:

    I stayed up way too late last night finishing this despite having already read it countless times It doesn't seem to have lost any of its impact since the last time I read it It's not a perfect book but I'm disinclined to pick at its faults And in rereading it now I'm suspecting it to be one of the influential books of my life I have had thoughts like this than once and acted accordinglyShe told herself all the old tales of heroism and uests always begin with the hero having to overcome many trials Now I am the hero why is the hero always a man? of my own uest and I have passed the first trialI also find myself thinking a lot about The Harper Hall of Pern for the first time thinking how similar they are Romilly and Menolly have a lot in common from running away figuring out how to survive stumbling into company with people for whom she can help make a difference in the fate of the world And of course the connection with animals And the under stated background romance that is a future probability than a present reality And the matter of fact reality of homosexuality though that had a bigger personal impact on Romilly than MenollyI noticed that latter bit this time than in previous rereads Because homosexuality has always been a normal part of my daily life it wasn't particularly note worthy to see it in books when I was a kid Especially when you consider how early I read Rubyfruit Jungle I think I was eight or so But now I'm struck by the awareness of the world in which it was published and that makes it impressiveAs always I finished this with a wish for Not that it's incomplete but I'd love to see them all a few years down the line If nothing else I'd love to read Caryl's story But I'll have to wait until I find out if there really is an after life If so I'm sure I will spend many years of it reading the never written seuels to many favorite books


  6. Dlora Dlora says:

    I have read none of the Darkover fantasy series before; this was the first and it was very good Romilly MacAran is the main character of the novel with a gift of laran psychic powers inherited from her father which allows her to train horses and birds In fact it is the threat of losing the hawk she trained that is the last straw that sends her running from home and the arranged marriage to an lecherousold widower Romilly dresses as a boy has adventures gets out of scrapes learns about her laran saves herself and then saves a kingdom The novel was a little too much feminist leaning perhaps and Romilly has a period where she is a bit of a snot that I found unattractive as she deals with the horrors and exigencies of war The story also didn't end satisfyingly for me sort of abrupt and unfinished but then I didn't realize that it is part of a long series I guess what clinches my review is that I liked Hawkmistress enough to want to read the other books in the series


  7. Jason Jason says:

    I do think this one of the weakest novels if not THE weakest that I've read in Bradley's Darkover series Yes it has a very strong female character yes there is the conflict between the sexes But nothing really happens within the conflict between men women father daughter or maintaining tradition vs striving for independence Nothing happens except a very interesting female character huffs puffs broods over life not being fair Instead of lifting the story it drags it down into netherworld of boredomBy no means let this assessment turn you off from this series for I truly enjoy the planet Darkover will return to it again Bradley is a great writer I just think the planet could have done without this addition to the canon I would suggest a reader start somewhere else


  8. Mer Mer says:

    Same story line and people as Zandru's Forge but from one of its non primary characters This book has good pacing although I started to scan the paragraphs in the last several pages to get to the meat of the plot Thankfully I read this in hardback where the vocals and the mental thoughts have different font styles; I suspect I might have been frustrated by the audio and it's inability to distinguish this without an narrater's inflections to distinguish this


  9. Ollivier Ollivier says:

    Clearly my one of my favourites in Darkover along with The Forbidden Tower Very engaging character and storyline all the feministic touch of MZB but not too much gripping story and lot of nature there Loved it


  10. Janet Bristeir Janet Bristeir says:

    Great story as ever


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Hawkmistress[Download] ➵ Hawkmistress Author Marion Zimmer Bradley – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk She had rejected her noble birthright and embraced the freedom only a man could claim She was Romilly who lived among the beasts of hill and forest and communicated with them who tried humanity and tu She had rejected her noble birthright and embraced the freedom only a man could claim She was Romilly who lived among the beasts of hill and forest and communicated with them who tried humanity and turned it down for its evils and jealousies She had the MacAran Gift the rare Laran that conferred mastery over hawk and horse.


About the Author: Marion Zimmer Bradley

Marion Eleanor Zimmer Bradley was an American author of fantasy novels such as The Mists of Avalon and the Darkover series often with a feminist outlookBradley's first published novel length work was Falcons of Narabedla first published in the May issue of Other Worlds When she was a child Bradley stated that she enjoyed reading adventure fantasy authors such as Henry Kuttner Edmond Ham.


10 thoughts on “Hawkmistress

  1. Karen Karen says:

    while I enjoyed the darkover series as a whole this book was probably my favorite I remember signing it out of the local library when I was in sixth or seventh grade and getting so caught up in romilly's familial angst and her desperation to fit in somewhere anywhere that by the time I got the end I was in tears the story stuck with me so when I stumbled across a copy in a second hand bookstore a few years back I immediately snatched it up and brought it home

  2. Valerie Valerie says:

    I've mentioned before that I find the terrestrial animals on Darkover a bizarre aberration Like hawks in this case But there are some Darkovan creatures in this book like the sentry birds This makes it a little less like a terrestrial story just displaced to a different landscapeI think the character of the child Caryl is important than he's often given credit for For a pampered prince sent to Nevarsin to be toughened up in the hope that he'll then survive threshold sickness and dynastic battles I gather he's remarkably adept as a hostage saving the lives of his captors than once And he acts as peacemaker on than one occasion It's always troubled me that Darkovan society never seems to have developed arbitrators Wars and blood feuds rage unchecked but there's no class of negotiators Judges are mentioned in one of the later books or less tangentially but where are the 'reasonable men' and women who try to reconcile uarrels BEFORE they start resulting in mayhem and death? One would like to hope that Caryl would begin developing such a bloc before fraternal strife further decimates a society already weakened by inbreeding and the uniue reproductive problems associated with laranI observe that the nonsense about crying being worthless is compounded in this book by the ridiculous argument that anger is beneficial This double whammy of balderdash has killed people men AND women than many other less pernicious myths There's also a repeated argument it's stated at least three times that nonhuman animals have 'neither memory or imagination' This Cartesian nonsense has been perpetuated too often Is it plausible that creatures who have the EXACT SAME neurons as humans won't have ANY of the same characteristics because they don't cross some arbitrary threshold of 'consciousness'? The idea that nonhumans animals don't learn or retain what they learnis preposterous as is the idea that nonhuman animals have no concerns besides fear or immediated desires It's been repeatedly proven that dogs for example do dream what do these Cartesian dualists think they're dreaming ABOUT? In the final roundtable session of Wim Kayzer's A Glorious Accident Stephen Jay Gould points out that many people have uestioned whether Descartes ever owned a dog If he did they uestion how could he argue that a dog is an unreasoning insensate automaton? This is anthropocentrism at its worst I would recommend Darwin's The Expression of The Emotions in Man And Animals as a corrective except that it's fairly graphic in its description of emotional and physical abuse against zoo and domestic animals and a better study of the issue is overdue2014 I've been rereading the whole series according to internal chronology This is third on the list It's a good book on its own but it doesn't really fit in the series If it had been written as an Earthbound fantasy it would probably be consistent As it is the Darkovan trappings seem a little extraneous As in a different way the terrestrial trappings seem a bit extraneous in a Darkovan setting

  3. Mareli Mareli says:

    I loved this story Romilla is a great woman and her story is wonderful I think this historical period of Darkover is one of the most fascinating oh well all Darkover eras a re fascinatingI'm so glad I decided to read the whole series again

  4. 周婉蓮 차우 크리스티나 Cass 周婉蓮 차우 크리스티나 Cass says:

    Ah Darkover After having read eleven Darkover books reading the next two Stormueen and Hawkmistress in the omnibus The Ages of Chaos feels like returning home albeit to a fantasy home This was surprising since The Ages of Chaos takes place in early Darkovan chronology before Darkovans meet with the Terrans The previous Darkover books I read with the exception of Darkover Landfall have the underlying theme of the clash of Darkover culture with Terran culture In The Ages of Chaos this underlying theme is missing However there are still aspects of Darkover culture that are familiar from previous novels although the setting is an earlier time period What makes the two novels in The Ages of Chaos stand out is the sacrifices that are being made in order to bred and keep laran Darkovan psi powers within the ruling familiesIn the first novel of the omnibus Stormueen the story centers around a young woman a pre teen accurately Dorilys with a special type of laran to call forth lightning and storms Stubborn willful and terribly spoiled as the heir to her father's domain Dorilys has killed twice already before her father decides he needs help training and controlling his daughter and her powers From one of the Towers a trained monitor is sent to help along with another who has his own laran to fear and to conuer as well as his own personal worries worries that affect not just him but the whole of Darkover The story is told primarily through the viewpoints of the two who are sent to help DorilysIn the second novel Hawkmistress the story is told through the main character Romilly who eventually runs away from home after being told she must marry a man she finds absolutely repulsive Fed up with being told what she could and couldn't do as a 'Lady' she disguises herself as a boy as it is safer than to travel as a young woman alone she is 14 in the beginning of the story only to find that she rather enjoys the freedom she has disguised a boy freedom than she ever had as a girl The story is set against the background of a civil war and Romilly finds herself in the company of exiled men and others who are loyal to the exiled King Carolin Romilly's laran is the ability to share minds with hawks and horses and other animals As her father's daughter she learned to train hawks and horses but at the age of 14 was being told it was unseemly to be doing such things things she loved to do Such is the impetus for her leaving her home even her prospective husband would not let her continue training hawks and horses Romilly's only real desire is to be herself and to train hawks and horses Her laran seems harmless enough but there are conseuences and side effects she hadn't thought of As time passes and as she сontinues to use her laran without Tower training she finds her powers aren't really all that simple to deal with and that they could put her own life at riskAlthough I initially thought I wouldn't enjoy these two stories as much as the previous Darkover stories I was surprised to find I enjoyed them just as much Part of this I think is how Bradley writes I find her style engaging As for the stories you are hardly bored as something is always happening and the characters are always doing something unlike other books I could name but won't since they are probably mentioned on this blog somewhere already This makes for good pacing in a story Need I say that there were a few twists here and there? How could there not be these two stories are set in the 'Ages of Chaos' after all ;Overall a good read The omnibus gets 5 out of 5 DOriginally posted on my blog

  5. Jess Candela Jess Candela says:

    I stayed up way too late last night finishing this despite having already read it countless times It doesn't seem to have lost any of its impact since the last time I read it It's not a perfect book but I'm disinclined to pick at its faults And in rereading it now I'm suspecting it to be one of the influential books of my life I have had thoughts like this than once and acted accordinglyShe told herself all the old tales of heroism and uests always begin with the hero having to overcome many trials Now I am the hero why is the hero always a man? of my own uest and I have passed the first trialI also find myself thinking a lot about The Harper Hall of Pern for the first time thinking how similar they are Romilly and Menolly have a lot in common from running away figuring out how to survive stumbling into company with people for whom she can help make a difference in the fate of the world And of course the connection with animals And the under stated background romance that is a future probability than a present reality And the matter of fact reality of homosexuality though that had a bigger personal impact on Romilly than MenollyI noticed that latter bit this time than in previous rereads Because homosexuality has always been a normal part of my daily life it wasn't particularly note worthy to see it in books when I was a kid Especially when you consider how early I read Rubyfruit Jungle I think I was eight or so But now I'm struck by the awareness of the world in which it was published and that makes it impressiveAs always I finished this with a wish for Not that it's incomplete but I'd love to see them all a few years down the line If nothing else I'd love to read Caryl's story But I'll have to wait until I find out if there really is an after life If so I'm sure I will spend many years of it reading the never written seuels to many favorite books

  6. Dlora Dlora says:

    I have read none of the Darkover fantasy series before; this was the first and it was very good Romilly MacAran is the main character of the novel with a gift of laran psychic powers inherited from her father which allows her to train horses and birds In fact it is the threat of losing the hawk she trained that is the last straw that sends her running from home and the arranged marriage to an lecherousold widower Romilly dresses as a boy has adventures gets out of scrapes learns about her laran saves herself and then saves a kingdom The novel was a little too much feminist leaning perhaps and Romilly has a period where she is a bit of a snot that I found unattractive as she deals with the horrors and exigencies of war The story also didn't end satisfyingly for me sort of abrupt and unfinished but then I didn't realize that it is part of a long series I guess what clinches my review is that I liked Hawkmistress enough to want to read the other books in the series

  7. Jason Jason says:

    I do think this one of the weakest novels if not THE weakest that I've read in Bradley's Darkover series Yes it has a very strong female character yes there is the conflict between the sexes But nothing really happens within the conflict between men women father daughter or maintaining tradition vs striving for independence Nothing happens except a very interesting female character huffs puffs broods over life not being fair Instead of lifting the story it drags it down into netherworld of boredomBy no means let this assessment turn you off from this series for I truly enjoy the planet Darkover will return to it again Bradley is a great writer I just think the planet could have done without this addition to the canon I would suggest a reader start somewhere else

  8. Mer Mer says:

    Same story line and people as Zandru's Forge but from one of its non primary characters This book has good pacing although I started to scan the paragraphs in the last several pages to get to the meat of the plot Thankfully I read this in hardback where the vocals and the mental thoughts have different font styles; I suspect I might have been frustrated by the audio and it's inability to distinguish this without an narrater's inflections to distinguish this

  9. Ollivier Ollivier says:

    Clearly my one of my favourites in Darkover along with The Forbidden Tower Very engaging character and storyline all the feministic touch of MZB but not too much gripping story and lot of nature there Loved it

  10. Janet Bristeir Janet Bristeir says:

    Great story as ever

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *